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The articles published in JSC are indexed in ERIC (Education Resources Information Center).

This page lists all articles published from 2016 through 2017.

 
 

2016

Volume 14, Number 1:

 

Supporting Every Child: School Counselors’ Perceptions of Juvenile Sex Offenders in Schools

Leann Wyrick Morgan and Levi S. McClendon, University of Texas at Tyler, Jenna McCarty, University of Colorado – Colorado Springs, and Kirk Zinck, University of Texas at Tyler

 

Abstract

Researchers explored the attitudes and concerns of professional school counselors in their roles in working with juvenile sex offenders (JSOs) who attend school. Little empirical data exist regarding school counselors’ roles in effectively engaging and supporting JSOs toward school success. Focus groups contributed to the consensual qualitative research (CQR) methodology, providing a framework for investigating concerns, experiences, attitudes, and beliefs related to juvenile sex offenders and school climate. The authors present findings of five systematic themes and the implications for school counselor best practice.

 

Citation

Morgan, L. W., McClendon, L. S., McCarty, J., & Zinck, K. (2016). Supporting every child: School counselors’ perceptions of juvenile sex offenders in schools. Journal of School Counseling, 14(1). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v14n1.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 14, Number 2:

 

Eating Issues and Body Image in Elementary School: Detection and Prevention Strategies for School Counselors

Sarah I. Springer, Temple University, and Dana Heller Levitt, Montclair State University

 

Abstract

Body image disturbance continues to be recognized in increasingly younger populations. Eating issues among elementary school children have become more overt and statistically prevalent in recent years. Elementary school counselors are in important positions to provide their communities with early detection information and prevention strategies. This manuscript will identify potential causes and risks associated with body image disturbance in elementary school-age children and present strategies for school counselors that address detection, prevention, and intervention efforts.

 

Citation

Springer, S. I. & Levitt, D. H. (2016). Eating issues and body image in elementary school: Detection and prevention strategies for school counselors. Journal of School Counseling, 14(2). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v14n2.pdf

 

Type of Article

Innovative Methods

 

Volume 14, Number 3:

 

Professional Capacity Building for School Counselors Through School-wide Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports (SWPBIS) Implementation

Jennifer Betters-Bubon, University of Wisconsin-Whitewater, and Peg Donohue, Central Connecticut State University

 

Abstract

The implementation of school-wide positive behavioral interventions and supports (SWPBIS) has been shown to reduce behavioral incidents and lead to more positive school climates. Despite the growing popularity in schools, there lacks clear understanding of the school counselor role in this approach. We present the perspectives of an elementary school counselor and middle school counselor engaged in starting SWPBIS programs. This position paper is focused on how the alignment of school counseling and SWPBIS programs can lead to increased school counselor leadership capacity, resulting in collaborative teaming, the use of data and systemic school change.

 

Citation

Betters-Bubon, J., & Donohue, P. (2016). Professional capacity building for school counselors through school-wide positive behavior interventions and supports implementation. Journal of School Counseling, 14(3). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v14n3.pdf

 

Type of Article

Current Issues

 

Volume 14, Number 4:

 

Predictors of Parent Involvement and their Impact on Access of Postsecondary Education Facilitators among White and American Indian Parents

Gerta Bardhoshi, University of Iowa, Kelly Duncan, Northern State University, and Amy Schweinle, University of South Dakota

 

Abstract

This study examined demographic factors as predictors of parent involvement (engagement with school, support of learning, support of child) among parents of children that attended a school implementing a college access program. The authors also examined whether involvement predicted access of postsecondary education facilitators in parents, when accounting for demographic factors. Results from multiple regression analyses indicated that parent race/ethnicity and income predicted involvement, while education level predicted access of postsecondary education facilitators. However, when including demographic factors, parent involvement was not predictive of access of postsecondary education facilitators.

 

Citation

Bardhoshi, G., Duncan, K., & Schweinle, A. (2016). Predictors of parent involvement and their impact on access of postsecondary education facilitators among White and American Indian parents. Journal of School Counseling, 14(4). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v14n4.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 14, Number 5:

 

An Exploratory Study of the Child Disciplinary Practices of Jamaican Immigrant Parents in the United States: Implications for School Counselors

Stephaney S. Morrison, City University of New York - Hunter College, Delores E. Smith, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Julia A. Bryan, Pennsylvania State University, and Janeé M. Steele, Western Michigan University

 

Abstract

Jamaican immigrant students are highly represented in U.S. public schools, primarily in regions concentrated throughout the east coast. Many of these students and their families have personal and social concerns that have implications for school counselors. In particular, scholars suggest that among this population, harsh methods of child discipline (e.g., corporal punishment) are prevalent and have ramifications for academic achievement, child abuse reporting, and socialization within the school. Few studies, however, document the disciplinary techniques of Jamaican immigrants in the United States. This exploratory study was developed to fill this gap in the literature. Results challenge prevailing assumptions about the universality of corporal punishment among Jamaican immigrants. Participants in the current study reported using a variety of disciplinary techniques and corporal punishment was not among the most used. Implications for school counselors and future research are discussed.

 

Citation

Morrison, S. S., Smith, D. E., Bryan, J. A., & Steele, J. M. (2016). An exploratory study of the child disciplinary practices of Jamaican immigrant parents in the United States: Implications for school counselors. Journal of School Counseling, 14(5). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v14n5.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 14, Number 6:

 

Mandala Mornings: A Creative Approach for Elementary School Counselors

Katrina Cook and Mary G. Mayorga, Texas A&M University-San Antonio, and Veronica Ball, Archdiocese of San Antonio, Department of Catholic Schools

 

Abstract

The American School Counselor Association (ASCA, 2012) has identified one of the ways elementary school counselors can assist students to become successful in school is to offer small group counseling through the responsive services delivery system. Expressive arts, such as creating mandalas, provide a non-threatening approach for school counselors to support the students they serve. This article describes how elementary school counselors in a large school district incorporated mandalas in the delivery of their responsive services. An example of an early morning group using mandalas is described.

 

Citation

Cook, K., Mayorga, M. G, & Ball, V. (2016). Mandala mornings: A creative approach for elementary school counselors. Journal of School Counseling, 14(6). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v14n6.pdf

 

Type of Article

Innovative Methods

 

Volume 14, Number 7:

 

Understanding Support From School Counselors as Predictors of Mexican American Adolescents’ College-Going Beliefs

Javier Cavazos Vela, University of Texas Rio Grande Valley, Brande Flamez, Lamar University, and Gregory Scott Sparrow and Eunice Lerma, University of Texas Rio Grande Valley

 

Abstract

The impact of high school counselors’ support on Mexican American adolescents’ college-going beliefs was examined. We used a quantitative, predictive design to explore predictors of Mexican American adolescents’ college-going beliefs. Perceptions of accessibility and expectations from school counselors positively impacted college-going beliefs while perceptions of appraisal negatively impacted college-going beliefs. In addition to a discussion regarding the importance of these findings, implications for school counselors and researchers are offered.

 

Citation

Vela, J. C., Flamez, B., Sparrow, G. S., & Lerma, E. (2016). Understanding support from school counselors as predictors of Mexican American adolescents’ college-going beliefs. Journal of School Counseling, 14(7). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v14n7.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 14, Number 8:

 

The Qualitative Impact of Adventure Based Counseling on Sixth Grade General Education Students

Richard L Albright, Lee University

 

Abstract

General education, middle school students’ experience and outcomes related to their participation in adventure based counseling (ABC) were investigated through the use of qualitative research case study design. Research questions examine what students expect, experience, and perceive as the impact of an adventure based intervention. Analysis of interviews, researcher observations, field notes, and journaling provide key insights into ABC programming. Students’ expectations were such that they expected to have fun, but were fearful, yet confident. An examination of their immediate reactions to the intervention revealed that the students experienced physical challenge and success, social challenge and success, emotional challenge and success, as well as cognitive challenge and success. A key finding from an interview session with students completed well after the activities took place revealed that students believed that the intervention had a positive impact socially for themselves as well as their classmates. These insights into ABC provide facilitators, school counselors, teachers, and administrators valuable information on the constructs through which participant growth occurs and recommendations for planning and facilitating such programming.

 

Citation

Albright, R. L. (2016). The qualitative impact of adventure based counseling on sixth grade general education students. Journal of School Counseling, 14(8). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v14n8.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

Volume 14, Number 9:

 

Collaborative Relationships Between Principals and School Counselors: Facilitating a Model for Developing a Working Alliance

Melissa A. Odegard-Koester and Paul Watkins, Southeast Missouri State University

 

Abstract

The working relationship between principals and school counselors have received some attention in the literature, however, little empirical research exists that examines specifically the components that facilitate a collaborative working relationship between the principal and school counselor. This qualitative case study examined the unique perspective for building a leader-member relationship between the principal and school counselor. Specifically, the case study examined the experiences of the working relationship of a principal and school counselor in a rural Midwestern elementary school. Data analysis revealed that the following three shared themes emerged: student-centered focus, role differentiation, and trust. From these themes and their descriptions a collaborative working relationship resulted. As a result, the principal school counselor model evolved. Implications for principals and school counselors as well as future research are presented.

 

Citation

Odegard-Koester, M. A., & Watkins, P. (2016). Collaborative relationships between principals and school counselors: Facilitating a model for developing a working alliance. Journal of School Counseling, 14(9). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v14n9.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

Volume 14, Number 10:

 

Person-Centered Counseling and Solution-Focused Brief Therapy: An Integrative Model for School Counselors

Merry Leigh Dameron, University of North Carolina at Charlotte

 

Abstract

Increasing demands upon the time of the professional school counselor combined with the call by the American School Counselor Association to provide direct services to students may lead many in the profession to wonder from what theoretical standpoint(s) they can best meet these lofty goals. I propose a two phase approach combining person-centered counseling with solution-focused brief therapy as a concrete, functional method to address student counseling needs within the school setting.

 

Citation

Dameron, M. L. (2016). Person-centered counseling and solution-focused brief therapy: An integrative model for school counselors. Journal of School Counseling, 14(10). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v14n10.pdf

 

Type of Article

Innovative Methods

Volume 14, Number 11:

 

Family Matters: An Investigation of Family Coursework in School Counseling Programs

J. Richelle Joe, University of Central Florida, and Pamela N. Harris, University of North Carolina at Greensboro

 

Abstract

School counselors are expected to form collaborative relationships with the families of students. Yet, school counselors have limited knowledge about families to form these partnerships, as a descriptive content analysis of the family coursework requirements in CACREP-accredited school counseling programs in the southern region revealed that most programs do not mandate family coursework. Implications for the preparation of students to engage in school-family collaboration are discussed.

 

Citation

Joe, J. R., & Harris, P. N. (2016). Family matters: An investigation of family coursework in school counseling programs. Journal of School Counseling, 14(11). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v14n11.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

Volume 14, Number 12:

 

Evidence-Informed Recommendations to Promote Black Student Engagement

Shyrea J. Minton, California State University, Northridge

 

Abstract

In 2012, Black students dropped out of school at a rate of 7.5% (NCES, 2013a). While this is the second lowest dropout rate for this population in 55 years, Black students are still dropping out at nearly twice the rate (4.3%) of their White counterparts. This paper includes a review of literature related to this phenomenon and offers evidence-informed recommendations taken from the literature for professional school counselors to utilize to improve academic engagement of Black students. These recommendations include: facilitating difficult dialogues on race, using a Student Success Skills program, and entering into school-family-community partnerships.

 

Citation

Minton, S. J. (2016). Evidence-informed recommendations to promote Black student engagement. Journal of School Counseling, 14(12). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v14n12.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

Volume 14, Number 13:

 

Boys II Men: A Culturally-Responsive School Counseling Group for Urban High School Boys of Color

Leyla Pérez-Gualdrón, Christine Yeh, and LyRyan Russell, University of San Francisco

 

Abstract

Using a participatory and collaborative approach, we developed, implemented, and evaluated a culturally responsive school counseling group, Boys II Men, for 11 low-income diverse male students of color at an urban public school. The content of the group focused on five areas: social connections and support, exploring gender roles, navigating identities, school engagement, and future planning. We worked closely with teachers, school staff, and counselors to foster a supportive and positive school climate (Beesley, 2004). Each student was interviewed about his experience in the group to assess the impact of the strategies and techniques used. We also analyzed the specific content of each module for main themes. Strengths and weaknesses of the group were also assessed at post-test. Innovative methods and practical applications for school counselors are discussed.

 

Citation

Pérez-Gualdrón, L., Yeh, C., & Russell, L. (2016). Boys II Men: A culturally-responsive school counseling group for urban high school boys of color. Journal of School Counseling, 14(13). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v14n13.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

Volume 14, Number 14:

 

Working With Nonsuicidal Self-Injurious Adolescents

Mark D. Nelson, Montana State University, and Rian Piccin, Lander, Wyoming

 

Abstract

Nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) has evolved into a serious issue for adolescents, and is encountered in school systems across the United States. The ability of school counselors and other professionals working in the school environment to understand and assist students who exhibit signs of NSSI is critically important. Research remains minimal on the subject and it is unclear whether or not schools across the country have proper protocols in place for working with students who exhibit signs of NSSI. School professionals should be familiar with NSSI, how to identify NSSI behaviors in students, and proper protocols for working with students who exhibit signs of NSSI.

 

Citation

Nelson, M. D., & Piccin, R. (2016). Working with nonsuicidal self-injurious adolescents. Journal of School Counseling, 14(12). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v14n14.pdf

 

Type of Article

Current Issues

 
 

2017

 

Special Edition: Volume 15, Nos. 1-6

Enriching Student Well-Being and Success

Volume 15, Number 1:

Creating School Climates That Foster Inclusive Community Attitudes Toward Gender Nonconforming Students

Layla J. Kurt, University of Dayton

 

Abstract

Transgender students are a marginalized group of students who are calling for recognition and acceptance of their identities. Although Title IX assures students of freedom from discrimination based on sexual identity, many schools are struggling with policies that adequately provide these protections. Based on a previous qualitative study conducted by the author, this manuscript provides strategies that school counselors and other educators can implement to create a school climate that is safe, equitable, and fosters the well-being and success of transgender students.

 

Citation

Kurt, L. J. (2017). Creating school climates that foster inclusive community attitudes toward gender nonconforming students. Journal of School Counseling, 15(1). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v15n1.pdf

 

Type of Article

Current Issues

 

Volume 15, Number 2:

 

Transition to Post-secondary Life for Students with Disabilities: Promoting Student Success

Theresa A. Quigney, Cleveland State University

 

Abstract

The transition to life after high school for students with disabilities and the vital role that school counselors have in assisting the students and their families to achieve success are discussed. As there may be unique requirements for these students in making this transition, it is important that school counselors are acquainted with particular matters and techniques critical to student success. The educational categories of disabilities and special considerations that are presented may be beneficial to school counselors as they enhance their students’ opportunities to achieve their goals.

 

Citation

Quigney, T. A. (2017). Transition to post-secondary life for students with disabilities: Promoting student success. Journal of School Counseling, 15(2). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v15n2.pdf

 

Type of Article

Current Issues

 

Volume 15, Number 3:

 

Promoting Low-income Students’ College Readiness, Well-being, and Success: A GEAR UP Counseling Program Study

Lorri M. Capizzi, San Jose State University, Carolyn Huie Hofstetter, University of California, San Diego, and Dolores D. Mena, Brent Duckor, and Xiaolu Hu, San Jose State University

 

Abstract

This article documents narrative experiences from alumni who participated in the GEAR UP program. The San Jose State University GEAR UP program, based on an intensive counseling model, is grounded in social capital and resilience theories, and is designed to increase the number of low-income students who are prepared to enter and succeed in postsecondary education. Qualitative findings from surveys and semi-structured interviews with GEAR UP alumni highlight the power of this intensive counseling model in providing meaning, connectedness, and a sense of empowerment for students to support their personal and academic development, college readiness, and overall well-being.

 

Citation

Capizzi, L. M., Hofstetter, C. H., Mena. D. D., Duckor, B., & Hu, X. (2017). Promoting low-income students’ college readiness, well-being, and success: A GEAR UP counseling program study. Journal of School Counseling, 15(3). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v15n3.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 15, Number 4:

 

School Counselors’ Role in Dropout Prevention and Credit Recovery

Donna Tromski-Klingshirn and Yoko Miura, Wright State University

 

Abstract

This article introduces credit recovery (CR) programs to school counseling. Traditionally the school counselors’ role in CR has been limited to referring students who are, or who have, failed courses. Based on own our findings from a study of a large Midwest high school (N = 2,000) CR program, we make specific recommendations for school counselors to advocate for, and intervene with, failing students. Further, we propose a new instructional leadership role for school counselors within the instructional leadership team (ILT) to lead credit recovery efforts within the schools.

 

Citation

Tromski-Klingshirn, D. & Miura, Y. (2017). School counselors’ role in dropout prevention and credit recovery. Journal of School Counseling, 15(4). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v15n4.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 15, Number 5:

 

Mental Health and Social Emotional Programming in Schools: Missing Link or Misappropriation?

Trigg A. Even, University of North Texas Dallas, and Heather L. Quast, Texas A&M University Commerce

 

Abstract

While differences of opinion exist on whether mental health services fall within the scope of public education, schools may represent the best opportunity to provide young people with necessary access to mental health care. Professional school counselors are uniquely qualified by training and experience to address the mental health and social emotional development needs of students, yet may be underutilized for this purpose, in part because school counselors may not be speaking the language of education, that is, academic achievement. The authors questioned whether school counseling is the missing link to advancing academic achievement or a misappropriation that deters schools from accomplishing their core mission. The literature relevant to the relationship between mental health programming and academic achievement was reviewed and recommended talking points for professional advocacy are discussed.

 

Citation

Even, T. A., & Quast, H. L. (2017). Mental health and social emotional programming in schools: Missing link or misappropriation? Journal of School Counseling, 15(5). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v15n5.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 15, Number 6:

 

School Counselors and Multicultural Education: Applying the Five Dimensions

Clare Merlin, University of North Carolina, Charlotte

 

Abstract

Multicultural education is an educational approach designed to ensure equal educational opportunities for all students, including those in marginalized groups. This approach has historically been directed towards teachers, but school counselors have the appropriate training and skills to lead multicultural education efforts, as well. In this article, the five dimensions of multicultural education are described and examples are provided that suggest how school counselors can use each dimension in order to create a context in which all students succeed.

 

Citation

Merlin, C. (2017). School counselors and multicultural education: Applying the five dimensions. Journal of School Counseling, 15(6). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v15n6.pdf

 

Type of Article

Current Issues

 

Volume 15, Number 7:

 

Motivational Interviewing, the Transtheoretical Model of Change, and Academic Development

Jered B. Kolbert, Brittany L. Happe, Debra Hyatt-Burkhart, and Laura M. Crothers, Duquesne University, and Marissa Capuzzi, Greater Latrobe School District

 

Abstract

Motivational interviewing (Miller & Rollnick, 2012) and the transtheoretical model of change (Prochaska, Norcross, & DiClimente, 2007) offer potential considerable benefits to professional school counselors’ efforts to promote academic development. We describe how these models can be used by professional school counselors in the provision of what are referred to as responsive services in the ASCA National Model (ASCA, 2012), which includes individual counseling, individual student planning, and the indirect services of collaboration and consultation with parents and teachers as they strive to support student academic achievement. We offer two case studies to illustrate the adaptation and employment of the approaches discussed in the paper.

 

Citation

Kolbert, J. B., Happe, B. L., Hyatt-Burkhart, D., Crothers, L. M., & Capuzzi, M. (2017). Motivational interviewing, the transtheoretical model of change, and academic development. Journal of School Counseling, 15(7). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v15n7.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 15, Number 8:

 

Myths and Misconceptions About LGBTQ Youth: School Counselors’ Role in Advocacy

Roberto L. Abreu, University of Kentucky, and Adriana G. McEachern and Maureen C. Kenny, Florida International University

 

Abstract

Although schools are thought to be safe environments for all students, sexual minority and gender expansive (i.e., LGBTQ) students often feel unsafe and unwelcome as a result of misconceptions about their identity. This paper explores eight commonly held myths and misconceptions about LGBTQ youth. The role of professional school counselors (PSCs) in debunking these myths and advocating for these students will be discussed. Implications for practice and future research will be addressed.

 

Citation

Abreu, R., McEachern, A. G., & Kenny, M. C. (2017). Myths and misconceptions about LGBTQ youth: school counselors’ role in advocacy. Journal of School Counseling, 15(8). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v15n8.pdf

 

Type of Article

Current Issues

 

Volume 15, Number 9:

 

A Randomized Controlled Study Evaluating a Brief, Bystander Bullying Intervention with Junior High School Students

Aida Midgett, Diana Doumas, Rhiannon Trull, and April D. Johnston, Boise State University

 

Abstract

A randomized controlled study evaluated a brief, bystander bullying intervention for junior high school students. Students in both groups reported an increase in knowledge and confidence to act as defenders and to utilize strategies to intervene on behalf of victims of bullying. Findings suggest possible carry-over effects from the intervention group to control group. Students in the intervention group, however, reported a significantly greater ability to identify of bullying and a decrease in anxiety (p = .06) relative to the control group. There were no differences in reported depression between the two groups. Implications for school counselors are discussed.

 

Citation

Midgett, A., Doumas, D., Trull, R., & Johnston, A. D. (2017). A randomized controlled study evaluating a brief, bystander bullying intervention with junior high school students. Journal of School Counseling, 15(9). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v15n9.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 15, Number 10:

 

Black and Latino Fathers of Students with Autism: Culturally Responsive Support

Michael D. Hannon, Montclair State University, Kaprea F. Johnson, Old Dominion University, and Nicole A. Christian and LaChan V. Hannon, Montclair State University

 

Abstract

Perspectives from five Black and Latino fathers of students with autism are shared from this qualitative pilot study. The fathers were asked to describe the most helpful forms of support from school counselors. One-time, semi-structured interviews were conducted and interpreted with the thematic analysis method. Results suggest support from other parents, and specifically from other fathers, with shared experiences is most helpful. Recommendations for school counseling practice and research are shared.

 

Citation

Hannon, M. D., Johnson, K. F., Christian, N. A., & Hannon, L. V. (2017). Black and Latino fathers of students with autism: Culturally responsive support. Journal of School Counseling, 15(10). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v15n10.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 15, Number 11:

 

Professional Issues in School Counseling and Suicide Prevention

Laura L. Gallo, Boise State University

 

Abstract

Suicide is the second leading cause of death for adolescents and has become a public health concern in the United States. In addition, certain groups of students are more at risk for suicide than others. School counselors have an ethical obligation to protect their students and are in an ideal position to educate students and staff about the risks and warning signs of suicide. Ethical issues such as counselor competence, school responsibility, and community buy in are important considerations for educators. Lastly, implications for practicing school counselors in preventing suicide are provided.

 

Citation

Gallo, L. L. (2017). Professional issues in school counseling and suicide prevention. Journal of School Counseling, 15(11). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v15n11.pdf

 

Type of Article

Current Issues

 

Volume 15, Number 12:

 

School Counselor Evaluation Instrument Pilot Project: A School Counselor Association, Department of Education, and University Collaboration

Richard E. Cleveland, Georgia Southern University, and Julie Hartline, Cobb County School District

 

Abstract

This article describes initial efforts to pilot an evaluation instrument for school counselors. The pilot was a collaboration led by the state’s school counselor association involving a state department of education (DOE), local school districts, and university faculty members. The article begins with a brief overview of historical and contextual factors relevant to the creation of the instrument and the pilot project. A summary description of the instrument is then provided that lists individual items and supplementary information distributed with the protocol. Next, preliminary results are presented. Finally, the article concludes by discussing limitations of the study, implications for practitioners, and recommendations for further research.

 

Citation

Cleveland, R. E., & Hartline, J. (2017). School counselor evaluation instrument pilot project: A school counselor association, department of education, and university collaboration. Journal of School Counseling, 15(12). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v15n12.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 15, Number 13:

 

Using an Ethical Decision-Making Model to Address Ethical Dilemmas in School Counseling

Timothy Brown, Stephen A. Armstrong, Samuel Bore, and Chris Simpson, Texas A&M University-Commerce

 

Abstract

School counselors frequently face ethical dilemmas. These dilemmas often involve relationships with principals, parents, and other stakeholders. School counselors may confront complex ethical issues involving confidentiality, student safety, parental rights, and social media. The American School Counselor Association recommends following an ethical decision-making model when dealing with complex ethical issues. An explanatory case study is provided along with sample dilemmas to illustrate how an ethical decision-making model might be used within the school setting.

 

Citation

Brown, T., Armstrong, S. A., Bore, S. & Simpson, C. (2017). Using an ethical decision-making model to address ethical dilemmas in school counseling. Journal of School Counseling, 15(13). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v15n13.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 15, Number 14:

 

Curricular Abstinence: Examining Human Sexuality Training in School Counselor Preparation Program

Richard Joseph Behun, Marywood University, Julie A. Cerrito, The University of Scranton, David L. Delmonico, Duquesne University, and Estelle Campenni, Marywood University

 

Abstract

Professional school counselors (PSCs; N = 486) rated their level of perceived preparedness acquired in their school counselor preparation program with respect to knowledge, skills, and self-awareness of five human sexuality domains (behavior, health, morality, identity, violence) across grade level (elementary vs. secondary) and three human sexuality training groups (single course in human sexuality, human sexuality infused throughout curriculum, or no human sexuality training). Results indicated that while the majority of PSCs provided sexuality counseling to school students, many reported not receiving master’s level education or training in this area.

 

Citation

Behun, R. J., Cerrito, J. A., Delmonico, D. L., & Campenni, E. (2017). Curricular abstinence: Examining human sexuality training in school counselor preparation program. Journal of School Counseling, 15(14). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v15n14.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 15, Number 15:

 

Positive Psychology and Career Development

Michelle Aulthouse, Albert Gallatin Area School District, and Jered B. Kolbert, Matthew J. Bundick and Laura M. Crothers, Duquesne University

 

Abstract

The article details how school counselors can use principles of positive psychology to promote students' career development by facilitating students' pursuit of purpose and meaning. Specifically, the publication identifies how school counselors can actively employ with their students five constructs of positive psychology—namely strengths, positive emotions and flow, gratitude, perceiving and living a calling, and work/school hope—identified by Dik et al., (2014) as having empirical support for promoting career development. The authors of the manuscript provide approaches and techniques drawing on counseling theories including: cognitive therapy, solution-focused therapy, existential therapy, and positive psychotherapy, and offer actionable strategies for school counselors.

 

Citation

Aulthouse, M., Kolbert, J. B., Bundick, M. J.,& Crothers, L. M. (2017). Positive psychology and career development. Journal of School Counseling, 15(15). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v15n15.pdf

 

Type of Article

Innovative Methods

 

Volume 15, Number 16:

 

School Counseling Needs of Latino Students

Maggie M. Parker, Mississippi College, and Dee C. Ray, University of North Texas

 

Abstract

This article focuses on determining the school counseling activities perceived as important by a sample of Latino high school students. The researchers explored student perceptions through the administration of a survey instrument created for this project to better understand Latino students’ perceptions and satisfaction with school counselor activities. The instrument consisted of items aligned with domains described in the American School Counselor Association’s National Model and current literature on Latino adolescents’ experiences. According to the results, students indicated that they believed college and career activities to be important, however were not satisfied with how their school counselors provided those activities. The results, limitations, and suggestions for school counselors are provided.

 

Citation

Parker, M. M., & Ray, D. C. (2017). School counseling needs of Latino students. Journal of School Counseling, 15(16). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v15n16.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 15, Number 17:

 

Helping Secondary School Students Understand and Regulate Stress

Mark D. Nelson and Dawn S. Tarabochia, Montana State University

 

Abstract

A psychoeducational unit on stress is provided for school counselors or other educators working with secondary school-aged students. The unit can be utilized as part of a guidance curriculum. An overview of stress response during adolescent development is provided. A brief historical and contextual description of guidance curriculum and its role in comprehensive school counseling programs are offered.

 

Citation

Nelson, M. D., & Tarabochia, D. S. (2017). Helping secondary school students understand and regulate stress. Journal of School Counseling, 15(17). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v15n17.pdf

 

Type of Article

Innovative Methods

 

Volume 15, Number 18:

 

School Counselors Supporting the Career and College Preparedness of Students from Poverty: Using the CARE Model

Glenda S. Johnson, Appalachian State University

 

Abstract

Children living in poverty face challenges progressing through the educational system prepared adequately for college and/or career (ACT, 2015; Newell, 2013). With momentum gained through national movements, such as the First Lady Michele Obama’s 2014 Reach Higher initiative, and state initiatives on college and career readiness, a call has been made to close the existing gap between children from poverty and their peers. The author proposes the use of the CARE model (Foss, Generali, & Kress, 2011) for school counselors to address the disparity between the college and career preparation of students from poverty and their middle and upper class peers.

 

Citation

Johnson, G. S. (2017). School counselors supporting the career and college preparedness of students from poverty: Using the CARE model. Journal of School Counseling, 15(18). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v15n18.pdf

 

Type of Article

Innovative Methods

 

Volume 15, Number 19:

 

“Mexicans are like thieves and bad people, and we’re not really like that”: Immigrant Youth Use Photovoice to Counter Racism and Discrimination

Kevin C. Roxas, Western Washington University, María L. Gabriel, Poudre School District, and Kent Becker, Saybrook University

 

Abstract

One of the fastest growing segments of the student population in the U.S. includes students from immigrant backgrounds. However, there is a lack of research about how school counselors can access and listen to the voices of these youth. This article seeks to add to the existing research on multicultural school counseling for immigrant youth with a focus on students in middle school and proposes photovoice as a culturally responsive method of working with students. Photovoice is a participatory action research method used with marginalized youth that serves to empower participants to represent their point of view and everyday lived realities. The findings from the study include three themes which school counselors can learn from and act upon in their daily work with immigrant youth: middle school immigrant students’ feelings of discrimination, the strengths and assets of their immigrant families, and the need for more support from school counselors.

 

Citation

Roxas, K, C., Gabriel, M. L., & Becker, K. (2017). “Mexicans are like thieves and bad people, and we’re not really like that”: Immigrant youth use photovoice to counter racism and discrimination. Journal of School Counseling, 15(19). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v15n19.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research