Volume 19, Number 1: 

After the Fires: School Counselors Respond

Maureen Buckley, Sonoma State University, and Alina Robello, University of California Riverside

Abstract

This article explores school counselors’ experiences of the 2017 Sonoma Complex wildfires. Thirty-eight school counselors completed a 20-item survey exploring impact and responses to the devastating wildfires. Results detail school counselors’ insights regarding post-fire responses and the impact of the fires on students, families, and school staff. Findings include the importance of open and collaborative communication, counseling support, and contextual interventions that address both instrumental and psychological needs. Implications for practice and future research are presented. 

Citation

Buckley, M. & Robello, A. (2021). After the fires: School counselors respond. Journal of School Counseling, 19(1). http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v19n1.pdf 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

Volume 19, Number 2: 

School Refusal in a Multi-Tiered System of Supports Model: Cognitive-Behavioral and Mindfulness Interventions

Lindsey M. Nichols, University of Wyoming, Sally Mueller, Missoula, Montana, and Kelley Donisthorpe, University of Montana

Abstract

School attendance is a complex topic for all school stakeholders preparing students for college and career success. Students who refuse to attend or avoid school are affected or influenced by a myriad of reasons such as their own physical or mental health issues. This article explores the various factors at the root of school refusal, particularly anxiety. Considering students’ possible sources of distress, cognitive-behavioral and mindfulness interventions are discussed as well as other strategies across a multi-tiered system of supports model. Three case studies provide insight into various interventions that school counselors and other school personnel may use in school refusal situations. 

Citation

Nichols, L. M., Mueller, S., & Donisthorpe, K. (2021). School refusal in a multi-tiered system of supports model: Cognitive-behavioral and mindfulness interventionsJournal of School Counseling, 19(2). http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v19n2.pdf 

Type of Article

Current Issues

Volume 19, Number 3: 

Resilience Factors in College Students at Risk of Depression

Diane Marcotte, Université du Québec à Montréal, and Aude Villatte, Université du Québec en Outaouais

Abstract

The college transition constitutes a vulnerability period for at-risk students. Although several risk factors associated with depression have been identified in the young adult population, very few studies to date have focused on the aspect of resilience during this academic transition. In the present study, a subgroup of resilient students, who did not report depressive symptoms despite experiencing some family risk factors, was compared to a subgroup of depressive students. The results revealed that, among these variables, a low level of dysfunctional attitudes related to dependency and well-defined personal goals can be considered as being higher resiliency variables. 

Citation

Marcotte, D., & Villatte, A. (2021). Resilience factors in college students at risk of depression. Journal of School Counseling, 19(3). http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v19n3.pdf 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

Volume 19, Number 4: 

School Counselors’ Role in Child Rights and Human Rights Education: Moving Beyond One’s Professional Comfort Zone

Juneau Mahan Gary, Kean University

Abstract

Average American students are seldom aware of child and human rights principles and their impact globally and locally. School counselors are one logical group of school specialists skilled to facilitate school-based, rights-based (i.e., child and human rights) initiatives to promote students’ awareness. Moving beyond their professional comfort zones, school counselors have (a) training in leadership, systemic change, advocacy, and collaboration and (b) requisite skills to facilitate students’ development of a rights-based foundation to become engaged and responsible global citizens with a mature rights-based lens. Rights-based resources are offered for guidance lessons, academic lessons, and extra-curricular programs. 

Citation

Gary, J. M. (2021). School counselors’ role in child rights and human rights education: Moving beyond one’s professional comfort zone. Journal of School Counseling, 19(4). http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v19n4.pdf 

Type of Article

Current Issues

Volume 19, Number 5: 

School Counselors and School-Community Partnerships: Perceptions From School Counselors

Sabri Dogan, Siirt University, and Colette T. Dollarhide and David Julian, The Ohio State University

Abstract

Numerous authors have called for school counselors to be leaders in school-community collaborative partnerships, yet current research pertaining to school counselors’ involvement with such efforts is lacking. This survey was conducted to ascertain school counselors’ perceptions of their role and training relative to school-community partnerships in a Midwestern state. 

Citation

Dogan, S., Dollarhide, C. T., & Julian, D. (2021). School counselors and school-community partnerships: Perceptions from school counselors. Journal of School Counseling, 19(5). http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v19n5.pdf 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

Volume 19, Number 6: 

Supporting the Success of Student Refugees Using a Multi-Tiered Systemic Approach

Dana T. Isawi, Northern Illinois University, Olamojiba Bamgbose, University of Wisconsin Whitewater, and Teresa. A. Fisher, Northern Illinois University

Abstract

School counselors are in a unique position to support the development and success of student refugees. This article presents a multi-tiered systemic approach for school counselors to enhance the social/emotional, academic, and career development of student refugees in K-12 schools. The article elaborates on culturally sensitive practical interventions for working with this population of students. 

Citation

Isawi, D. T., Bamgbose, O., & Fisher, T. A. (2021). Supporting the success of student refugees using a multi-tiered systemic approach. Journal of School Counseling, 19(6). http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v19n6.pdf 

Type of Article

Resource Brief

Volume 19, Number 7: 

Forward March: Implementing the ASCA National Model to Support Military-Connected Students

Taqueena S. Quintana, Arkansas State University, and Rebekah F. Cole, Arkansas State University

Abstract

This article outlines the challenges that military-connected students face and discusses ways in which school counselors may utilize each of the four components of the ASCA National Model to help this population. Finally, a case study is presented to demonstrate how school counselors may support military-connected students. Utilizing the ASCA model is especially important when working with military-connected students, who may have needs that are unfamiliar to many school counselors. 

Citation

Quintana, T. S., & Cole, R. F. (2021). Forward march: Implementing the ASCA National Model to support military-connected students. Journal of School Counseling, 19(7). http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v19n7.pdf 

Type of Article

Current Issues

Volume 19, Number 8: 

Experiences of Successful First-Generation College Students With College Access

Jonathan R. Ricks, The University of North Carolina at Pembroke, and Jeffrey M. Warren, North Carolina Central University

Abstract

A plethora of educational research suggests that first-generation college students (FGCS) are at a distinct disadvantage when attempting to access college. Much of the research on this population examines the struggles these students face. Using a phenomenological approach, this qualitative study investigated lived experiences of ten successful FGCS enrolled at an historically Black university in southeastern United States. Themes emerged related to the participants’ pre-college circumstances, decision to attend college, and experiences accessing college. The results of the study serve as a guide for professional school counselors who aim to develop preventative measures and promote social and cultural capital for prospective FGCS. 

Citation

Ricks, J. R., & Warren, J. M. (2021). Experiences of successful first-generation college students with college access. Journal of School Counseling, 19(8). http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v19n8.pdf 

Type of Article

Theory and Research


Volume 19, Number 9: 

Utilizing Play Therapy Within the ASCA National Model

Heather J. Fye, University of Alabama, and J. Steve Rainey, Kent State University

Abstract

School counselors are uniquely qualified to meet the increasing mental health needs of students within the school setting. Play therapy is an evidence-based intervention used by school counselors to address the mental health needs of youth. Job demands require school counselors to provide goal-focused and time-sensitive interventions. Accordingly, this article describes how to utilize play therapy within the ASCA National Model and provides examples for elementary school counselors implementing play therapy interventions with students. A case example illustrates individual play therapy goal setting. 

Citation

Fye, H. J., & Rainey, J. S. (2021). Utilizing play therapy within the ASCA National Model. Journal of School Counseling, 19(9). http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v19n9.pdf 

Type of Article

Resource Brief


Volume 19, Number 10:
 

Experiences of School Counselors-in-Training in a School-based Clinical Practicum

J. Richelle Joe, University of Central Florida, Jessica Martin, Lamar University, and Viki Kelchner and Jon R. Borland, University of Central Florida

Abstract

In this phenomenological study, ten school counselors-in-training were interviewed to explore their experiences at a school-based clinical practicum. Emergent themes included professional growth and development, collaboration and teamwork, knowledge gains, and preparation. Results of the study indicate that a school-based clinical practicum facilitates self-efficacy, provides unique collaborative experiences, and allows for an understanding of family and school systems mediated by on-site faculty supervision. Implications include curricular considerations for school counselor preparation and the value of school-based clinical practicum experiences for school counselors-in-training. 

Citation

Joe, J. R., Martin, J., Kelchner, V., & Borland, J. R. (2021). Experiences of school counselors-in-training in a school-based clinical practicum. Journal of School Counseling, 19(10). http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v19n10.pdf 

Type of Article

Theory and Research


Volume 19, Number 11: 

Big Five Factor Personality Differences by Academic Major and Gender in a Faith-Based University Sample

David E. Jones, Liberty University, Anna Ord, Regent University, Kate Duskey, Cincinnati Christian University, Kate Jones, Batavia, OH, Neil Duchac, Kennesay State University, Mariah Dern, University of Cincinnati, and Lydia Montiel, Regent University

Abstract

Big Five personality research has been criticized for lack of generalizability due to the overuse of undergraduate psychology student samples. We address this criticism by including undergraduate religion students. This study explores student personality traits and gender differences in an underrepresented sample. Results indicated that religion students scored significantly higher in agreeableness than business students, and lower in neuroticism compared to education students. Gender comparisons revealed significant differences in terms of agreeableness, conscientiousness, neuroticism, and openness. Findings underscore the importance of tailored school counseling interventions based on the personality traits and gender to achieve an optimal fit between personality, gender, and career choice. 

Citation

Jones, D. E., Ord, A., Duskey, K., Jones, K., Duchac, N., Dern, M., & Montiel, L. (2021). Big Five factor personality differences by academic major and gender in a faith-based university sample. Journal of School Counseling, 19(11). http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v19n11.pdf 

Type of Article

Theory and Research


Volume 19, Number 12: 

Essential Addictions Terminology for School Counselors

Edward T. Dunbar, Jr., Mark D. Nelson, and Dawn S. Tarabochia, Montana State University

Abstract

Substance use and other addictive behaviors can last throughout the lifespan and lead to other health issues. Adolescents are not immune to addiction or addictive behaviors and are more likely to experience curiosity and to engage in experimentation. Historically, addiction has been a topic that has been avoided or stigmatized. Further, the use of stigmatizing language can be detrimental to those seeking help for addiction or addictive behaviors. Thus, discussing addiction or addictive behaviors may be difficult even for those in the helping professions due to worry about stigmatizing language. The purpose of this brief report is to provide school counselors with resources associated with current addiction terminology and definitions. Specifically, this report will address a list of essential terminology associated with addictions and a list of destigmatizing terminology and replacement language for outdated stigmatizing addictions terminology. 

Citation

Dunbar, E. T., Jr., Nelson, M. D., & Tarabochia, D. S. (2021). Essential addictions terminology for school counselors. Journal of School Counseling, 19(12). http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v19n12.pdf 

Type of Article

Resource Brief


Volume 19, Number 13: 

Professional School Counselor and Principal Recognition of Appropriate and Inappropriate Activities

Dana L. Unger, University of North Carolina at Pembroke, Steve Rainey, Kent State University, and Hannah R. Anderson, Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy

Abstract

This study examined professional school counselor and principal recognition of appropriate and inappropriate activities of professional school counselors. Researchers investigated the differences in recognition between professional school counselors and principals serving at various educational levels. Results showed differences in what professional school counselors see as appropriate and inappropriate as compared to and contrasted with what principals deemed appropriate. There were six items in which principals and school counselors at every level were in clear agreement. 

Citation

Unger, D. L., Rainey, S., & Anderson, H. R. (2021). Professional school counselor and principal recognition of appropriate and inappropriate activities. Journal of School Counseling, 19(13). http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v19n13.pdf 

Type of Article

Theory and Research


Volume 19, Number 14:
 

Pathways for Implementing a School Therapy Dog Program: Steps for Success and Best Practice Considerations

Jennifer VonLintel, B.F. Kitchen Elementary School, and Laura Bruneau, Adams State University

Abstract

Animal-assisted interventions intentionally incorporate the power of the human-animal bond into the therapeutic process. Research findings indicate that therapy dog programs can reduce student stress and build connections within the school, strengthening student response to school-based interventions and providing a foundation to achieve a diverse range of goals. Two main pathways for school counselors in implementing therapy dog programs are described, including (a) utilizing community-based volunteer teams and (b) creating a comprehensive therapy dog program. Strategies for incorporating best practices in animal-assisted interventions, including counselor competence and animal welfare, are offered. 

Citation

VonLintel, J., & Bruneau, L. (2021). Pathways for implementing a school therapy dog program: Steps for success and best practice considerations. Journal of School Counseling, 19(14). http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v19n14.pdf 

Type of Article

Innovative Methods


Volume 19, Number 15:
 

A Validation Study of the Multicultural Counseling Inventory for School Counselors

Daniel A. DeCino, University of South Dakota, Molly M. Strear and Julie Chronister, San Francisco State University, Hsin-Ya Liao, Washington State University, Chih-Chin Chou, University of South Florida, and Steven Chesnut, University of South Dakota

Abstract

This article summarizes the exploratory factor analysis and confirmatory factor analysis results from a sample of (N = 322) school counselors’ multicultural competence in three Midwestern states. Findings indicate the factor analytic structure of the original Multicultural Counseling Inventory (MCI) can be revised to a parsimonious 15-item, three-factor model for school counselors. Implications suggest that research with the refined 15-item MCI in other areas and more diverse populations is warranted. 

Citation

DeCino, D. A., Strear, M. M., Chronister, J., Liao, H.-Y., Chou, C.-C., & Chesnut, S. (2021). A validation study of the Multicultural Counseling Inventory for school counselors. Journal of School Counseling, 19(15). http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v19n15.pdf 

Type of Article

Theory and Research


Volume 19, Number 16:
 

Perceptions of Sexual and Gender Minorities and Allied Youth Regarding Bullying

Laura M. Crothers and Jered B. Kolbert, Duquesne University, Daniel S. Wells, School District in Charlotte-Mecklenburg, North Carolina, Casandra Berbary, Rochester Institute of Technology, Suzanne Chatlos, State University of New York at Plattsburgh, Julie Buzgon, School District in Broward County, Florida, Matthew Joseph and Ara J. Schmitt, Duquesne University, Latitia Lattanzio and John Lipinski, Indiana University of Pennsylvania, and Jacob Wadsworth, Duquesne University

Abstract

A sample of sexual- and gender-minority students (n = 65; 51.6% female; 55.8% White; M age = 16.94 years) reported more peer victimization, lower academic achievement, and poorer perceptions of school safety as compared to their heterosexual allied peers. Sexual- and gender-minority students demonstrating higher levels of sexual activity and having trouble developing friendships reported increased victimization. Staff and peer supportiveness and anti-bullying enforcement significantly predicted less bullying. Anti-bullying programs containing sexual- and gender-minority-specific language were associated with less bullying of sexual- and gender-minority youth. Positive relationships existed between anti-bullying enforcement and support by school personnel and peers. 

Citation

Crothers, L. M., Kolbert, J. B., Wells, D. S., Berbary, C., Chatlos, S., Buzgon, J., Joseph, M., Schmitt, A. J., Lattanzio, L., Lipinski, J., & Wadsworth, J. (2021). Perceptions of sexual and gender minorities and allied youth regarding bullying. Journal of School Counseling, 19(16). http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v19n16.pdf 

Type of Article

Theory and Research


Volume 19, Number 17:
 

Effects of a Comprehensive School Counseling Training on Pre-ASCA-Trained School Counselors: A Single-Case Research Design

Diane Zimmer, Firelands Local School District, John Laux, University of Toledo, Yanhong Liu, Syracuse University, and Madeline Clark and Jennifer L. Reynolds, University of Toledo

Abstract

This study investigated the impact of a multicomponent training program on the American School Counselor Association’s National Model of school counseling. The model was designed to enhance school counselors’ competence in implementing a comprehensive school counseling program. An ABA single case design was used to collect baseline, training, and post-training data. The participants (n = 3) were pre-ASCA-trained school counselors with 15 years or more of school counseling experience. All exhibited growth during the training phase, which was sustained through the post-training phase. 

Citation

Zimmer D., Laux, J., Liu, Y., Clark, M., & Reynolds, J. L. (2021). Effects of a comprehensive school counseling training on pre-ASCA-trained school counselors: A single-case research design. Journal of School Counseling, 19(17). http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v19n17.pdf 

Type of Article

Theory and Research


Volume 19, Number 18:
 

Examining Self-Efficacy and Preparedness to Succeed in Post-Secondary Education: A Survey of Recent High School Graduates

Rachel Saunders, University of Cincinnati, Sejal Parikh Foxx, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, S. Todd Bolin and Brittany Prioleau, Charlotte, North Carolina, Merry Leigh Dameron, Western Carolina University, Maylee Vazquez, North Carolina A&T State University, and Jennifer Perry, Georgia Southern University

Abstract

Professional school counselors are charged with preparing students to be college and career ready and students may depend on their school counselor to provide them with a comprehensive plan for post-secondary options. Unfortunately, even with adequate access to academic knowledge and skills, not all students may be career and college ready due to the lack of confidence in their ability to succeed. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to explore the self-efficacy of high school graduates regarding their preparedness to succeed in a post-secondary education. Using a univariate of analysis of variance, the data collected from a sample of 154 college students were analyzed. Results indicated that when it comes to positive personal characteristics, Asian American students had statistically lower scores. Additional analysis also revealed that students from rural schools had lower academic competence regarding their self-efficacy. The article presents implications for school counselors, school counselors in-training, and counseling programs. 

Citation

Saunders, R., Foxx, S. P., Bolin, S. T., Prioleau, B., Dameron, M. L., Vazquez, M., & Perry, J. (2021). Examining self-efficacy and preparedness to succeed in post-secondary education: A survey of recent high school graduates. Journal of School Counseling, 19(18). http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v19n18.pdf 

Type of Article

Theory and Research


Volume 19, Number 19:
 

School Counseling and Social Emotional Learning Programs

Helena Stevens, Minnesota State University Mankato

Abstract

School counselors implement social emotional learning (SEL) programs to support students’ holistic development and to prepare them for both academic and personal success. It is imperative that school counselors use evaluation research as they continue to refine their implementation and program selection efforts. This phenomenological qualitative case study investigated the experiences that two groups of students had with an SEL program. Three themes emerged including inconsistent experiences, disconnected perceptions about social-emotional needs, and the importance of using students as stakeholders. Implications for school counselors and counselor educators are provided. 

Citation

Stevens, H. (2021). School counseling and social emotional learning programs. Journal of School Counseling, 19(19). http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v19n19.pdf 

Type of Article

Theory and Research


Volume 19, Number 20:

Individual Counseling in Schools: A Process Model for School Counselors

Mark D. Nelson, Edward T. Dunbar, Jr., and Dawn S. Tarabochia, Montana State University

Abstract

According to the American School Counselor Association, the role of a school counselor includes improving success for all students. Thus, the profession of school counseling encompasses a variety of tasks, duties, and responsibilities. One of the most fundamental responsibilities of a school counselor is to provide individual counseling to students. While individual counseling is undoubtedly essential to the role of a school counselors, information and resources regarding the process of providing individual counseling to students remain somewhat obscure given that school counselors do not diagnose or treat students and generally provide short-term counseling. The purpose of this resource brief is to provide school counselors with an outline of an individual counseling process, as well as specific resources to guide school counselors as they engage in individual counseling with students.

Citation

Nelson, M. D., Dunbar, E. T., Jr., & Tarabochia, D. S. (2021). Individual counseling in schools: A process model for school counselors. Journal of School Counseling, 19(20). http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v19n20.pdf 

Type of Article

Resource Brief

 

Volume 19, Number 21:

School Counselors’ Use of Marcia’s Identity Status Theory for Career Advisement and Consultation and Collaboration

Jered B. Kolbert, Duquesne University, Derron Hilts, Syracuse University, Laura M. Crothers, Duquesne University, and Matthew L. Nice, Indiana University of Pennsylvania

Abstract

In this paper, we describe how school counselors can use Marcia’s theory of psychosocial identity development to provide differentiated career advisement for adolescent students. Furthermore, we identify how school counselors can use Marcia's theory of psychosocial identity development when collaborating and consulting with teachers and parents to assist them in supporting the career development of students. We explain how school counselors can determine a student's identity status, and we provide highly specific strategies for career advisement for adolescent students in accordance with each of Marcia's identity statuses.

Citation

Kolbert, J. B., Hilts, D., Crothers, L. M., & Nice, M. L. (2021). School counselors’ use of Marcia’s identity status theory for career advisement and consultation and collaboration. Journal of School Counseling, 19(21). http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v19n21.pdf

 

Volume 19, Number 22:

What’s in a Word?: School Counselor and ESOL Teacher Perceptions and Attitudes about Collaboration 

Malti Tuttle and Jamie Harrison, Auburn University, Leonissa V. Johnson, Clark Atlanta University, and Melissa Mecadon-Mann, Auburn University

Abstract

Collaboration in the school setting is a vital component to student success. Two key stakeholders who support and advocate for English Learners (ELs) are school counselors and English to Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) teachers. The authors of this manuscript conducted a research study to measure school counselor and ESOL teacher perceptions and attitudes about collaboration by using a semantic differential scale developed by Gibbons et al. (2010) to measure school counselor perceptions and attitudes of collaboration. The sample included 105 original responses which were collected prior to removing incomplete responses. A total of 82 responses were retained for the data analysis which included school counselors (n=54) and ESOL Teachers (n=28). The findings from this research study suggest varying attitudes about collaboration among these two stakeholders and yield factors that can influence educator training, practice and research. Factors examined include geographical location, district type, and years of experience.

Citation

Tuttle, M., Harrison, J., Johnson, L., & Mecadon-Mann, M. (2021). What’s in a word?: School counselor and ESOL teacher perceptions and attitudes about collaboration. Journal of School Counseling, 19(22). http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v19n22.pdf

 

Volume 19, Number 23:

Anxiety: 6-Week Social Emotional Learning Intervention for Elementary School Counselors

Allison C. Paolini, Arkansas State University

Abstract

This Brief Resource addresses anxiety and the dire impact anxiety has on student well-being and performance. Anxiety prevents students from focusing, concentrating, feeling safe, grounded, and at ease. There are immeasurable numbers of students who are experiencing anxiety during this pandemic. Social Emotional Learning works to enhance students’ innate abilities to improve coping, regulate emotions, problem solve, take on leadership roles, focus on control, mindfulness, optimism, gratitude, communication, and empowerment. These are vital skills to possess in order to survive times when people face adversity. This manuscript will provide a definition of anxiety, symptoms of anxiety, consequences of anxiety, a definition of social emotional learning (SEL), and how augmenting social emotional learning skills can help to mitigate anxiety. Additionally, a 6-Week social emotional learning intervention addressing anxiety is included.

Citation

Paolini, A. C. (2021). Anxiety: 6-week social emotional learning intervention for elementary school counselors. Journal of School Counseling, 19(23). http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v19n23.pdf

 

Volume 19, Number 24:

Examining School Counselors’ Wellness and its Contribution to their Levels of Altruism and Burnout

Dodie Limberg, University of South Carolina, Christopher A. Cook, Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary, Shelby Gonzales & Esther McCartnery, University of South Carolina, and Shannon Romagnolo, University of North Florida

Abstract

We examined 437 school counselors’ levels of wellness and its relationship with altruism and burnout. Our results support the inverse relationship of wellness and burnout, but school counselors experiencing higher levels of wellness had higher levels of altruism. Our implications highlight the importance of school counselors advocating for their role as it relates to wellness, burnout and altruism.

Citation

Limberg D., Cook, C. A., Gonzales, S., McCartnery, E., & Romagnolo, S. (2021). Examining school counselors’ wellness and its contribution to their levels of altruism and burnout. Journal of School Counseling, 19(24). http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v19n24.pdf

 

Volume 19, Number 25:

Moving from School Counseling Compliance to Cohesion: Making Mandates Meaningful

Robert Feirsen, Carol Dahir, and Daniel Cinotti, New York Institute of Technology

Abstract

The New York State Education Department (2016, 2018) recently passed sweeping reforms impacting school counseling practice, preparation, and credentialing. School districts are now required to have a comprehensive school counseling program (CSCP) for all students in grades K-12. A statewide survey collected perception data from school counselors, building leaders, and school counseling supervisors regarding the implementation of important aspects of these new regulations. The authors conclude that the core of success lies in the collaboration of building leaders and school counselors to sustain meaningful implementation of comprehensive school counseling programs.

Citation

Feirsen, R., Dahir, C., & Cinotti, D. (2021). Moving from school counseling compliance to cohesion: Making mandates meaningful. Journal of School Counseling, 19(25). http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v19n25.pdf

 

Volume 19, Number 26:

Using Adventure Therapy to Improve Self-Efficacy of Middle School Students

David D. Christian, University of Arkansas, Patrick McMillion, Northern Illinois University, Cian L. Brown, University of Oklahoma, Timothy J. Schoonover, University of Arkansas, and Brian A. Miller, Bedford School District

Abstract

School counselors are encouraged to employ evidence-based practices to meet students’ mental health needs, yet a scarcity of outcome research limits their access to adequately supported prevention and intervention resources (Griffith et al., 2019). To maximize their impact and time, school counselors should consider conducting group counseling with students. Specifically, school counselors should consider implementing Adventure Therapy (AT), a kinesthetically engaging form of group counseling that uses adventure activities to promote participation through collaborative problem solving, encourage responsible decision-making, and foster accountability among students (Christian et al., 2019). While literature supports the use of AT in schools, there is a dearth of outcome studies examining its efficacy with students. This study explored the impact of AT on 7th graders’ self-efficacy (n = 19). The researchers measured Total, Academic, Social, and Emotional self-efficacy using the Self-Efficacy Questionnaire for Children at pre, mid, post, and follow-up. Results suggested AT groups were effective for increasing all types of self-efficacy for participants with males showing a greater increase. Implications for school counselors and future research are described.

Citation

Christian D. D., McMillion, P., Brown, C. L., Schoonover, T. J., Miller, B. A. (2021). Using adventure therapy to improve self-efficacy of middle school students. Journal of School Counseling, 19(26). http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v19n26.pdf

 

Volume 19, Number 27:

A Narrative Inquiry Study: The Experiences of a School Counselor at a Continuation High School

Edwin Hernandez, California State University, San Bernardino 

Abstract

Alternative education is one of the contexts that receives little attention in research and practice. This narrative inquiry study explores the narrative of a school counselor at a continuation high school to better understand his experiences, challenges, contradictions, and opportunities of serving in an unfamiliar educational sector. This paper provides recommendations for policy and practice, specifically for professional school counselors, school district counseling personnel, and counselor educators to consider in their efforts to support counselors and students in continuation high schools/alternative education.

Citation

Hernandez, E. (2021). A narrative inquiry study: The experiences of a school counselor at a continuation high school. Journal of School Counseling, 19(27). http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v19n27.pdf

 

Volume 19, Number 28:

School Counselors’ Conceptualizations of Their Students

Phillip L. Waalkes, University of Missouri-St. Louis, Emily Woodruff, Madison, Wisconsin, Daniel A. DeCino, University of South Dakota, and Jaimie Stickl Haugen, St. Bonaventure University

Abstract

Conceptualization can inform school counselors’ work with students including about cultural and environmental influences on student success. Yet, there is limited research about school counselors’ conceptualizations of their students. We used qualitative content analysis to examine a nationwide sample of school counselors’ (N = 174) descriptions of students. The predominantly White participants described their students from largely individualistic perspectives with limited mentions of context and cultural identities and counseling theory. To develop contextual thinking and theory-driven conceptualizations, school counselors can reflect upon how privilege and marginalization influence them and their students and form consultation groups with other school counselors. 

Citation

Waalkes, P. L., Woodruff, E., DeCino, D. A., & Huagen, J. S. (2021). School counselors’ conceptualizations of their students. Journal of School Counseling, 19(28). http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v19n28.pdf

 

Volume 19, Number 29:

School Counselor Roles for Student Success During a Pandemic

Robert Pincus, Liberty University, Denise Ebersol, Liberty University, Judith Justice, Indiana Wesleyan University, TeShaunda Hannor-Walker, Liberty University, and Leonis Wright, Governors State University

Abstract

Amidst the COVID-19 pandemic and restrictions, school counselors continue to provide necessary mental health services, support, prevention, intervention, and referrals, as needed, to the increasing number of PK-12 students with mental health needs. School counselors are essential mental health professionals who provide developmentally appropriate, comprehensive, and evidence-based support for all students across education settings including in-person, blended, and virtual formats. Through their ongoing leadership, advocacy, collaboration, and systemic change, school counselors strive to ensure that their roles and responsibilities include supporting the mental health needs of students especially now that those needs have been exacerbated by COVID-19. Adverse childhood experiences during the pandemic have resulted in a need for additional early identification, prevention, and interventions to address the increasing mental health needs of students. Recommendations for more effectively addressing the mental health and social emotional needs of students are included as are suggestions for increasing advocacy for school counselor roles and responsibilities, evidence-based assessments, and the utilization of technology. Finally, the authors conclude by affirming that school counselors should be viewed as essential mental health professionals who are prepared to support the social emotional and behavioral health of students now more than ever when students need support overcoming COVID-19 related obstacles, stressors and trauma-inducing situations.

Citation

Pincus, R., Ebersol, D., Justice, J., Hannor-Walker, T., & Wright, L. (2021). School Counselor Roles for Student Success during a pandemic. Journal of School Counseling, 19(29). http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v19n29.pdf

 

Volume 19, Number 30:

Exploring Factors that Affect School Counselors’ Use of Time

Michelle W. Brasfield, The University of Memphis, Chloe Lancaster, University of South Florida, and Martha F. Burke, The University of Memphis

Abstract

American School Counselor Association (ASCA) advocates for school counselors to allocate 80% of their time to direct and supportive services to students and against non-counseling duties inconsistent with the ASCA National Model. For this exploratory study, we investigated how time allocations were impacted by non-counseling duties, school characteristics, and the presence of supportive services for 143 public school counselors. Results indicated that time allocations were impacted by grade level, non-counseling duties, Title I status, school enrollment, and the existence of supportive personnel. Implications for school counseling advocacy and areas of future research are addressed.

Citation

Brasfield, M. W., Lancaster, C., & Burke, M. F. (2021). Exploring factors that affect school counselors’ use of time. Journal of School Counseling, 19(30). http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v19n30.pdf

 

Volume 19, Number 31:

Using Acceptance and Commitment Therapy to Support a Multi-Tiered System of School Counseling Supports

Matthew J. Beck, Western Illinois University-Quad Cities, Erin M. D. Lane, Western Illinois University-Quad Cities, and Ashley Dodson, Moline-Coal Valley School District No. 40 

Abstract

There is a dearth of existing literature pertaining to the use of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) in school counseling; which may be beneficial when addressing student concerns such as social anxiety and decreased social networks. This article discusses the overlap of ACT with comprehensive school counseling programs and culminates with a case study highlighting the role of school counselors in using an ACT-informed tiered plan to address students’ social-emotional needs following a crisis situation

Citation

Beck, M. J., Lane, E. M. D., & Dodson, A. (2021). Using acceptance and commitment therapy to support a multi-tiered system of school counseling supports. Journal of School Counseling, 19(31). http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v19n31.pdf

 

Volume 19, Number 32:

Non-Suicidal Self-Injury (NSSI): What School Counselors Need to Know to Support their Students

Laura Barbour, Lewis & Clark College, Nikki Correa, University of Southern Maine, and Emily Sallee, University of Montana

Abstract

Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) is defined as intentional self-inflicted damage to the surface of the body without suicidal intent. Research shows that approximately 15% of adolescents engage in NSSI behaviors, necessitating school counselors with the knowledge and skills to respond systemically and systematically. Five functions of NSSI have been identified, including: (a) affect regulation (anxiety, anger, frustration, depression); (b) change cognitions (distraction from problems, stopping suicidal thoughts); (c) self-punishment; (d) stop dissociation; and (e) interpersonal (secure care and attention, fit in with peers) (Peterson et al., 2008). As educational leaders and mental health professionals, school counselors are in a unique position to educate school personnel, accept referrals, provide responsive services, and provide referrals to address non-suicidal self-injury of students (American School Counselor Association, 2017). This article will describe how school counselors can respond to NSSI, briefly reviewing recent literature in training and education, NSSI protocols, and interventions used in school settings.

Citation

Barbour, L., Correa, N., & Sallee, E. (2021). Non-suicidal self injury (NSSI): What school counselors need to know to support their students. Journal of School Counseling, 19(32). http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v19n32.pdf

 

Volume 19, Number 33:

Anxiety-Based School Refusal: Implications for School Counselors

Jillian Guerra and David Bright State University of New York at New Paltz

Abstract

School attendance problems (SAPs) have traditionally been viewed as a result of behavioral challenges in student populations. Increasing evidence suggests, however, that a substantial portion of SAPs and school refusal behaviors are related to underlying anxiety in students. The school counselor, as an advocate for all students, is well-positioned to transform school response to SAPs and school refusal behavior to anxiety-informed approaches. This conceptual article reviews the literature surrounding anxiety-based SAPs and school refusal and suggests approaches for school counselors to implement in their districts.

Citation

Guerra, J., & Bright, D. (2021). Anxiety-based school refusal: Implications for school counselors. Journal of School Counseling, 19(33). http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v19n33.pdf

Volume 19, Number 34:

Raising Youth Critical Consciousness: Exploring Critical Race Pedagogy as a Framework for Anti-Racist Programming

Deanna Burgess, DePaul University, Diandra J. Prescod, University of Connecticut, and Julia Bryan and Seriashia Chatters, Pennsylvania State University 

Abstract

School counselors are challenged to cultivate critical consciousness (CC) among youth engaged in anti-racist advocacy (American School Counselor Association. (2016; Ieva et al., 2021; Moss & Singh, 2015; Ratts et al., 2007; Singh et al., 2010). However, review of youth-led anti-racist initiatives reveals a lack of clarity regarding intervention factors that promote consciousness. Recognizing this void, we turn to critical race pedagogy (CRP) as a potential framework for systematizing elements of CC development within advocacy interventions. The current study examines the effects of an anti-racist youth advocacy program grounded in CRP on the development of CC. Results demonstrate significant gains in consciousness among participating adolescents and provide practical insight into the integration of CRP with anti-racist programming.

Citation

Burgess, D., Prescod, D. J., Bryan, J., & Chatters, S. (2021). Raising youth critical consciousness: Exploring critical race pedagogy as a framework for anti-racist programming. Journal of School Counseling, 19(34). http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v19n34.pdf

Volume 19, Number 35:

School Counselors’ Leading With Self-Compassion

Carleton H. Brown, Anjanette Todd, and Arturo Olivárez, Jr., The University of Texas at El Paso

Abstract

Although school counselors are tasked with assisting others with emotional and mental health needs, there is a paucity of research that examines the training and development of school counselors in self-compassion interventions to handle their own emotional and mental health needs in leadership situations. To address the gap in the literature, a workshop was developed and conducted for school counselors. A series of t-tests (n = 63) were used to examine the impact of the training on school counselors’ leadership awareness and self-compassion. Results from this study indicate that the workshop had a significant impact on school counselor leadership awareness’ dimensions.

Citation

Brown, C. H., Todd, A., & Olivárez, A., Jr. (2021). School counselors’ leading with self-compassion. Journal of School Counseling, 19(35). http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v19n35.pdf

Volume 19, Number 36:

The School Counselor’s Role in Supporting Students with High-Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorder with the Transition to College

Jennifer S. Barna, Marywood University, and Matthew L. Nice, Indiana University of Pennsylvania

Abstract

Students with high-functioning autism spectrum disorder (HASD) have specific challenges that can impede their successful transition from high school to college. The unique expertise of school counselors put them in an ideal position to assist these students with this process. The purpose of this manuscript is to describe the social, communication/self-advocacy, and executive functioning deficits that impact the transition process and identify effective intervention strategies for school counselors.

Citation

Barna, J. S., & Nice, M. L. (2021). The school counselor’s role in supporting students with high-functioning autism spectrum disorder with the transition to college. Journal of School Counseling, 19(36). http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v19n36.pdf

Volume 19, Number 37:

Military-Focused Education and Career Advising: What Professional School Counselors Need to Know

Trish Ramos, Baylor University Melanie S. Meyer, University of North Texas, and Jeff Cranmore, Grand Canyon University 

Abstract

Professional school counselors are tasked with providing information about postsecondary options to high school students and their families. Opportunities in the military offer a variety of benefits; however, misconceptions about military education and career pathways are prevalent among students, families, and educators, so professional school counselors should be aware of these when advising students. The purpose of this paper is to provide professional school counselors with an overview of military service options and the benefits of each, as well as to outline the variety of options for entry into the military via active duty and higher education pathways. The American School Counselor Association’s (ASCA) Professional Standards and Competencies (2019) clearly outline postsecondary advising as a key competency for school-based counseling professionals and as such it is important for counselors to be aware of each of these military options.

Citation

Ramos, T., Meyer, M. S., & Cranmore, J. (2021). Military-focused education and career advising: What professional school counselors need to know. Journal of School Counseling, 19(37). http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v19n37.pdf

Volume 19, Number 38:

Adlerian Consultation: A Model for School Counselors during the COVID-19 Pandemic

Levi McClendon, Texas A & M University - Central Texas, and Timothy Brown & Richard Watts, Sam Houston State University

Abstract

Consultation is one of the primary methods of providing indirect student services and common practices of school counselors. Due to high caseloads and the stress of school shutdowns during COVID-19, consultation remains an important modality to serve teachers and support students. A case study is provided to demonstrate how school counselors can use the Seven Steps of Adlerian Consultation during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Citation

McClendon, L., Brown, T., & Watts, R. (2021). Adlerian consultation: A model for school counselors during the COVID-19 pandemic. Journal of School Counseling, 19(38). http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v19n38.pdf

Volume 19, Number 39:

School Climate and the Principal-Counselor Relationship

Wendy D. Rock, Verna L. Estoque, and Hannah F. Cowan, Southeastern Louisiana University

Abstract

The principal-school counselor relationship and school climate were explored with 279 high school principals in this quantitative study. Pearson's correlations revealed the principal-counselor relationship was significantly positively correlated with three dimensions of school climate: collegial leadership, professional teacher behavior, and achievement press. In addition, three elements of the principal-counselor relationship (mutual trust between the principal and school counselors, a shared vision of what is meant by student success, and mutual respect between the principal and school counselors) were significantly negatively correlated with institutional vulnerability, the fourth dimension of school climate. We discuss implications for principals, school counselors, and others.

Citation

Rock, W. D., Estoque, V. L., & Cowan, H. F. (2021). School climate and the principal-counselor relationship. Journal of School Counseling, 19(39). http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v19n39.pdf

Volume 19, Number 40:

Latinx Students’ Perceptions of School Counseling Activities: A Content Analysis

Maggie M. Parker, Bagmi Das, and Catherine T. Kelly, The George Washington University

Abstract

This article explores 210 Latinx high school student’s perceptions of school counseling activities. Using content analysis, researchers analyzed students’ written answers regarding their perceptions of school counseling activities. The researchers found that Latinx students believed academic and career interventions as most important, while those addressing personal and cultural values less valuable. Implications for school counselors to provide activities aligned with Latinx students’ identified needs and limitations are discussed.

Citation

Parker, M. M., Das, B., & Kelly, C. T. (2021). Latinx students’ perceptions of school counseling activities: A content analysis. Journal of School Counseling, 19(40). http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v19n40.pdf

Volume 19, Number 41:

The Coalition Model Advocating for School Counselors’ Role in Improving Youth Mental Health

Christopher D. Slaten, Sarah A. Owens, Keith C. Herman, Wendy M. Reinke, Brett Rawlings, and Norman C. Gysbers, University of Missouri-Columbia

Abstract

All too often policymakers have called upon teachers to attend to youth mental health in the classroom and school counselors have largely been left out of the discussion. The American School Counseling Association (ASCA) Model (2019) advocates for the practicing role of school counselors in providing direct service to youth. The Coalition model presented in this paper is a way for communities to support school counselors, and vice versa, in providing mental health services to youth in schools.

Citation

Slaten, C. D., Owens, S. A., Herman, K. C., Reinke, W. M., Rawlings, B., and Gysbers, N.C. (2021). The coalition model advocating for school counselors’ role in improving youth mental health. Journal of School Counseling, 19(41). http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v19n41.pdf

Volume 19, Number 42:

Examining the Mental Health Impacts of COVID-19 on K-12 Mental Health Providers, School Teachers, and Students

Nikki Correa, University of Southern Maine and Jennifer M. First, University of Tennessee, Knoxville

Abstract

The COVID-19 crisis has caused a major disruption to students and staff within schools. As a result, COVID-19 has likely had a negative impact on mental health. This study investigated via an online survey, the mental health impact of the COVID-19 crisis on school counselors, teachers, and school social workers. In addition, the study examined these staff members’ perspectives on the mental health of the students they worked with. Results indicated students are displaying a variety of distress behavior ranging from fearfulness, loss of temper, and peer problems. Staff indicated they felt confident reassuring students of safety, answering questions about COVID-19, and asking about students’ families or friends who were affected. However, staff indicated decreased confidence to mention counseling services to students. Also, during the pandemic almost half of school staff indicated experiencing moderate to severe depression, and most staff indicated experiencing moderate to severe anxiety. These findings highlight the importance of providing mental health outside of the school setting, and the need for mental health services for school staff and students in the wake of the COVID-19 crisis.

Citation

Correa, N., & First, J. M. (2021). Examining the mental health impacts of COVID-19 on K-12 mental health providers, school teachers, and students. Journal of School Counseling, 19(42). http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v19n42.pdf

Volume 19, Number 43:

School Counseling Through a Developmental Lens: Implications for Working with Adolescent Girls

Dana L. Brookover, University of Scranton, Mary A. Hermann, Virginia Commonwealth University, and Michael E. Deitz, The College of William and Mary

Abstract

In order to support adolescent girls’ social and emotional development, school counselors need to understand girls’ current experiences and developmental needs. Researchers used phenomenological methodology to explore the experiences of 11 girls in Generation Z. They further examined girls’ interactions with their high school counselors including whether these interactions supported their development. Five themes emerged: developmental challenges; societal impact on development; strengths and protective qualities; experiences with school counselors; and suggestions for school counselors. Implications of these findings are provided.

Citation

Brookover, D. L., Hermann, M. A., & Deitz, M. E. (2021). School counseling through a developmental lens: Implications for working with adolescent girls. Journal of School Counseling, 19(43). http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v19n43.pdf

Volume 19, Number 44:

A Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the School Counseling Program Implementation Survey

Jacob Olsen, California State University Long Beach, and Sejal Parikh-Foxx and Claudia Flowers, University of North Carolina at Charlotte

Abstract

Researchers analyzed data from a national sample of American School Counselor Association (ASCA) members practicing in elementary, middle, secondary, or K-12 school settings (N = 4,598) to test the underlying structure of the School Counseling Program Implementation Survey (SCPIS). Using both confirmatory and bifactor analyses, results suggested that a three-factor model had the best fit for the data. The SCPIS provides practicing school counselors, state and district leaders, counselor educators, and researchers with a psychometrically sound measure of ASCA National Model implementation. 

Citation

Olsen, J., Parikh-Foxx, S., & Flowers, C. (2021). A confirmatory factor analysis of the school counseling program implementation survey. Journal of School Counseling, 19(44). http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v19n44.pdf

Volume 19, Number 45:

Rural Male Social Scripts on Career Development

David Bright, State University of New York at New Paltz

Abstract

While rural students have increased barriers to college and career development than non-rural students and lower educational outcomes, limited research exists on influences on rural career development. Rural males indicate lower college and career aspirations than rural females and are at risk of reduced career outcomes. This study utilizes phenomenology to explore the career influences on rural males and conceptualizes results under a social cognitive career framework to inform future school counseling practice and research. 

Citation

Bright, D. (2021). Rural male social scripts on career development. Journal of School Counseling, 19(45). http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v19n45.pdf

Volume 19, Number 46:

Preparing Professional School Counselors to Work with Student Athletes

Jacqueline Stahlke, Victor Valley College and Jeff Cranmore, Grand Canyon University

Abstract

Professional school counselors play a role in helping students and families make college decisions. One student group that may have unique challenges are student athletes who wish to compete at the collegiate level. These students have additional requirements, beyond traditional admission procedures, to meet eligibility requirements. The purpose of this article is to provide professional school counselors guidance and best practices to support these students. As requirements may change, it is important that professional school counselors, especially those at the high school level, remain up to date in training and their understanding of specific policies, credit requirements, and timelines to support student athletes.

Citation

Stahlke, J. & Cranmore, J. (2021). Preparing professional school counselors to work with student athletes. Journal of School Counseling, 19(46). http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v19n46.pdf

Volume 19, Number 47:

Career Development Through Children's Storybooks

Lisen C. Roberts, Western Carolina University 

Abstract

Professional school counselors have the expectation and responsibility to provide career development to elementary school children. This resource brief presents 13 career-oriented children’s storybooks with nine corresponding classroom activity suggestions.

Citation

Roberts, L. C. (2021). Career development through children's storybooks. Journal of School Counseling, 19(47). http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v19n47.pdf

Volume 19, Number 48:

Real Meaningful Change Comes from Building Relationships”: School Counselor’s Experiences Implementing Restorative Practices

Lance C. Smith, Alexandra Herbert, Amanda Payne, University of Vermont, Nicholas Grudev, Crossroads Program, and Stephanie S. Volkmar, Bernice R. Garnett, Fern Aguda-Brown, University of Vermont

Abstract

To better understand school counselors’ experiences related to implementing restorative practices (RP) in schools, the authors conducted a qualitative study with eight practicing school counselors working in schools that were in the early phases of implementation. Four major themes emerged from the Consensual Qualitative Research methodological analysis of the data: enthusiasm and optimism for a relational approach to education; goodness-of-fit between school counselor identity and the RP way of being; potential for advancing equity; and challenges. Drawing from these themes, this article presents implications for school counseling training, practice, and research.

Citation

Smith, L. C., Herbert, A., Payne, A., Grudev, N., Volkmar, S. S., Garnett, B. R., & Aguda-Brown, F. (2021) Real meaningful change comes from building relationships”: School counselor’s experiences implementing restorative practices. Journal of School Counseling, 19(48). http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v19n48.pdf

Volume 19, Number 49:

An Investigation of Factors Contributing to Secondary Traumatic Stress in School Counselors: A Pilot Study

Jordon J. Beasley, University of North Georgia and Elizabeth K. Norris, Denver Seminary

Abstract

School counselors often experience high levels of stress that may result from a variety of factors including multiple job responsibilities, role ambiguity, high caseloads, limited clinical supervision, and exposure to students who have experienced trauma (DeMato & Curcio, 2004; Lambie, 2007; McCarthy et al., 2010; Rumsey, 2017; Mullen & Gutierrez, 2016). This article reports findings from a pilot study that further explored the relationship between counselor activities and demographic variables on school counselors’ (N=55) levels of secondary traumatic stress after controlling for burnout and years of experience. Findings indicate that overall secondary traumatic stress was low to moderate with Coordination and Other activities significantly influencing the outcome. This brings attention to the contributing factors of secondary traumatic stress in school counselors that can inform educational training, wellness interventions, and environmental supports for school counselors. This pilot study resulted in encouraging findings and future implications are discussed. 

Citation

Beasley, J. J., & Norris, E. K. (2021). An investigation of factors contributing to secondary traumatic stress in school counselors: A pilot study. Journal of School Counseling, 19(49). http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v19n49.pdf

Volume 19, Number 50:

Meaning Ascribed to Career Development Activities by Recent High School Graduates: A Phenomenological Study

Julie Silipo and Katrina Caldon-Ruggles, Adams State University

Abstract

In the last decade, Colorado has increased its efforts and requirements around postsecondary and workforce readiness through the implementation of Individual Career and Academic Plans (ICAP) in high schools (CDE, 2009; CDE, 2014; CDE, 2020). Although based on career development research, no studies have inquired as to the meaning students make through ICAP.  Eight Colorado high school graduates were interviewed to examine the meaning students ascribe to their high school career development. The qualitative study identified four categories in which students assign meaning: Experiential Activities, Professional Skills, Significant Relationships, and Relevance.  The article provides application recommendations for school counselors.

Citation

Silipo, J. & Caldon-Ruggles, K. (2021). Meaning ascribed to career development activities by recent high school graduates: A phenomenological study. Journal of School Counseling, 19(50). http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v19n50.pdf

Volume 19, Number 51:

School Counselors’ Use of Multicultural and Social Justice Counseling Competencies (MSJCC) Leadership Framework in Title I School Settings

Angel Dowden, Nicole Anderson, and Lanessa McCloud, North Carolina A&T State University

Abstract

School counselors have been called to be leaders in K-12 schools (ASCA, 2012; Education Trust National Center for Transforming School Counseling, 2009). School counseling leadership emphasizes the promotion of equitable academic achievement, career development and social/emotional development for all students. To do this, school counselors must be culturally competent, socially just, and able to advocate for the needs of the diverse students served. School counselors working in Title I schools are uniquely challenged as the population served is often vulnerable, disadvantaged, or marginalized. This article promotes the use of the Multicultural and Social Justice Counseling Competencies (MSJCC) as a leadership framework to assist school counselors in their leadership development and equity work for students - specifically in Title I schools.

Citation

Dowden, A., Anderson, N., & McCloud, L. (2021). School counselors’ use of multicultural and social justice counseling competencies (MSJCC) leadership framework in Title I school settings. Journal of School Counseling, 19(51). http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v19n51.pdf

Volume 19, Number 52:

The Role of School Counselors Working with Students in Foster Care: Increasing Access to Postsecondary Educational Opportunities

Lorri M. Capizzi and Emily Bruce, San José State University

Abstract

With school reform efforts underway, students in foster care are in sharper focus as a subgroup and districts are now being held accountable for academic achievement for these youth. School counselors play a key role in the effort to increase rates of postsecondary enrollment and are often a primary support for academic planning, resource connectivity, and college readiness for students in care. The purpose of this article is to inform professional school counselors and counselor trainers about the unique needs of students in foster care. Highlighted are 6 areas of focus and recommendations for school counselors to increase access to postsecondary educational opportunities for students in foster care.

Citation

Capizzi, L. M. & Bruce, E. (2021). The role of school counselors working with students in foster care: Increasing access to postsecondary educational opportunities. Journal of School Counseling, 19(52). http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v19n52.pdf

Volume 19, Number 53:

What is your Superpower?: An Elementary Group Using Bibliotherapy with Diverse Fourth and Fifth Grade Boys

Timothy “T.J.” Schoonover, Margaret Hindman, Kristi Perryman, and Jena Anderson, University of Arkansas

Abstract

School counselors need creative interventions to engage students in small groups. With students’ interests changing quickly, one thing that has remained constant has been a fascination with comic books. They offer an enjoyable and creative way to engage children with stories that resonate with them. Additionally, bibliotherapy is an accessible and easy to implement strategy for children of all ages. This article will discuss the utilization of a comic book in a superhero bibliotherapy group with a diverse group of fourth and fifth grade students from a Gestalt perspective.

Citation

Schoonover, T. J., Hindman, M., Perryman, K., & Anderson, J. (2021). What is your superpower?: An elementary group using bibliotherapy with diverse fourth and fifth grade boys. Journal of School Counseling, 19(53). http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v19n53.pdf

Volume 19, Number 54:

Perceptions of Junior High Students of Animal-Assisted Interventions for School Connectedness and School Climate 

Rebecca K. Weinbaum, Lamar University and M. Kimberly Pruitt, Region 6 ESC Wellness Support Services

Abstract

A growing body of research recognizes animal-assisted interventions (AAI) for increased benefits to students in a range of emotional and psychological needs. In this grounded theory study, researchers investigated students’ experiences of AAI framed by the American School Counseling Association (2014) Mindset & Behavior Standards.  Results revealed wellness factors for a collective sense of ownership and school climate. Implications include use of AAI as a strength-based approach within a Response to Intervention framework.

Citation

Weinbaum, R. K., Pruitt, M. K. (2021). Perceptions of junior high students of animal-assisted interventions for school connectedness and school climate. Journal of School Counseling, 19(54). http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v19n54.pdf

Volume 19, Number 55:

A Model of Family Well-Being for School Counselors

Rebecca L. Koltz, Mark D. Nelson, Dawn S. Tarabochia, and Anna Elliott, Montana State University 

Abstract

Collaboration between school counselors and families has increasingly been identified as a benefit to student success and well-being. This expansion of roles is reflected within school counseling standards as families and parents comprise one-third of the types of collaboration promoted by the ASCA National Model. Further, ASCA’s program foundation cites the importance of families and parents in the ASCA School Counselor Professional Standards and Competencies. In addition to a family focus within the standards of school counseling, family well-being has been associated with overall student wellness. Therefore, the purpose of this article is to provide school counselors with a model of family well-being that will serve as an organizing framework to help school counselors understand and conceptualize families and their well-being. Additionally, the authors provide strategies for school counselors to implement the organizing framework into the school environment.

Citation

Koltz, R. L., Nelson, M. D., Tarabochia, D. S., & Elliott, A. (2021). A model of family well-being for school counselors. Journal of School Counseling, 19(55). http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v19n55.pdf

Volume 19, Number 56:

The Impact of Training in Action Research on School Counseling Students’ Data Attitudes and Data Self-Efficacy

Merry Leigh Dameron, Western Carolina University, Jennifer Perry, Georgia Southern University, Rachel Saunders, University of Cincinnati, and Sejal P. Foxx, University of North Carolina at Charlotte

Abstract

Using data to drive decision-making and evaluate program effectiveness is paramount to the school counseling profession. In this pilot study, researchers utilized a quasi-experimental design to examine the impact of training in action research on students’ data attitudes and self-efficacy. Participants in the experimental group saw greater increases in data self-efficacy, but not data attitudes, than control group members. 

Citation

Dameron, M. L., Perry, J., Saunders, R., & Foxx, S. P. (2021). The impact of training in action research on school counseling students’ data attitudes and data self-efficacy. Journal of School Counseling, 19(56). http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v19n56.pdf

Volume 19, Number 57:

Place Attachment and Academic Aspirations in Rural Elementary Students

David Bright, State University of New York at New Paltz and Isak Kim, University of Nebraska Omaha

Abstract

Limited research exists on rural student academic aspirations from a counseling perspective. Much of the existing research focuses on the high school years and their implications for college. This study explores the relationship between place attachment, academic self-efficacy, and academic aspirations in rural elementary students. The sample consisted of 96 students in the 4th through 6th grades across two elementary schools in the northeastern United States. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses indicated that academic self-efficacy was significantly related to academic aspirations after controlling for sociodemographic variables. Contrary to the researcher’s hypothesis, place attachment failed to have a significant relationship with academic aspirations after academic self-efficacy was entered into the model. However, place attachment moderated the relationship between academic self-efficacy and academic aspirations. The discussion section further explores these results and their implications for school counselors, counselor educators, and counseling researchers.

Citation

Bright, D., & Kim, I. (2021). Place attachment and academic aspirations in rural elementary students. Journal of School Counseling, 19(57). http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v19n57.pdf

Volume 19, Number 58:

Interventions for School Counselors Encountering COVID-19 Impacts

Julia Chibbaro, University of West Georgia and Melissa Mecadon-Mann, Auburn University 

Abstract

As the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on children and adolescents become apparent, school counselors and educators must work together to identify students who may be suffering. As a student advocate and leader within their schools, school counselors are in an optimal position to offer interventions and strategies that may be helpful to students, parents, administrators and teachers. Collaboration and coordination between schools and communities is also necessary for school counselors to be successful in helping students develop resiliency surrounding the impacts of COVID-19.

Citation

Chibbaro, J., & Mecadon-Mann, M. (2021). Interventions for school counselors encountering COVID-19 impacts. Journal of School Counseling, 19(58). http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v19n58.pdf