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The articles published in JSC are indexed in ERIC (Education Resources Information Center).


2019

Volume 17, Number 1: 

An Exploration of Supervision Training Opportunities for School Counselors

Leslie Neyland-Brown, Wright State University, John M. Laux and Jennifer L. Reynolds, The University of Toledo, Kelly Kozlowski, Walden University, and Nick J. Piazza, The University of Toledo 

Abstract

The Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (2016) and the American School Counselor Association (2016) require supervisors to have “relevant” training in supervision, but do not specify the type of training that should be acquired. This study determines if site supervisors who have had formal training in supervision, as indicated by graduate coursework, report higher self-efficacy and receive higher ratings on evaluations from school counseling internship students than site supervisors who have not. We found no effect of supervision training on school counselor interns’ (n = 60) supervisor ratings using the Student Counselor Evaluation of Supervisor form (Boylan, Malley, & Reilly, 2001). Supervisors (n = 58) who had training (e.g., in-services, continuing education, modules of graduate coursework, university workshop) rated themselves higher on the Site Supervisor Self-Efficacy Survey (DeKruyf & Pehrsson, 2011) than supervisors who had no training and those who completed a graduate supervision course. 

Citation

Neyland-Brown, L., Laux, J. M., Reynolds, J. L., Kozlowski, K., & Piazza, N. J. (2019). An exploration of supervision training opportunities for school counselors. Journal of School Counseling, 17(1). Retrieved from http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v17n1.pdf 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 17, Number 2: 

School Counselors Promoting College and Career Readiness for High School Students

Allison C. Paolini, Winthrop University 

Abstract

This article describes the pivotal role that school counselors play in preparing and helping students feel prepared and equipped to enter the workforce upon graduation. This brief commentary addresses the necessity for school counselors to work collaboratively with their students, so they are knowledgeable about college and career exploration. In addition, best practices that provide students with the insight, tools, and resources necessary to succeed in the workforce after graduation are presented. 

Citation

Paolini, A. C. (2019). School counselors promoting college and career readiness for high school students. Journal of School Counseling, 17(2). Retrieved from http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/
articles/v17n2.pdf 

Type of Article

Current Issues

 

Volume 17, Number 3: 

A Content Analysis of School Counselors’ Legal Experiences Through Self-Reflective Letter Writing

Daniel A. DeCino, University of South Dakota, Phillip L. Waalkes, University of Missouri- St. Louis, and W. Bradley McKibben, Nova Southeastern University 

Abstract

School counselors can write letters to themselves to practice self-reflection and enhance learning from experience. Using inductive and deductive content analysis, we analyzed how twelve school counselors used letters to themselves to reflect on their legal experiences. In their letters, participants demonstrated a wide range of depth in dimensions of self-reflection. Implications for future and current school counselors’ self-reflective practices are provided. 

Citation

DeCino, D. A., Waalkes, P. L., & McKibben, W. B. (2019). A content analysis of school counselors’ legal experiences through self-reflective letter writing. Journal of School Counseling, 17(3). Retrieved from http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v17n3.pdf 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 17, Number 4: 

The Role of School Counselors in Supporting Mental Health Models in Schools

Dakota L. King-White, Cleveland State University 

Abstract

Many K-12 students face mental health challenges that affect them academically, socially, and emotionally. These challenges include anxiety, depression, trauma, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. While research on mental health models in school settings exists, specific attention has not been given to the role of school counselors in supporting mental health models in schools (Lynn, McKay McKernan, & Atkins, 2003; Mellin et al., 2010; Messina, Kolbert, Hyatt-Burkhart, & Crothers, 2015; Splett & Maras, 2011). This article explores strategies that school counselors can use to support mental health models within the K-12 academic setting. 

Citation

King-White, D. L. (2019). The role of school counselors in supporting mental health models in schools. Journal of School Counseling, 17(4). Retrieved from http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/
articles/v17n4.pdf 

Type of Article

Current Issues

 

Volume 17, Number 5: 

LGBT Families and School Community Partnerships: A Critical Role for School Counselors

Matthew J. Beck, Western Illinois University-Quad Cities, and Haley D. Wikoff, University of Iowa 

Abstract

School-family-community partnerships are associated with positive educational outcomes for students and families. However, there are limited interventions available to assist school counselors in building effective school-family-community relationships with lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender parents/guardians and their children. This article outlines strategies that school counselors can implement to enhance the partnerships between school communities and LGBT-headed families across the student, school, and community levels. 

Citation

Beck, M. J., & Wikoff, H. D. (2019). LGBT families and school community partnerships: A critical role for school counselors. Journal of School Counseling, 17(5). Retrieved from http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v17n5.pdf 

Type of Article

Innovative Methods

 

Volume 17, Number 6: 

Exploring the Impact of a Positive Psychology Intervention with Latina/o Adolescents

Javier Cavazos Vela, Christian Garcia, and James Whittenberg, University of Texas Rio Grande Valley, James Ikonomopoulos, Texas A&M University-Kingsville, and Stacey L. Gonzalez, Brownsville, TX 

Abstract

Latina/o adolescents may begin middle school with lower levels of life satisfaction, hope, and self-compassion. In the current study, a small-series (N = 5) single-case research design was implemented to evaluate the impact of a positive psychology group counseling experience to increase Latina/o adolescents’ life satisfaction, hope, and self-compassion. Analysis of participants’ scores on outcome measures yielded treatment effects indicating that the positive psychology group counseling experience may be effective for increasing hope, life satisfaction, and self-compassion. Given that the positive psychology approach was a promising approach for improving Latina/o adolescents’ positive outcomes, implications for school counselors to integrate positive psychology into treatment processes are presented. 

Citation

Vela, J. C., Garcia, C., Whittenberg, J., Ikonomopoulos, J., & Gonzalez, S. L. (2019). Exploring the impact of a positive psychology intervention with Latina/o adolescents. Journal of School Counseling, 17(6). Retrieved from http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v17n6.pdf 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 17, Number 7: 

Lessons Learned From an Inner-City Boys Trauma Group

Jason D. Reynolds (Taewon Choi), Seton Hall University, Joshua M. Henderson, St. Barnabas Hospital, and Amelio A. D’Onofrio, Fordham University 

Abstract

This article describes a study of two male clinicians’ implementation of a 10-week, school-based integrated cognitive-behavioral group counseling intervention with psychodynamic process elements at a school in the Bronx, NY for inner-city middle school boys who have experienced complex trauma. The authors define complex trauma and describe the therapeutic concepts that framed their work with students over the course of an academic year. Through case study methodology, the authors offer lessons learned about a pilot intervention treating complex trauma in an underserved inner-city school through their observations, clinical notes, and clinical supervision. Suggestions are provided to counselors for cultivating a therapeutic space amid the often disruptive environment of middle school, with special emphasis on how counselors may develop trust and may increase resiliency for middle school boys within interpersonally aggressive academic environments and inner-city neighborhoods. 

Citation

Reynolds J. D., Henderson, J. M., & D’Onofrio, A. A. (2019). Lessons learned from an inner-city boys trauma group. Journal of School Counseling, 17(7). Retrieved from http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/
articles/v17n7.pdf 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 17, Number 8: 

Promoting Girls’ Leadership Development in Secondary Schools

Cheryl L. Fulton, Jennifer H. Greene, Elizabeth Kjellstrand Hartwig, Sarah M. Blalock, and Maria Haiyasoso, Texas State University 

Abstract

Leadership programs and services have burgeoned over the past decade to encourage greater representation in leadership among girls and teens. Yet, little is known about the prevalence and type of girls’ leadership programs or services adopted in secondary schools, whether they are perceived as important or effective by school counselors, or what barriers exist to prevent adoption of such programs. Based on an online survey of 239 school counselors, we explored the promotion of girls’ leadership within the education system. We also offered implications for girls’ leadership promotion in the schools and suggestions for future research. 

Citation

Fulton, C. L., Greene, J. H., Hartwig, E. K., Blalock, S. M., & Haiyasoso, M. (2019). Promoting girls’ leadership development in secondary schools. Journal of School Counseling, 17(8). Retrieved from http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v17n8.pdf

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 17, Number 9: 

Exploring How School Counselors Practice Self-Compassion

Anjanette Todd, University of Texas at El Paso, and Hiba Chehaib, University of South Florida 

Abstract

Providing compassionate care is of utmost importance when school counselors serve students, especially in times of crisis. School counselors should practice self-compassion in order to be compassionate toward others, which they may find challenging. This challenge could be caused by occupational stressors such as limited opportunities for clinical supervision, high student-counselor ratios, and a lack of clearly defined job roles. This article describes a study wherein seven school counselors explored aspects of self-compassionate behavior (Todd, 2017). A thematic analysis was used to analyze the data and identify themes. Results indicated that all seven school counselors integrated self-compassionate behaviors. Themes included: (a) perspectives related to self-compassion, (b) actions related to self-compassion, and (c) resistance in recognizing self-compassion. Based on the results of this study, an enhanced understanding of the role that self-compassion has among counselors in relation to well-being was explored. 

Citation

Todd, A., & Chehaib, H. (2019). Exploring how school counselors practice self-compassion. Journal of School Counseling, 17(9). Retrieved from http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v17n9.pdf 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 17, Number 10: 

Advising High School Students for Admission to College Fine Arts Programs

Jeff Cranmore, Grand Canyon University, Susan D. Adams-Johnson, University of Oklahoma, Joel Wiley, University of North Texas, and Anna Holloway, Langston University 

Abstract

School counselors are a primary source of college and career information for students and families, including students interested in pursuing a degree in fine arts. The admission process to fine arts programs can be complex and involve multiple steps; however, providing this guidance is clearly in line with the role of school counselor, as defined by the American School Counselor Association (ASCA) model for school counseling. This article provides a guide for the fine arts admission process, including finding the right fit, academic requirements, financial assistance, and general strategies. Guidance for specific disciplines such as dance, music, theater, and visual arts are provided. The article includes two appendices of resources that counselors may share with students and families. 

Citation

Cranmore, J., Adams-Johnson, S. D., Wiley, J., & Holloway, A. (2019). Advising high school students for admission to college fine arts programs. Journal of School Counseling, 17(10). Retrieved from http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v17n10.pdf 

Type of Article

Innovative Methods

 

Volume 17, Number 11: 

Exploration of Institutional Theory in One California Central District Office That Shapes College Preparedness and Enrollment

Vernell L. Deslonde, Fontana, California, and Michael D. Becerra, Dallas, Texas 

Abstract

To impact college enrollment rates, and subsequently college attainment throughout the United States, particularly among low socioeconomic status students, college enrollment outcomes must become a priority at the state, district, and school levels. Central school district offices across the United States face demands by educators and policymakers to ensure that students are prepared for college. The way in which central district offices respond will likely be influenced by the availability of resources. Drawing on institutional theory, this exploratory case study examines how one central district office’s funding practices and resource allocations influence college preparedness and enrollment in California. The researchers interviewed central district leaders and high school administrators (N = 10) to explore their perceptions of financial strategies and barriers that impact college preparation and enrollment rates, particularly in California, a state that ranks 40th in college enrollment. The analysis illustrates the resource challenges from the perspective of school administrators that interfere with preparing students for college, such as a limited authority to use site-level funds to hire qualified teachers to meet the instructional needs of their students. Further findings revealed that despite fiscal resources dedicated from this central district office to remove funding barriers that typically interfere with low-income and minority students’ access to college, districts must move beyond the core curriculum to ensure that students are ready for college. 

Citation

Deslonde, V. L., & Becerra, M. D. (2019). Exploration of institutional theory in one California central district office that shapes college preparedness and enrollment. Journal of School Counseling, 17(11). Retrieved from http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v17n11.pdf 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 17, Number 12: 

Factors Associated With Programmatic Orientation and Supervision in Schools

Mariama Cook Sandifer, Prairie View A&M University, and Dottie Martin, Lillian M. Range, and Thomas Fonseca, University of Holy Cross 

Abstract

Programmatic orientation is the level of intentional implementation of school counseling program components that are based on data and are proactive in nature. To explore relationships between school counselor supervision and programmatic orientation, 188 school counselors answered questions regarding the presence of supervision elements and programmatic orientation levels. Results indicated that higher levels of programmatic orientation were associated with higher presence of supervision elements. 

Citation

Sandifer, M. C., Martin, D., Range, L. M., & Fonseca, T. (2019). Factors associated with programmatic orientation and supervision in schools. Journal of School Counseling, 17(12). Retrieved from http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v17n12.pdf 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 17, Number 13: 

The Influence of Personal and Professional Characteristics on School Counselors’ Recognition and Reporting of Child Sexual Abuse

Richard Joseph Behun, Millersville University, Julie A. Cerrito, The University of Scranton, and David L. Delmonico and Jered B. Kolbert, Duquesne University 

Abstract

This study investigated personal and professional predictors of professional school counselors’ (N = 220) accurate recognition and appropriate reporting of child sexual abuse. Additionally, this study examined instances when school counselors suspected child sexual abuse but intentionally elected not to report it and explored considerations that were influential in the decision-making process. Results indicated that personal and professional characteristics of the school counselor did not predict recognition and appropriate reporting of child sexual abuse but did contribute to the decision-making process when deciding to make a mandated report. 

Citation

Behun, R. J., Cerrito, J. A., Delmonico, D. L., & Kolbert, J. B. (2019). The influence of personal and professional characteristics on school counselors’ recognition and reporting of child sexual abuse. Journal of School Counseling, 17(13). Retrieved from http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/
articles/v17n13.pdf 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 17, Number 14: 

School Counselor Site Supervisors’ Perceptions of Preparedness and Training Needs

Grace W. Wambu, New Jersey City University, and Charles E. Myers, Eastern Kentucky University 

Abstract

The importance of school counselor site supervisor training has gained considerable attention in the past couple of years; however, despite these efforts, little progress seems to have been made. This study explores school counselor site supervisors’ perceptions of preparedness, training needs, and preferred methods of future training. Results of the study revealed that most participants did not receive supervision training during their graduate program preparation. Implications for training site supervisors and future research are discussed. 

Citation

Wambu, G. W., & Myers, C. E. (2019). School counselor site supervisors’ perceptions of preparedness and training needs. Journal of School Counseling, 17(14). Retrieved from http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/
articles/v17n14.pdf 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 17, Number 15: 

Stay-at-Home Dads’ Experiences With Their Children’s Elementary Schools

Eric S. Davis, Jennifer Wolgemuth, and Steven Haberlin, University of South Florida, Vernon S. Smith, Monmouth University, and Sharlene Smith, Piscataway, New Jersey 

Abstract

The role of fathers in elementary education has shifted drastically in recent years. In particular, stay-at-home dads (SAHDs) have become more relevant in the lives of children. Despite these changes, there remains a paucity of research on SAHDs’ experiences with their children’s schools. This qualitative study examined SAHDs’ perceptions of and experiences with their children’s schools. The research identified three themes: (a) involvement, (b) interactions, and (c) communication. The researchers discuss implications for elementary school counseling practice as well as future areas of research. 

Citation

Davis, E. S., Wolgemuth, J., Haberlin, S., Smith, V. S., & Smith, S. (2019). Stay-at-home dads’ experiences with their children’s elementary schools. Journal of School Counseling, 17(15). Retrieved from http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v17n15.pdf 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 17, Number 16: 

Trends and Influential Factors in Child Abuse Reporting: Implications for Early Career School Counselors

Lacey Ricks, Liberty University, Malti Tuttle, Auburn University, and Christy Land and Julia Chibbaro, University of West Georgia 

Abstract

This study used quantitative measures to explore child abuse reporting trends for early career school counselors and to examine factors influencing their decisions to report suspected child abuse. Thematic coding was used to analyze recommendations for additional training needs regarding child abuse reporting and for the challenges school counselors faced regarding mandated reporting. Participants completed online surveys to assess their experiences. Factors found to influence school counselors’ decisions to report suspected child abuse included school counselors’ self-efficacy levels, academic setting, and students’ participation in the schools’ free or reduced lunch program. Qualitative results were also reviewed. 

Citation

Ricks, L., Tuttle, M., Land, C., & Chibbaro, J. (2019). Trends and influential factors in child abuse reporting: Implications for early career school counselors. Journal of School Counseling, 17(16). Retrieved from http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v17n16.pdf 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 17, Number 17: 

School Counselors’ Experiences and Practices of Working With Adolescents Who Self-Harm

Ellen A. Roberts, Joan K. Comeau and Kathryn W. Van Asselt, Capella University, and Heather C. Trepal, University of Texas at San Antonio 

Abstract

This study utilized qualitative methodology to provide a rich description and a deeper understanding of the professional experiences and practices of twelve school counselors who work with adolescent students who self-harm. Four themes included: suicidal or non-suicidal, role of the school counselor, referrals, and identified interventions. There is a need for school counselors to gain more training and knowledge regarding effective interventions that are appropriate to use with adolescents who self-injure in the school setting. 

Citation

Roberts, E. A., Comeau, J. K., Van Asselt, K. W., & Trepal, H. C. (2019). School counselors’ experiences and practices of working with adolescents who self-harm. Journal of School Counseling, 17(17). Retrieved from http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v17n17.pdf 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 17, Number 18: 

The Impact of Child Maltreatment on the Educational and Psychological Well-Being of Students

Jonathan Chitiyo, University of Pittsburgh at Bradford, and Zachary Pietrantoni, California State University at East Bay 

Abstract

Child maltreatment continues to be a major health and social welfare problem across the globe. In the United States, millions of children from all socioeconomic backgrounds, across all ages, religions, and cultures are victims of child maltreatment every day and millions more are at risk. Research has consistently shown that exposure to child maltreatment in all its forms negatively affects the current and future educational performance and emotional and psychological well-being of children. The purpose of this paper is to provide a literature synthesis of the impact of child maltreatment on the educational and psychological well-being of students. Recommendations for educators working in school settings are provided. 

Citation

Chitiyo, J., & Pietrantoni, Z. (2019). The impact of child maltreatment on the educational and psychological well-being of students. Journal of School Counseling, 17(18). Retrieved from http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v17n18.pdf 

Type of Article

Current Issues

 

Volume 17, Number 19: 

School Counselors Use of Social Emotional Learning in High School: A Study of the Strong Teens Curriculum

Paul Caldarella, Austin J. Millet, Melissa A. Heath, Jared S. Warren, and Leslie Williams, Brigham Young University 

Abstract

Student mental health problems often emerge in high school; however, such problems frequently go unaddressed. Using a time series design, we evaluated the effects of the Strong Teens social-emotional learning curriculum implemented by three school counselors and two school social workers with 28 high school students identified with internalizing symptoms. Decreases in students’ self-reported levels of internalizing symptoms were statistically significant following the 12-week intervention, indicating moderate improvement. Participants rated the program as socially valid, though they also recommended ways to improve it. Results coincide with past studies indicating that Strong Teens may help reduce adolescents’ self-reported internalizing symptoms. 

Citation

Caldarella, P., Millet, A. J., Heath, M. A., Warren, J. S., & Williams, L. (2019). School counselors use of social emotional learning in high school: A study of the Strong Teens curriculum. Journal of School Counseling, 17(19). Retrieved from http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v17n19.pdf 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 17, Number 20: 

Integrating Wellness Within Group Counseling for Latinx Adolescents

Javier Cavazos Vela, University of Texas Rio Grande Valley, James Ikonomopoulos, Texas A&M University-Kingsville, Christian Garcia and James Whittenberg, University of Texas Rio Grande Valley, and Stacey Lee Gonzalez, Texas A&M University-Kingsville 

Abstract

Latinx adolescents may begin middle school with lower levels of life satisfaction and hope. In the current study, we implemented a small-series (N = 4) single-case research design to evaluate the impact of a group counseling wellness experience to increase Latinx adolescents’ life satisfaction and hope. Analysis of participants’ scores on outcome measures yielded treatment effects indicating that the group counseling wellness experience may be effective for increasing hope and life satisfaction. Implications for school counselors are provided. 

Citation

Vela, J. C., Ikonomopoulos, J., Garcia, C., Whittenberg, J., & Gonzalez, S. L. (2019). Integrating wellness within group counseling for Latinx adolescents. Journal of School Counseling, 17(20). Retrieved from http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v17n20.pdf 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 17, Number 21: 

Substance Use Disorders: What School Counselors Should Know

Edward T. Dunbar Jr., Mark D. Nelson, and Dawn S. Tarabochia 

Abstract

Substance use among school-aged young people is of concern as it relates to student success. School counselors have an opportunity to prevent, educate, and counsel students about substance use. Various models of school counseling, including the ASCA National Model, have encouraged the development of competency-based programs that help students succeed in school and in life. In an effort to inform school counselors, ASCA has developed position statements related to substance abuse. School counselors have reported difficulties in identifying students with substance use issues, working effectively with these students, and developing or teaching curricula associated with substance use. School counselors may benefit from additional training on substance abuse as well as from models that the emphasize student well-being and success. The purpose of this article is to provide school counselors strategies for addressing students’ substance use. The PACES model of student well-being is used to illustrate the influence of substance use on students’ well-being and provide school counselors a framework from which to evaluate, educate, and counsel students regarding substance use. 

Citation

Dunbar, E. T., Jr., Nelson, M. D., & Tarabochia, D. S. (2019). Substance use disorders: What school counselors should know. Journal of School Counseling, 17(21). Retrieved from http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v17n21.pdf 

Type of Article

Current Issues

 

Volume 17, Number 22: 

Digital Awareness: A Model for School Counselors

Julia S. Chibbaro, University of West Georgia, Lacey Ricks, Liberty University, and Bethany Lanier, University of West Georgia

Abstract

As the integration of technology into schools is becoming prevalent, school counselors and educators must work together to identify students who may be suffering from digital addiction. As a student advocate and leader within their schools, school counselors are in an optimal position to educate school staff, students, and community members on the signs and symptoms, dangers, and treatments of digital addiction. Early identification of digital addiction is essential for the wellbeing of all students. 

Citation

Chibbaro, J. S., Ricks, L., & Lanier, B. (2019). Digital awareness: A model for school counselors. Journal of School Counseling, 17(22). Retrieved from http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v17n22.pdf 

Type of Article

Current Issues

 

Volume 17, Number 23: 

Teaching Technology and Tolerance in Tandem: Culturally Responsive Classroom Guidance Interventions

Lucy L. Purgason, Jessica Boyles, and Cassidy Greene, Appalachian State University 

Abstract

Twenty-first century schools are characterized by increasing diversity and use of technology. An opportunity exists for school counselors to utilize technology to create novel and innovative classroom guidance lessons designed to facilitate cultural exploration and promote cultural understanding. This article provides a rationale for how the integration of technology in classroom guidance can be particularly beneficial to immigrant and refugee students. The purpose is to feature three technology tools for use at the elementary, middle, and high school levels. Lesson plans are provided. 

Citation

Purgason, L. L., Boyles, J., & Greene, C. (2019). Teaching technology and tolerance in tandem: Culturally responsive classroom guidance interventions. Journal of School Counseling, 17(23). Retrieved from http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v17n23.pdf 

Type of Article

Innovative Methods

Volume 17, Number 24: 

Good Intentions, Poor Outcomes: Centering Culture and Language Diversity Within Response to Intervention

E. Mackenzie Shell, Clark Atlanta University, Leonissa V. Johnson, Clark Atlanta University, and Yvette Q. Getch, University of South Alabama 

Abstract

Culturally and linguistically diverse students face longstanding issues of inequity within public schools in the United States. Response to intervention (RTI) is one proposed solution that addresses the inequities. As advocates for all students, school counselors possess the training and knowledge to promote fairness and equity within the RTI process. Using critical race theory, the authors present a vignette and conceptualize methods based on school counselors’ education and training that school counselors can use to promote equity within RTI for culturally diverse students

Citation

Shell, E. M., Johnson, L. V., & Getch, Y. Q. (2019). Goodintentions, poor outcomes: Centering culture and language diversity within response to interventionJournal of School Counseling, 17(24). Retrieved from http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v17n24.pdf 

Type of Article

Current Issues

Volume 17, Number 25: 

Emerging Leadership: Mental Health Counseling Competencies for School Counselor Trainees

Vasti P. Holstun, Elizabeth C. Wiggins, and José Miguel Maldonado, Liberty University 

Abstract

School counselors’ training and clinical competencies for providing mental health counseling continues to be a point of debate regarding professional roles and identities. This study focuses on the eight counseling core competencies as defined by the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP). The research study compares the theoretical counseling competencies of school counselor graduates to clinical mental health counselor graduates as measured by the results of the Counselor Preparation Comprehensive Examination (CPCE). The data were retrieved from an archival database that included scores collected over 13 years. Participants include graduate students (N = 682) from a CACREP accredited counselor education program at one public university. A multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) was conducted to examine the significant differences between CPCE total scores and subscales based on program specialty (school counseling versus clinical mental health counseling). Results demonstrated significant differences between the group means for two of the subscales (Helping Relationships and Group Work), with students in clinical mental health counseling scoring higher than students in school counseling.

Citation

Holstun, V. P., Wiggins, E. C.,  & Maldonado, J. M. (2019). Emerging leadership: Mental health counseling competencies for school counselor trainees. Journal of School Counseling, 17(25). Retrieved from http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v17n25.pdf 

Type of Article

Theory and Research


2020

Volume 18, Number 1: 

Supporting Young Children’s Executive Function Skills Through Mindfulness: Implications for School Counselors

Christine J. Lux, Kalli B. Decker, and Chloe Nease, Montana State University

Abstract

Shifting federal educational priorities and increased funding for pre-K means that more school counselors are interacting with and supporting children before kindergarten age in public school settings. One potential area of focus for school counseling with young students is executive function (EF), including emotional and behavioral regulation, noted in the research literature as essential skills that contribute to later school success. This position paper outlines the importance of EF and implications for school counselors, including using mindfulness as an intervention strategy to enhance young learners’ EF in individual and group contexts as part of a school counseling program

Citation

Lux, C. J., Decker, K. B., & Nease, C. (2020). Supporting young children’s executive function skills through mindfulness: Implications for school counselorsJournal of School Counseling, 18(1).  http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v18n1.pdf 

Type of Article

Current Issues

Volume 18, Number 2: 

Current Administrative Perceptions of School Counselors: Kansas Administrators’ Perceptions of School Counselor Duties

Jessica J. Lane and Gregory L. Bohner, Kansas State University, and Alice M. Hinck and Robert L. Kircher, Emporia State University

Abstract

This study examined Kansas administrators regarding their current perceptions of the role of school counselors. The study involved over 500 building administrators from elementary, middle, and high schools across rural, suburban, and urban districts in Kansas. The findings indicate that there is a clear opportunity to educate administrators on the role of professional school counselors and the standards of the profession for which counselors are accountable

Citation

Lane, J. J., Bohner, G. L., Hinck, A. M., & Kircher, R. L. (2020). Current administrative perceptions of school counselors: Kansas administrators’ perceptions of school counselor dutiesJournal of School Counseling, 18(2). http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v18n2.pdf 

Type of Article

Theory and Research


Volume 18, Number 3: 

International College Options: An Influential Professional Development Program for School Counselors

Beth H. Gilfillan, So Rin Kim, and Diandra J. Prescod, The Pennsylvania State University

Abstract

As more students in the US explore college options outside of the country, school counselors need more training to support this exploration and process. International College Options began in 2013 to address this need by providing professional development opportunities for school counselors. This quantitative study examined the program’s influence on school counselors’ work in the college process; results show that participating school counselors found the program helpful to their work with students. Implications for practice and future research are included.

Citation

Gilfillan, B. H., Kim, S. R., & Prescod, D. J. (2020). International college options: An influential professional development program for school counselorsJournal of School Counseling, 18(3). http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v18n3.pdf 

Type of Article

Theory and Research


Volume 18, Number 4: 

Hope for the Hurting: Strategies for School Counselors Working With Heartbroken Students

Merry Leigh Dameron and Russ Curtis, Western Carolina University

Abstract

The dissolution of adolescent romantic relationships can lead to a host of detrimental mental health, academic, and social issues for students. The purpose of this article is to discuss specific ways in which school counselors, using direct and indirect services can support students experiencing the trauma of a severed relationship. The article also emphasizes the importance of partnerships between school counselors, students, parents, teachers, and community practitioners. Two case studies are provided with specific recommendations for how school counselors can assist heartbroken students.

Citation

Dameron, M. L., & Curtis, R. (2020). Hope for the hurting: Strategies for school counselors working with heartbroken studentsJournal of School Counseling, 18(4). http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/
articles/v18n4.pdf 

Type of Article

Innovative Methods


Volume 18, Number 5: 

The Curious Role of Teachers in College Guidance: Are Teachers Institutional Agents of College Access?

Suneal Kolluri, Neil Jacobson, Tattiya Maruco, and Zoë Corwin, University of Southern California

Abstract

A teacher's primary responsibility is the academic skill development of students. However, as detailed in this study, high school students report that they are more likely to reach out to teachers for college guidance than any other adults. Thus, teachers are uniquely positioned as "institutional agents" for students interested in college (Stanton-Salazar, 1997, 2011), but they often lack the training and time to confidently provide college guidance. This mixed-methods study analyzed survey data from students and teachers and interviews with administrators and college counselors to investigate factors that increase the likelihood that teachers support students in navigating college-going processes.

Citation

Kolluri, S., Jacobson, N., Maruco, T., & Corwin, Z. (2020). The curious role of teachers in college guidance: Are teachers institutional agents of college access?Journal of School Counseling, 18(5). http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v18n5.pdf 

Type of Article

Theory and Research


Volume 18, Number 6: 

A Primer on Designing a School Counseling Curriculum

Mark D. Nelson and Dawn S. Tarabochia, Montana State University

Abstract

One of the main contributions of school counselors is the development and designing of school counseling curriculum. Professional standards for the school counseling profession have been created to assist school counselors in the design process. The purpose of this article is to provide school counselors with a primer on designing school counseling curriculum. This article will provide a brief review of literature associated with designing school counseling curriculum and an overview of school counseling curriculum frameworks. Additionally, the article will provide clarification to terms associated with curriculum development, such as domains, standards, and competencies as well as options for school counselors to organize and deliver curriculum. Lastly, this article will provide specific tools and examples to aid for school counselors in the development and design of school counseling curriculum. Specific examples and tools include; examples for planning school counseling curriculum, examples of domains, standards and competencies using the terms outlined with the article, examples for developing assets, a tool to assist school counselors in organizing theme development and classroom activities, and lastly a classroom activity template.

Citation

Nelson, M. D., & Tarabochia, D. S. (2020). A primer on designing a school counseling curriculumJournal of School Counseling, 18(6). http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v18n6.pdf 

Type of Article

Resource Brief


Volume 18, Number 7: 

“I Can’t Help Them Enough” – Secondary School Counselors Preparing Latinx Students for College

Amanda Rutter, University of Northern Colorado, Susan X. Day, University of Houston, Elsa M. Gonzalez, Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi, Dominique T. Chlup, Texas A&M University, and Jorge E. Gonzalez, University of Houston

Abstract

Little is known about the experiences of school counselors in their role of disseminating college information to Latinx students. In this study, ten school counselors provided qualitative data which was then analyzed by the researchers for major themes. Themes highlighted the critical role of social capital: school counselors serve an overwhelming number of students, parental involvement is key, early intervention is crucial, parents and students have misperceptions about college, finances appear to be the largest road block to college access, and fear of leaving home function as a barrier for Latinx students. Findings revealed that school counselors in the study faced challenges of addressing inequality in college access, especially for Latinx first-generation students.

Citation

Rutter, A., Day, S. X., Gonzalez, E. M., Chlup, D. T., & Gonzalez, J. E. (2020). “I can’t help them enough” – secondary school counselors preparing Latinx students for collegeJournal of School Counseling, 18(7). http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v18n7.pdf 

Type of Article

Theory and Research


Volume 18, Number 8: 

Peer Victimization and Loneliness: The Moderating Role of School Connectedness by Gender

JoLynn V. Carney and Isak Kim, The Pennsylvania State University, David Bright, State University of New York, and Richard J. Hazler, The Pennsylvania State University

Abstract

School bullying has a detrimental impact on students, including sense of isolation and diminished school connectedness. The current study adopted social capital theory to examine the role of school connectedness as a moderator on the association between peer victimization and loneliness. A sample of 878 fourth- to sixth-grade elementary school students completed a self-report measure assessing peer victimization from school bullying, loneliness, and school connectedness. For data analyses, 834 cases (51.7% boys) were used after excluding cases with missing values. Data analyses included descriptive statistics, independent t-tests of peer victimization, loneliness, and school connectedness by gender, bivariate correlation analysis, and separate hierarchical linear regression analyses for boys and girls. Results supported existing literature revealing there was a significant mean difference in school connectedness by gender. School connectedness buffered the relationship between peer victimization and loneliness for girls as a moderator, whereas this moderating effect did not appear for boys. Implications for future research and practice are discussed.

Citation

Carney, J.  V., Kim, I., Bright, D., & Hazler, R. J. (2020). Peer victimization and loneliness: The moderating role of school connectedness by genderJournal of School Counseling, 18(8). http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v18n8.pdf 

Type of Article

Theory and Research


Volume 18, Number 9: 

The Measure of Gender Exploration and Commitment and the Role of the School Counselor

Jack D. Simons, Mercy College, and Michael W. Bahr, University of Missouri – St. Louis

Abstract

This study was conducted to develop the Measure of Gender Exploration and Commitment (MGEC), a school counseling and training tool. The MGEC assesses one’s gender exploration and commitment and was normed with a national sample of school counselors. Developing the MGEC involved (a) conducting a literature review, (b) modifying items, and (c) gathering data from school counselors to analyze demographic data and conduct principal component analysis.

Citation

Simons, J. D., & Bahr, M. W. (2020).The measure of gender exploration and commitment and the role of the school counselorJournal of School Counseling, 18(9). http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/
articles/v18n9.pdf 

Type of Article

Theory and Research


Volume 18, Number 10: 

Technology Trends in School Counseling

Tracy Steele and Greg Nuckols, Stanford University, and Carolyn Stone, University of North Florida

Abstract

In this follow-up study, 973 members of the American School Counselor Association (ASCA) were surveyed regarding their use of technology in day-to-day counseling activities. School counselor use of technology for student planning purposes has increased over time, while its use in responsive services has not changed significantly. Counselors now answer email and respond to non-urgent messages outside of work hours less frequently. The authors discuss implications for the future role of technology in school counseling.

Citation

Steele, T., Nuckols, G., & Stone, C. (2020).Technology trends in school counselingJournal of School Counseling, 18(10). http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v18n10.pdf 

Type of Article

Theory and Research


Volume 18, Number 11: 

Using SFBC Group Techniques to Increase Latino Academic Self-Esteem

Justin Brogan, Susana Contreras Bloomdahl, W. Harper Rowlett, and Mardis Dunham, Murray State University

Abstract

A rural middle school in the geographic area between the Midwest to Southern U.S. sought help to motivate their Latino student population to aspire for higher academic goals. The researchers collaborated with the middle school to use solution-focused counseling techniques (Murphy, 2015) in a group format to bolster the self-esteem and ethnic identity of Latino middle school students. The group process and results demonstrated that participants significantly benefited in the areas of ethnic identity and self-esteem. Recommendations for working with multicultural students in school settings are included.

Citation

Brogan, J., Bloomdahl, S. C., Rowlett, W. H., & Dunham, M. (2020).Using SFBC group techniques to increase Latino academic self-esteemJournal of School Counseling, 18(11). http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v18n11.pdf 

Type of Article

Theory and Research


Volume 18, Number 12: 

Reducing Gun Violence in Schools: A School Counselor’s Role

Allison C. Paolini, Winthrop University

Abstract

This article focuses on gun violence in the school setting and the role of the counselor in helping to reduce gun violence. Gun violence in schools has become pervasive for many reasons, including lack of adequate support staff, undiagnosed mental health issues, students who experience isolation, anger, depression, bullying, as well as access to guns and rifles combined with a failure to conduct extensive background checks on purchasers of weapons of mass destruction. This article explores the instrumental role school counselors have in identifying, assisting, supporting, and empowering students who are struggling mentally, behaviorally, socially, and academically. A definition of gun violence, statistics, warning signs of perpetrators, and the impact of gun violence on students, are presented.

Citation

Paolini, A. C. (2020).Reducing gun violence in schools: A school counselor’s roleJournal of School Counseling, 18(12). http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v18n12.pdf 

Type of Article

Current Issues


Volume 18, Number 13: 

Using Creativity in School Counseling: Supporting Adolescent Students With Acquired Disabilities

Lacey Ricks, Liberty University, Korinne Babel, Troy University – Phenix City, and Sarah Kitchens, Liberty University

Abstract

Students with a newly acquired disability may struggle with adjusting to their life post-disability; therefore, they represent a unique facet of students within schools that require specialized services and support by school counselors. Creativity, used by school counselors within therapy sessions, may help promote personal growth and the successful transition of students back into school and home environments after a disability is acquired. This article focuses on narrative therapy, music, art, and drama techniques, as well as creative examples of how to approach transition issues associated with adolescent students who are struggling with newly acquired disabilities.

Citation

Ricks, L., Babel, K., & Kitchens, S. (2020).Using creativity in school counseling: Supporting adolescent students with acquired disabilitiesJournal of School Counseling, 18(13). http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/
articles/v18n13.pdf 

Type of Article

Innovative Methods


Volume 18, Number 14: 

School Counselors Working With Undocumented Students in K-12 School Settings

Anjanette Todd, Crystal Ayala, and Karen Barraza, University of Texas at El Paso

Abstract

Undocumented students face many challenges while trying to navigate through the K-12 educational system. This article emphasizes the educational and personal challenges and traumas this vulnerable student population faces. Using the ecological systems theory (1977) developed by Urie Bronfenbrenner as a framework, two student vignettes will be presented. Both vignettes will provide information on laws and policies that apply to undocumented students as well as highlight counseling interventions to address the stress and trauma that impact their mental health.

Citation

Todd, A., Ayala, C., & Barraza, K. (2020).School counselors working with undocumented students in K-12 school settingsJournal of School Counseling, 18(14). http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/
v18n14.pdf 

Type of Article

Current Issues


Volume 18, Number 15: 

Utilizing the Sanford Harmony Program for Children on the Autism Spectrum

Jennifer Kampmann and Mary Bowne, South Dakota State University

Abstract

This article introduces readers to a collaborative community of practice that implemented the Sanford Harmony curriculum, a curriculum that was implemented at a social skills camp for children who were typical developing, as well as children on the autism spectrum. Even though a small number of families enrolled in the camp, several positive results and benefits emerged after a two-week implementation period. In addition, several potential directions for using the Sanford Harmony curriculum emerged for this type of experience.

Citation

Kampmann, J., & Bowne, M. (2020).Utilizing the Sanford Harmony program for children on the autism spectrumJournal of School Counseling, 18(15). http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/
v18n15.pdf 

Type of Article

Resource Brief


Volume 18, Number 16: 

Teens of Incarcerated Parents: A Group Counseling Intervention for High School Counselors

Jennifer Gerlach, Texas A&M University – Corpus Christi

Abstract

Children and adolescents who experience parental incarceration are faced with significant challenges. Additionally, parental incarceration disproportionally affects African American families and families in urban settings. Due to institutional, economic, and social barriers, access to community mental health services for these affected children and teens is often limited. However, professional school counselors (PSCs) are positioned to fill the gap in services and provide much needed support for these students. This article presents a six-session, small counseling group plan for high school PSCs working with teenagers of incarcerated parents. Additional considerations related to prescreening participants and collecting data are also provided.

Citation

Gerlach, J. (2020).Teens of incarcerated parents: A group counseling intervention for high school counselorsJournal of School Counseling, 18(16). http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v18n16.pdf 

Type of Article

Innovative Methods


Volume 18, Number 17: 

Cyberbullying: New Approaches for School Counselors

Jesse E. Florang, University of Nebraska-Kearney

Abstract

Cyberbullying has become a well-documented problem plaguing the mental health and safety of teenagers in schools. An examination of the literature that includes other complex social/emotional issues provides a framework for more effective cyberbullying prevention and intervention strategies. This article examines current research, highlights existing misconceptions, and re-frames misguided intervention efforts that have prevented school counselors from effectively addressing cyberbullying. Considering these past mistakes and current misconceptions, this article provides a new philosophy with fresh approaches to cyberbullying for school counselors to accurately and appropriately intervene in schools.

Citation

Florang, J. E. (2020).Cyberbullying: New approaches for school counselorsJournal of School Counseling, 18(17). http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v18n17.pdf 

Type of Article

Current Issues


Volume 18, Number 18: 

Using Social Information Processing Theory to Counsel Aggressive Youth

Elizabeth Santone, Laura M. Crothers, Jered B. Kolbert, and Joseph Miravalle, Duquesne University

Abstract

The social information processing (SIP) model, which involves a sequence of six cognitive processing steps, is frequently used by researchers to understand proactive and reactive aggression in youth; however, there has been little discussion in the literature regarding the application of the SIP model in school counseling. This article presents a review of the SIP model followed by a brief summary of the research regarding the relationship between SIP deficits and aggression. Counseling interventions related to each of the SIP steps for use with proactive and reactive aggressive youth are also presented.

Citation

Santone, E., Crothers, L. M., Kolbert, J. B., & Miravalle, J. (2020).  Using social information processing theory to counsel aggressive youth. Journal of School Counseling, 18(18). http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v18n18.pdf 

Type of Article

Current Issues


Volume 18, Number 19: 

Are School Counselors Sufficiently Prepared to Serve Students with Disabilities?

Jenna M. Alvarez, University of Cincinnati, Christine Suniti Bhat, Ohio University, and Leena J. Landmark, Sam Houston State University

Abstract

The purpose of this qualitative exploratory single-case study was to examine how school counselors from a master’s level counselor education program are trained to work with PreK-12 students with disabilities. Transcripts from semi-structured interviews with nine school counselors-in-training and course syllabi were analyzed using embedded analysis and pattern matching analysis techniques. A key finding was that school counselor trainees drew on prior knowledge and experiences rather than education to work with PreK-12 students with disabilities. Recommendations for school counselor training focused on better serving PreK-12 students with disabilities are provided.

Citation

Alvarez, J. M., Bhat, C. S., & Landmark, L. J. (2020).  Are school counselors sufficiently prepared to serve students with disabilities? Journal of School Counseling, 18(19). http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/
articles/v18n19.pdf 

Type of Article

Theory and Research


Volume 18, Number 20: 

Sexual and Gender Minority Identity Development: Recommendations for School Counselors

Jack D. Simons, Mercy College, and Matthew J. Beck, Western Illinois University – Quad Cities

Abstract

School counselors should be taught about and utilize sexual and gender minority (SGM) identity development models as part of training and advocacy for and with SGM youth in schools. This article reviews several widely used SGM identity development models and provides pedagogical and clinical practice recommendations. Current and future school counselors, including those who train them, are responsible for promoting authentic and healthy human development by reviewing SGM identity development models with students and other school stakeholders.

Citation

Simons, J. D., & Beck, M. J. (2020).  Sexual and gender minority identity development: Recommendations for school counselors. Journal of School Counseling, 18(20). http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v18n20.pdf 

Type of Article

Current Issues 


Volume 18, Number 21: 

School Counselors as Social Justice Change Agents: Addressing Retention of African American Males

Mariama I. Cook Sandifer, Columbus State University, and Eva M. Gibson, Austin Peay State University

Abstract

African American students are retained at a higher rate compared to Hispanic and White students (National Center of Education Statistics, 2015). While there are many causative variables identified as explanations for racial disparities in grade retention practices, school counselors are encouraged to facilitate efforts to bridge existing gaps. This article outlines educational challenges for African American males and explores the connection between race and culture in grade retention practices in schools. The school counselors’ role is discussed and implications for practitioners are provided.

Citation

Sandifer, M. I., & Gibson, E. M. (2020).  School counselors as social justice change agents: Addressing retention of African American males. Journal of School Counseling, 18(21).  http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v18n21.pdf 

Type of Article

Current Issues 


Volume 18, Number 22: 

School-Age Coping: Themes Across Three Generations of Sexual Minorities

Jack D. Simons and Melissa Ramdas, Mercy College, and Stephen T. Russell, University of Texas-Austin

Abstract

Because sexual minorities are an at-risk population, researchers conducted retrospective life story interviews with 191 sexual minority people comprising participants from a marriage equality cohort, an HIV/AIDS epidemic cohort, and a Stonewall rebellion cohort. The participants were located within 80 miles of four major metropolitan areas in the United States. Of the 191 participants interviewed, 90 participants talked about their school-age experiences and how they coped during elementary, middle, and high school. Five themes were identified in the interview data that were coded by the research team: (a) the influence of relationships, (b) experiencing emotions, (c) coming out, (d) coping behaviorally, and (e) coping cognitively. Implications for school counseling practice and future research are provided for educators, researchers, and helping professionals.

Citation

Simons, J. D., Ramdas, M., & Russell, S. T. (2020).  School-age coping: Themes across three generations of sexual minorities. Journal of School Counseling, 18(22). http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/
articles/v18n22.pdf 

Type of Article

Theory and Research 


Volume 18, Number 23: 

High School Hazing Prevention and Gender: Implications for School Counselors

Elizabeth J. Allan, Leah Hakkola, and David Kerschner, University of Maine

Abstract

This article describes an evaluation of a high school hazing prevention training workshop with an investigation of gender differences in student responses. Data were gathered using pre- and post-surveys and follow-up focus groups with athletic teams in two schools in the northeastern U.S. Statistical analyses reveal the training was effective in shifting responses for male and female students while the staff impact was limited. Gendered perceptions and themes of power and status emerged from the qualitative analysis. Recommendations for research and school counselor practice are provided.

Citation

Allan, E. J., Hakkola, L., & Kerschner, D. (2020). High school hazing prevention and gender: Implications for school counselors. Journal of School Counseling, 18(23). http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/
articles/v18n23.pdf 

Type of Article

Theory and Research  


Volume 18, Number 24: 

A Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the School Counseling Program Implementation Survey

Heather J. Fye, The University of Alabama, and Riza Memis, Ilker Soyturk, Rebecca Myer, Aryn C. Karpinski, and J. Steve Rainey, Kent State University

Abstract

The three-factor model structure of the School Counseling Program Implementation Survey was tested with a national sample (N = 275) of school counselors. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) suggested a modified two-factor model was the most appropriate fit. Implications and future research for the school counseling profession are discussed.

Citation

Fye, H. J., Memis, R., Soyturk, I., Myer, R., Karpinski, A. C., & Rainey, J. S. (2020). A confirmatory factor analysis of the School Counseling Program Implementation Survey. Journal of School Counseling, 18(24). http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v18n24.pdf 

Type of Article

Theory and Research


Volume 18, Number 25: 

Understanding Elementary and Middle School Counselors’ Experiences with Disability Awareness and Advocacy

Christa S. Bialka and Stacey Havlik, Villanova University

Abstract

Students with disabilities are at greater risk for depression, substance use, bullying, and fewer friendships, largely due to negative attitudes and misperceptions from their nondisabled peers. School counselors are particularly important stakeholders in improving the experiences of students with disabilities. This qualitative study uses the American Counseling Association (ACA) Advocacy Competencies as a lens to understand how six school counselors raise disability awareness within the context of social justice advocacy. Results indicate that participants primarily focused on ways to advocate alongside or on behalf of students with disabilities at an individual level (client/student domain). Additional findings highlight the need for increased disability-related training within counselor preparation programs and the importance of including disability issues within the frame of multicultural competence. The results of this study fill a gap in the literature and lead to a deeper understanding of how school counselors are presently engaging in disability programs in their schools. Additionally, findings from this research directly aid in the construction of coursework and related experiences that would enhance the preparation of pre-service school counselors.disabilities. This qualitative study uses the American Counseling Association (ACA) Advocacy Competencies as a lens to understand how six school counselors raise disability awareness within the context of social justice advocacy. Results indicate that participants primarily focused on ways advocate alongside or on behalf of students with disabilities at an individual level (client/student domain). Additional findings highlight the need for increased disability-related training within counselor preparation programs and the importance of including disability within the frame of multicultural competence. The results of this study fill a gap in the literature and lead to a deeper understanding of how school counselors are presently engaging in disability programming in their schools. Additionally, findings from this research directly aid in the construction of coursework and related experiences that would enhance the preparation of pre-service school counselors.

Citation

Bialka, C. S., & Havlik, S. (2020). Understanding elementary and middle school counselors’ experiences with disability awareness and advocacy. Journal of School Counseling, 18(25). http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v18n25.pdf 

Type of Article

Theory and Research


Volume 18, Number 26: 

Evidence-Based Social Skills Curricula for Adolescents With Autism and Developmental Disabilities: A Literature Review

Malti Tuttle, Doris Hill, and Caroline Rothschild, Auburn University

Abstract

A literature review of evidence-based social skills curricula that support adolescents with autism and developmental disabilities (ASD/DD) is presented. This article provides an overview of peer-reviewed articles and evaluation of the feasibility of implementing evidence-based interventions for social skills within the academic setting for adolescents in need of such interventions. The intent of this article is inform school counselors of these resources and curricula.social skills within the academic setting for adolescents in need of such interventions. The intent of this article is inform school counselors of these resources and curricula.

Citation

Tuttle, M., Hill, D., & Rothschild, C. (2020). Evidence-based social skills curricula for adolescents with autism and developmental disabilities: A literature review. Journal of School Counseling, 18(26). http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v18n26.pdf 

Type of Article

Theory and Research


Volume 18, Number 27: 

Experiences of Adolescents as They Navigate the Competitive College-Going Culture

Kathleen L. Grant, Monmouth University

Abstract

A growing body of literature has demonstrated that the college preparation and admissions process is a powerful force in the lives of some high school students. However, mounting evidence illuminates unintended consequences of the college admission pressures on students. This study endeavored to gain an understanding of the lived experiences of adolescents as they navigate the competitive and achievement-oriented college-going culture. The participants’ narratives described the ways these students accepted, struggled with, challenged, and resisted dominant cultural messages as they prepared for college. The insights gained from the participants’ portraits have implications for school counseling practice and future research.

Citation

Grant, K. L. (2020). Experiences of adolescents as they navigate the competitive college-going culture. Journal of School Counseling, 18(27). http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v18n27.pdf 

Type of Article

Theory and Research


Volume 18, Number 28: 

Addressing the Unrecognized Grief of Elementary Students Experiencing Relationship Loss

Jake J. Protivnak, Youngstown State University, Holly Scott, Capella University, Emily R. Herman, The Ohio State University, and Danielle Matos, Western Reserve Local School District

Abstract

Unrecognized grief (also called disenfranchised grief) is an emotion experienced when a loss is not socially supported, mourned, or acknowledged (Doka, 1989). Elementary students often experience unrecognized grief when relationships with friends, family, teachers, support professionals, and pets change or end. While these developments are often a normal part of life, elementary students experience grief that may lead to academic or behavioral difficulties in school. The purpose of this article is to review the concept of unrecognized grief experienced by elementary students due to relationship loss and provide school counselors with individual, group, and system-wide strategies.

Citation

Protivnak, J. J., Scott, H., Herman, E. R., & Matos, D. (2020). Addressing the unrecognized grief of elementary students experiencing relationship loss. Journal of School Counseling, 18(28). http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v18n28.pdf 

Type of Article

Current Issues


2021

Volume 19, Number 1: 

After the Fires: School Counselors Respond

Maureen Buckley, Sonoma State University, and Alina Robello, University of California Riverside

Abstract

This article explores school counselors’ experiences of the 2017 Sonoma Complex wildfires. Thirty-eight school counselors completed a 20-item survey exploring impact and responses to the devastating wildfires. Results detail school counselors’ insights regarding post-fire responses and the impact of the fires on students, families, and school staff. Findings include the importance of open and collaborative communication, counseling support, and contextual interventions that address both instrumental and psychological needs. Implications for practice and future research are presented. 

Citation

Buckley, M. & Robello, A. (2021). After the fires: School counselors respond. Journal of School Counseling, 19(1).  http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v19n1.pdf 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

Volume 19, Number 2: 

School Refusal in a Multi-Tiered System of Supports Model: Cognitive-Behavioral and Mindfulness Interventions

Lindsey M. Nichols, University of Wyoming, Sally Mueller, Missoula, Montana, and Kelley Donisthorpe, University of Montana

Abstract

School attendance is a complex topic for all school stakeholders preparing students for college and career success. Students who refuse to attend or avoid school are affected or influenced by a myriad of reasons such as their own physical or mental health issues. This article explores the various factors at the root of school refusal, particularly anxiety. Considering students’ possible sources of distress, cognitive-behavioral and mindfulness interventions are discussed as well as other strategies across a multi-tiered system of supports model. Three case studies provide insight into various interventions that school counselors and other school personnel may use in school refusal situations. 

Citation

Nichols, L. M., Mueller, S., & Donisthorpe, K. (2021). School refusal in a multi-tiered system of supports model: Cognitive-behavioral and mindfulness interventionsJournal of School Counseling, 19(2). http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v19n2.pdf 

Type of Article

Current Issues

Volume 19, Number 3: 

Resilience Factors in College Students at Risk of Depression

Diane Marcotte, Université du Québec à Montréal, and Aude Villatte, Université du Québec en Outaouais

Abstract

The college transition constitutes a vulnerability period for at-risk students. Although several risk factors associated with depression have been identified in the young adult population, very few studies to date have focused on the aspect of resilience during this academic transition. In the present study, a subgroup of resilient students, who did not report depressive symptoms despite experiencing some family risk factors, was compared to a subgroup of depressive students. The results revealed that, among these variables, a low level of dysfunctional attitudes related to dependency and well-defined personal goals can be considered as being higher resiliency variables. 

Citation

Marcotte, D., & Villatte, A. (2021). Resilience factors in college students at risk of depression. Journal of School Counseling, 19(3). http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v19n3.pdf 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

Volume 19, Number 4: 

School Counselors’ Role in Child Rights and Human Rights Education: Moving Beyond One’s Professional Comfort Zone

Juneau Mahan Gary, Kean University

Abstract

Average American students are seldom aware of child and human rights principles and their impact globally and locally. School counselors are one logical group of school specialists skilled to facilitate school-based, rights-based (i.e., child and human rights) initiatives to promote students’ awareness. Moving beyond their professional comfort zones, school counselors have (a) training in leadership, systemic change, advocacy, and collaboration and (b) requisite skills to facilitate students’ development of a rights-based foundation to become engaged and responsible global citizens with a mature rights-based lens. Rights-based resources are offered for guidance lessons, academic lessons, and extra-curricular programs. 

Citation

Gary, J. M. (2021). School counselors’ role in child rights and human rights education: Moving beyond one’s professional comfort zone. Journal of School Counseling, 19(4). http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/
articles/v19n4.pdf 

Type of Article

Current Issues

Volume 19, Number 5: 

School Counselors and School-Community Partnerships: Perceptions From School Counselors

Sabri Dogan, Siirt University, and Colette T. Dollarhide and David Julian, The Ohio State University

Abstract

Numerous authors have called for school counselors to be leaders in school-community collaborative partnerships, yet current research pertaining to school counselors’ involvement with such efforts is lacking. This survey was conducted to ascertain school counselors’ perceptions of their role and training relative to school-community partnerships in a Midwestern state. 

Citation

Dogan, S., Dollarhide, C. T., & Julian, D. (2021). School counselors and school-community partnerships: Perceptions from school counselors. Journal of School Counseling, 19(5). http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/
articles/v19n5.pdf 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

Volume

19, Number 6: 

Supporting the Success of Student Refugees Using a Multi-Tiered Systemic Approach

Dana T. Isawi, Northern Illinois University, Olamojiba Bamgbose, University of Wisconsin Whitewater, and Teresa. A. Fisher, Northern Illinois University

Abstract

School counselors are in a unique position to support the development and success of student refugees. This article presents a multi-tiered systemic approach for school counselors to enhance the social/emotional, academic, and career development of student refugees in K-12 schools. The article elaborates on culturally sensitive practical interventions for working with this population of students. 

Citation

Isawi, D. T., Bamgbose, O., & Fisher, T. A. (2021). Supporting the success of student refugees using a multi-tiered systemic approach. Journal of School Counseling, 19(6). http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/
articles/v19n6.pdf 

Type of Article

Resource Brief

Volume 19, Number 7: 

Forward March: Implementing the ASCA National Model to Support Military-Connected Students

Taqueena S. Quintana, Arkansas State University, and Rebekah F. Cole, Arkansas State University

Abstract

This article outlines the challenges that military-connected students face and discusses ways in which school counselors may utilize each of the four components of the ASCA National Model to help this population. Finally, a case study is presented to demonstrate how school counselors may support military-connected students. Utilizing the ASCA model is especially important when working with military-connected students, who may have needs that are unfamiliar to many school counselors. 

Citation

Quintana, T. S., & Cole, R. F. (2021). Forward march: Implementing the ASCA National Model to support military-connected students. Journal of School Counseling, 19(7). http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/
articles/v19n7.pdf 

Type of Article

Current Issues

 

Volume 19, Number 8: 

Experiences of Successful First-Generation College Students With College Access

Jonathan R. Ricks, The University of North Carolina at Pembroke, and Jeffrey M. Warren, North Carolina Central University

Abstract

A plethora of educational research suggests that first-generation college students (FGCS) are at a distinct disadvantage when attempting to access college. Much of the research on this population examines the struggles these students face. Using a phenomenological approach, this qualitative study investigated lived experiences of ten successful FGCS enrolled at an historically Black university in southeastern United States. Themes emerged related to the participants’ pre-college circumstances, decision to attend college, and experiences accessing college. The results of the study serve as a guide for professional school counselors who aim to develop preventative measures and promote social and cultural capital for prospective FGCS.. 

Citation

Ricks, J. R., & Warren, J. M. (2021). Experiences of successful first-generation college students with college access. Journal of School Counseling, 19(8). http:/www.jsc.montana.edu/
articles/v19n8.pdf 

Type of Article

Theory and Research