Journal of School Counseling

ARTICLE ARCHIVES

2003-2010

 

JSC Home

Current Articles

Editorial Board

Guidelines for Authors

Guidelines for Reviewers

 

Archives

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

---

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

---

2016

2017

 

 

Google
WWW JSC

The articles published in JSC are indexed in ERIC (Education Resources Information Center).

This page lists all articles published from 2003 through 2010.

 
 

2003

Volume 1, Number 1:

 

Professional Identity Development for the School Counselor

Neal Gray, Eastern Kentucky University, and Vivian J. Carroll McCollum, University of New Orleans

 

Abstract

In this article the authors address specific issues that affect the development of professional identity in the school counselor. These issues include the misperceptions of the role of the school counselor by school administrators and personnel, other mental health professionals, and school counselors themselves. It is necessary for school counselors to develop the means necessary to promote and support themselves, along with acquiring a knowledge consisting of skills and techniques, they must also learn who they are and what they do (Remley & Herlihy, 2001). Once the school counselor understands this vital concept it will be easy to articulate it to other school and mental health professionals.

Citation

Gray, N., & McCollum, V. J. C. (2003). Professional identity development for the school counselor. Journal of School Counseling, 1(1). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v1n1.pdf

Type of Article

Professional Development

 

Volume 1, Number 2:

 

Social Skills for Elementary School Children: Hot Frogs Activity

Laura J. Fazio-Griffith, Baton Rouge, Louisiana

 

Abstract

This article will provide school counselors with an activity used in groups to assist elementary school children in identifying and naming feelings.

Citation

Fazio-Griffith, L. J. (2003). Social skills for elementary school children. Journal of School Counseling, 1(2). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v1n2.pdf

Type of Article

Innovative Methods

 
 

2004

Volume 2, Number 1:

 

Emotional/Behavioral Disorders: Understanding the Challenges

Mark D. Nelson, Montana State University - Bozeman, and Tricia Williamson, Flathead High School, Kalispell, Montana

 

Abstract

Children with Emotional/Behavioral Disorders (E/BD) may present a variety of challenges for educators in a school setting. The current trend in public schools is to mainstream children diagnosed with E/BD into regular education classrooms as much as possible (Sutherland, 2000). While few would dispute that mainstreaming children with E/BD is a bad idea, it may cause job-related stress among regular education teachers who have E/BD children in their classrooms (Morin, 2001). This paper offers information that may help teachers work more effectively with students who struggle with E/BD.

Citation

Nelson, M. D., & Williamson, T. (2004). Emotional/behavioral disorders: Understanding the challenges. Journal of School Counseling, 2(1). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v2n1.pdf

Type of Article

Innovative Methods

 

Volume 2, Number 2:

 

School Counseling Programs: Comparing GEAR UP Schools with Non-GEAR UP Schools

Jill M. Thorngren, Mark D. Nelson, and Larry J. Baker, Montana State University - Bozeman

 

Abstract

A survey was conducted using qualitative means to assess school counseling programs in Montana. Schools that were demonstration schools in a federal initiative, Gaining Early Awareness and Readiness for Undergraduate Programs (GEAR UP) were compared to non-GEAR UP schools. Several differences between GEAR UP and non-GEAR UP schools are noted and discussed.

Citation

Thorngren, J. M., Nelson, M. D., & Baker, L. J. (2004). School counseling programs: Comparing GEAR UP schools with non-GEAR UP schools. Journal of School Counseling, 2(2). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v2n2.pdf

Type of Article

Qualitative Research

 

Volume 2, Number 3:

 

Developing a Teen Suicide Prevention Program in the School

Mary Jane Anderson, Augusta State University

 

Abstract

The problem of adolescent suicide worldwide is discussed. Teen suicide is the second leading cause of death among 15-19 year olds in the United Status, and has become an increasing concern for counselors employed in schools. Contributing factors to suicide, such as cultural and socio-demographic factors, dysfunctional family patterns, cognitive style and personality, psychiatric disorders, and current negative life events as triggers of suicidal behavior are reviewed. Marginalized populations are at higher risk of low self-worth and depression, both precursors to suicidal ideation. Most authorities agree that schools should develop a written plan of action for suicide intervention and prevention. The development of a Teen Suicide Prevention Program for a school district in rural Mississippi is reviewed. Steps including negotiation with administrators and policy development, providing faculty/staff in-service, preparation of crisis teams, parent education, classroom presentations, and follow-up are delineated and additional resources are provided.

Citation

Anderson, M. J. (2004). Developing a teen suicide prevention program in the school. Journal of School Counseling, 2(3). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v2n3.pdf

Type of Article

Innovative Methods

 

Volume 2, Number 4:

 

African-American Male Students with Emotional Behavioral Disorders: A Study of the Effects of Ethnic Identity on Preference for School Counselors

Adam Kosnitzky, Lynn University, and Cindy L. Skaruppa, Noel-Levitz Inc.

 

Abstract

This study explored African-American adolescent males with emotional behavioral disorders (EBD) preferences for a school counselor in terms of gender and ethnicity. Participants were administered the Multigroup Ethnic Identity Measure (MEIM) to assess their ethnic identity levels, and the School Counselor Preference Inventory (SCPI) to assess their counselor preferences. Using a 4x2 Multiple Analysis of Variance (MANOVA), results of the study indicated that individuals with higher levels of ethnic identity had stronger preferences for ethnically similar school counselors. When counseling involved personal issues, the participants preferred ethnically similar school counselors regardless of gender. A lack of preference towards White male school counselors resulted when counseling involved career issues.

Citation

Kosnitzky, A., & Skaruppa, C. L. (2004). African-American Male Students with Emotional Behavioral Disorders: A Study of the Effects of Ethnic Identity on Preference for School Counselors. Journal of School Counseling, 2(4). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v2n4.pdf

Type of Article

Quantitative Research

 
 

2005

Volume 3, Number 1:

 

Counseling Global Nomads and Foreign Exchange Students in U.S. Schools

Nancy Bodenhorn, Virginia Tech

 

Abstract

Global nomads are those who spend a significant portion of their developmental years outside the parents’ culture. Many accompany parents on career moves, others complete foreign exchange years with host families. These students provide benefits and challenges to school professionals. This article provides a model of school counselor response when working with global nomad and foreign exchange students derived from previous research and guidelines provided by foreign exchange programs.

 

Citation

Bodenhorn, N. (2005). Counseling global nomads and foreign exchange students in U.S. schools. Journal of School Counseling, (3)1. Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v3n1.pdf

 

Type of Article

Current Issues

Volume 3, Number 2:

 

Providing Efficacy for Solution-Focused Theory in School Counseling Programs

Mark C. Gillen, University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

 

Abstract

Solution-focused theory has been accepted as a useful treatment modality in schools with little empirical evidence regarding its efficacy. This article describes the historical underpinnings and assumptions of solution-focused theory, three studies that examine the effectiveness of solution-focused theory with children in school settings, as well as how solution-focused theory has been integrated into school counseling programs.

 

Citation

Gillen, M. C. (2005). Providing efficacy for solution-focused theory in school counseling programs. Journal of School Counseling, 3(2). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v3n2.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 3, Number 3:

 

The Increasing Need for Quality Alternative Education—A School Counselor’s Perspective

Scott L. Howell, R. Dwight Laws, Russell Bryant, and Ellen Williams, Brigham Young University

 

Abstract

This study focuses on the secondary counselor perspective for students using alternative credit programs, e.g., independent study, evening classes, and summer school, to complement the high school educational experience. Three hundred high school counselors throughout the United States participated in this research that examined which types of students most benefited from these “other” curriculum sources and some of the reasons why. This study also profiled the characteristics of successful alternative education programs. These findings promise to better inform counselors, school administrators, curricular specialists, providers, and students’ themselves about the role alternative education is increasingly having within the secondary schools.

 

Citation

Howell, S. L., Laws, R. D., Bryant, R., & Williams, E. (2005). The increasing need for quality alternative education—a school counselor’s perspective. Journal of School Counseling, 3(3). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v3n3.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 3, Number 4:

 

Multicultural Training for School Counselors: A Course Description

Cheryl Holcomb McCoy, University of Maryland

 

Abstract

This article describes a multicultural counseling course designed specifically for school counselor trainees. Results from a course evaluation are also offered and described. Analyses of the pre- and post-tests indicated an increase in the four dimensions (i.e., multicultural knowledge, multicultural awareness, multicultural skills, and multicultural terminology) of the Multicultural Counseling Competence and Training Survey-Revised (MCCTS-R; Holcomb-McCoy & Myers, 1999). However, there was only a significant increase in students’ level of multicultural knowledge.

 

Citation

McCoy, C. H. (2005). Multicultural training for school counselors: A course description. Journal of School Counseling, 3(4). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v3n4.pdf

 

Type of Article

Professional Development

 

Volume 3, Number 5:

 

Quantum Counseling: A New Perspective for Professional School Counselors

Perry R. Rettig, University of Wisconsin Oshkosh, and Robert Urofsky, Clemson University

 

Abstract

Professional school counselors find themselves working in school organizations that are antiquated and are not a natural fit to the actual work of the counselors. However, lessons being learned from the new sciences and open systems perspectives may shed a great deal of light as to how schools can be restructured in order to best utilize the talents of professional school counselors. This article will begin by showing how schools are currently structured and subsequently flawed. This introduction will be followed by a brief description of the lessons of the new sciences. We conclude by discussing the implications and applications of these new lessons as they relate to school organization and to the work of school counselors.

 

Citation

Rettig, P. R., & Urofsky, R. (2005). Quantum counseling: A new perspective for professional school counselors. Journal of School Counseling, 3(5). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v3n5.pdf

 

Type of Article

Current Issues

 

Volume 3, Number 6:

 

Principals, Release These People!

Kimberly McLeod, Texas Southern University

 

Abstract

Counselors are pinnacle partners in addressing No Child Left Behind legislation and academic reform initiatives in urban schools. Unfortunately, many times the role and responsibility of the school counselor is misunderstood, underutilized and inappropriately administered in menial and routine tasks on campus. This article discusses the professional potential school counselors have in reducing achievement gap and working with campus administration in true leadership collaborations that address the academic needs of public school youth.

 

Citation

McLeod, K. (2005). Principals release there people! Journal of School Counseling, 3(6). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v3n6.pdf

 

Type of Article

Current Issues

 

Volume 3, Number 7:

 

Tuning In While Growing Up: Messages Adolescents Receive From Popular Music Regarding Relationships

J. Scott Glass, East Carolina University, Russ Curtis, Western Carolina University, and George M. Thomas, Mississippi State University – Meridian

 

Abstract

Music has long been important to adolescents. It is one way they can express themselves and find a voice to represent the special circumstances they experience as young people. It is also known that love and romance are an important part of the adolescent experience (Paul & White, 1990). So, what messages do adolescents learn about relationships through popular music? This article examines the romantic themes present in the top songs from the past 20 years of popular music, and presents ideas about how this information can be used by school counselors working with adolescents.

 

Citation

Glass, J. S., Curtis, R., & Thomas, G. M. (2005). Tuning in while growing up: Messages adolescents receive from popular music regarding relationships. Journal of School Counseling, 3(7). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v3n7.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory & Research

 

Volume 3, Number 8:

 

Black Butterfly: A Statement on Counseling Minority Youth

Kimberly McLeod, Texas Southern University

 

Abstract

There are numerous challenges present when non-minority therapists engage in counseling relationships with minority clients. Several issues from the therapist’s perspective are presented and various suggestions are offered to non-minority therapists working with minority clients.

 

Citation

McLeod, K. (2005). Black butterfly: A statement on counseling minority youth. Journal of School Counseling, 3(8). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v3n8.pdf

 

Type of Article

Current Issues

 

Volume 3, Number 9:

 

Educators’ Responses to Internalizing and Externalizing Symptomatology in Children: Implications for School Professionals

Steve Sternlof, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, and Terry M. Pace and Denise Beesley, University of Oklahoma

 

Abstract

This study examined the relationship between educators’ ratings (N = 182) of interpersonal attractiveness and rejection for children exhibiting internalizing and externalizing behaviors. Results revealed that internalizing behavior was perceived to be less interpersonally attractive but was not necessarily seen with greater levels of personal rejection. Externalizing behavior was perceived negatively on both interpersonal attractiveness and personal rejection measures. Ratings of personal rejection for externalizing behavior were greater than ratings of rejection for internalizing behavior. Implications as to the role of school counselors in providing specialized training, professional development, and consultation are addressed along with directions for future research.

 

Citation

Sternlof, S., Pace, T. M., & Beesley, D. (2005). Educators’ responses to internalizing and externalizing symptomatology in children: Implications for school professionals. Journal of School Counseling, 3(9). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v3n9.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 
 

2006

Volume 4, Number 1:

 

Working With Latina Adolescents in Online Support Groups

Debra J. Archuleta, Linda G. Castillo, and Jennifer J. King, Texas A&M University

 

Abstract

Latina students face many challenges that can lead to school dropout. Although school counselors have the skills and training to provide counseling and guidance to students at-risk for dropping out of school, they are often placed in positions where their role is primarily administrative. This paper describes an online support group developed by two rural school districts and a university counseling program in order to address the needs of Latina students.

 

Citation

Archuleta, D. J., Castillo, L. G., and King, J. J. (2006). Working with Latina adolescents in online support groups. Journal of School Counseling, 4(1). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v4n1.pdf

 

Type of Article

Innovative Methods

 

Volume 4, Number 2:

 

The Use of Psychodrama Techniques for Students With Asperger’s Disorder

Samira Munir, Round Rock Independent School District, and Edward Scholwinski and Jon Lasser, Texas State University

 

Abstract

Asperger’s Disorder (AD) is a pervasive developmental disorder affecting social functioning and behavioral interest and activities. The purpose of this article is to inform school counselors of the characteristic features of AD, common interventions being implemented, and the techniques associated with the practice of psychodrama that appear to have particular relevance in facilitating the generalization of social skills for students with AD. The merits of using psychodrama over other school counseling therapeutic approaches are considered, with an emphasis on the interface of psychodramatic techniques and key features of AD.

 

Citation

Munir, S., Scholwinski, E., & Lasser, J. (2006). The use of psychodrama techniques for students with Asperger’s Disorder. Journal of School Counseling, 4(2). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v4n2.pdf

 

Type of Article

Innovative Methods

 

Volume 4, Number 3:

 

Rapport-Building With Resistant Children: Re-Conceptualizing Relational Dynamics

Joshua M. Gold, University of South Carolina

 

Abstract

This paper briefly reviews existing conceptualizations of resistance in counseling children. The author posits that resistance is an “expected” aspect of all counseling and offers an alternative orientation toward client resistance based on exploring the child’s “helping narratives.” Two case studies illustrate the implementation of this intervention and its integration within the rapport-building process of counseling with children.

 

Citation

Gold, J. M. (2006). Rapport-building with resistant children: Re-conceptualizing relational dynamics. Journal of School Counseling, 4(3). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v4n3.pdf

 

Type of Article

Innovative Methods

 

Volume 4, Number 4:

 

The Impact of Childhood Obesity Upon Academic, Personal/Social, and Career Development: Implications for Professional School Counselors

Mary B. Ballard and Hunter D. Alessi, Southeastern Louisiana University

 

Abstract

This article examines the impact of childhood obesity upon the academic, career, and personal/social development of students. The four components of the American School Counselor Association’s (ASCA) delivery model, (classroom guidance, consultation, responsive services, and system support), are utilized to offer suggestions to the professional school counselor (PSC) for designing programs aimed at addressing the growing problem of childhood obesity. It is the goal of this article to enlighten PSCs and encourage immediate action.

 

Citation

Ballard, M. B., & Alessi, H. D. (2006). The impact of childhood obesity upon academic, personal/social, and career development: Implications for professional school counselors. Journal of School Counseling, 4(4). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v4n4.pdf

 

Type of Article

Current Issues

 

Volume 4, Number 5:

 

Fragile Friendships: Exploring the Use and Effects of Indirect Aggression Among Adolescent Girls

Julaine E. Field, Slippery Rock University, Laura M. Crothers, Duquesne University, and Jered B. Kolbert, Slippery Rock University

 

Abstract

This study investigated the roles of relational and social aggression in the friendships of adolescent females. Using qualitative methodology, twenty-eight 8th grade female students from a predominantly white, rural, junior high school were invited to discuss how they respond to and cope with conflict in their friendships, identify and describe social and relational aggression, interpret expectations from significant adults regarding conflict management, and use relational and social aggression with peers of equal or greater social status. Themes are presented and discussed as well as implications for school counseling interventions.

 

Citation

Field, J. E., Crothers, L. M., & Kolbert, J. B. (2006). Fragile friendships: Exploring the use and effects of indirect aggression among adolescent girls. Journal of School Counseling, 4(5). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v4n5.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 4, Number 6:

 

Meeting School Counselors’ Supervision Needs: Four Models of Group Supervision

Jeremy M. Linton and Constance J. Deuschle, Indiana University South Bend

 

Abstract

Lack of clinical supervision continues to be a major problem for school counseling practitioners. In this article, the authors describe group supervision as a viable option for addressing this important issue and outline four models of group supervision. Additionally, several considerations for planning and implementing supervision groups in school settings are discussed. The purpose of this review is to provide school counseling practitioners, supervisors, and counselor educators with a basic understanding of group supervision practices and to encourage these professionals to engage in a more detailed exploration of the topic.

 

Citation

Linton, J. M., & Deuschle, C. J. (2006). Meeting school counselors’ supervision needs: Four models of group supervision. Journal of School Counseling, 4(6). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v4n6.pdf

 

Type of Article

Innovative Methods

 

Volume 4, Number 7:

 

Understanding Gender Differences in Children’s Adjustment to Divorce: Implications for School Counselors

Joe H. Brown and Pedro R. Portes, University of Louisville

 

Abstract

The present paper discusses some of the current issues confronting practitioners and researchers in understanding gender differences in children’s adjustment to divorce. Gender differences in children’s developmental adjustment to divorce are influenced by pre and post divorce development processes, parent expectation and children’s coping abilities. Current research indicates that boys and girls are affected differentially by divorce with boys experiencing greater maladjustment resulting from divorce related processes. Recommendations are provided for practitioners who work with children of divorce and their families in the home and school.

 

Citation

Brown, J. H., & Portes, P. R. (2006). Understanding gender differences in children’s adjustment to divorce: Implications for school counselors. Journal of School Counseling, 4(7). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v4n7.pdf

 

Type of Article

Current Issues

 

Volume 4, Number 8:

 

As Mentoring Flourishes, So Does the Intern

Sandee Bonura, Chapman University

 

Abstract

All university counselors-in-training complete internships under a “qualified” veteran. With a “swim or sink” mentality, an enthusiastic/competent student can be reduced to an insecure and discouraged intern, because supervisors don’t have essential mentoring skills. Beliefs and attitudes are acquired/internalized during internship and veterans influence this experience and ensuing attitudes profoundly. Without quality mentorship, interns may perceive themselves ill suited for the profession. Simply put, when mentoring flourishes, everyone benefits.

 

Citation

Bonura, S. (2006). As mentoring flourishes, so does the intern. Journal of School Counseling, 4(8). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v4n8.pdf

 

Type of Article

Current Issues

 

Volume 4, Number 9:

 

Addressing Conduct Disorder in Elementary School Children: An Application of the ASCA National Model

Stephen P. Demanchick, University of Rochester, Malathi Rangan, National Institute for the Mentally Handicapped, Secunderabad, India, and Kathryn Douthit, University of Rochester

 

Abstract

The range of management strategies for school counselors dealing with conduct disorder in elementary school children can be expanded through an integration of several of the principles of the ASCA National Model®. This paper discusses ways the counselor can use the model to assist struggling children, teachers, administrators, and families as they cope with conduct issues that affect social, emotional and academic competencies. The diagnostic criteria of conduct disorder, as specified by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision (DSM-IV-TR), are presented and risk factors for conduct disorder are summarized. Finally, a Cumulative Risk Intervention Model for use in elementary schools is elaborated.

 

Citation

Demanchick. S. P., Rangan, M., & Douthit, K. (2006). Addressing conduct disorder in elementary school children: An application of the ASCA National Model. Journal of School Counseling, 4(9). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v4n9.pdf

 

Type of Article

Current Issues

 

Volume 4, Number 10:

 

Leadership With Administration: Securing Administrative Support for Transforming Your Program

Kelli A. Saginak, University of Wisconsin Oshkosh, and Colette T. Dollarhide, University of South Carolina

 

Abstract

This article provides school counselors with a plan for securing administrative support for implementing of comprehensive school counseling programs. Systems and systems theory is introduced to explain systemic change in the context of leadership. Leadership theory is presented to assist school counselors in leading systemic change and securing support for program development from administrators and other critical stakeholders.

 

Citation

Saginak, K. A., & Dollarhide, C. T. (2006). Leadership with administration: Securing administrative support for transforming your program. Journal of School Counseling, 4(10). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v4n10.pdf

 

Type of Article

Current Issues

 

Volume 4, Number 11:

 

Promoting a Pro-College Culture With At-Risk Students: School Counselors’ Perspectives

Jill M. Thorngren, Jayne Downey, and Mark D. Nelson, Montana State University

 

Abstract

There are several factors that encourage at-risk students to finish high school and continue to pursue post-secondary education. Some school counseling programs have combined these factors in an attempt to foster a pro-college culture within their schools. Using qualitative methods, a study was conducted to assess school counselors’ perspectives regarding the factors that related to creating and maintaining a pro-college culture. Results and a discussion of the findings are presented.

 

Citation

Thorngren, J. T., Downey, J., & Nelson, M. D. (2006). Promoting a pro-college culture with at-risk students: School counselors’ perspectives. Journal of School Counseling, 4(11). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v4n11.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 4, Number 12:

 

Comparing the Roles of School Counselors and School Psychologists: A Study of Preservice Teachers

Randall L. Astramovich and Scott A. Loe, University of Nevada, Las Vegas

 

Abstract

The specific roles of school counselors and school psychologists are frequently misunderstood by students, parents, and other education professionals. This article presents results from a study of preservice teachers’ (N = 111) views of the functions of school counselors and school psychologists in helping students. Results suggest that preservice teachers distinguish between school counselor and school psychologist roles in promoting student career readiness and personal social development, while no distinctions are made between supporting student academic development and providing counseling services. Implications for professional school counselors and counselor education are discussed.

 

Citation

Astramovich, R. L., & Loe, S. A. (2006). Comparing the roles of school counselors and school psychologists: A study of preservice teachers Journal of School Counseling, 4(12). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v4n12.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 4, Number 13:

 

School Counselors’ Training and Involvement in School-Family-Community Partnership Roles: An Exploratory Study

Julia Bryan, College of William and Mary, and Cheryl Holcomb-McCoy, University of Maryland at College Park

 

Abstract

Seventy-two (n = 72) school counselors from South Carolina were surveyed to assess their perceptions of their pre-service training in relation to eight school-family-community partnership roles and their perceived level of involvement in these roles, This exploratory study sought to determine whether school counselors varied by school level in their perceptions of their training and involvement and whether or not significant relationships existed between perceptions of pre-service training and perceived level of involvement in the eight partnership roles. Implications for practice, training, and research are discussed.

 

Citation

Bryan, J., & Holcomb-McCoy, C. (2006). School counselors’ training and involvement in school-family-community partnership roles: An exploratory study. Journal of School Counseling, 4(13). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v4n13.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 4, Number 14:

 

Principals’ Perceptions of School Counselor Roles and Satisfaction With School Counseling Services

Denise Beesley and Lisa L. Frey, University of Oklahoma

 

Abstract

This study surveyed principals (N = 303) across the nation about their perceptions of school counselor roles and satisfaction with counseling services. Results from this exploratory study revealed that principals reported overall satisfaction with counseling services, although satisfaction varied across levels (elementary, middle school/junior high, high school) and service area. Suggestions are offered by principals for improving counseling services. Implications for school counselor training, opportunities for collaborative school counselor-principal partnerships, and the need for additional research are also presented.

 

Citation

Beesley, D., & Frey, L. L. (2006). Principals’ perceptions of school counselor roles and satisfaction with school counseling services. Journal of School Counseling, 4(14). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v4n14.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 4, Number 15:

 

Self-Injurious Behavior: Characteristics and Innovative Treatment Strategies

Michelle Dykes, Southeast Kentucky Community & Technical College, Victoria Specian and Meredith Nelson, Louisiana State University – Shreveport, and Neal Gray, Eastern Kentucky University

 

Abstract

Self-injurious behavior is the intentional harming of one’s own body. Little attention has been given to SIB in the past, particularly in terms of innovative treatment approaches. Adolescents are at a particularly high-risk for developing this ineffectual coping mechanism. School counselors are in a unique position to aid in the identification of this potentially deadly behavior. The characteristics and etiology of self-injurious behavior are presented, and innovative treatment strategies are outlined.

 

Citation

Dykes, M., Specian, V., Nelson, M., & Gray, N. (2006). Self-injurious behavior: Characteristics and innovative treatment strategies. Journal of School Counseling, 4(15). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v4n15.pdf

 

Type of Article

Current Issues

 

Volume 4, Number 16:

 

Overrepresentation of African American Males in Special Education Programs: Implications and Advocacy Strategies for School Counselors

Carla Adkison-Bradley, Phillip D. Johnson, Glinda Rawls, and Darryl Plunkett, Western Michigan University

 

Abstract

Overrepresentation of African Americans in special education programs has engendered much concern within the education community. However, little information is available on how the counseling profession can advocate for this particular population. The purpose of this article is to illuminate information pertaining to the overrepresentation of African American males in special education. Strategies for school counselors to intervene and advocate for African American males and their families will also be discussed.

 

Citation

Adkison-Bradley, C., Johnson, P. D., Rawls, G., & Plunkett, D. (2006). Overrepresentation of African American males in special education programs: Implications and advocacy strategies for school counselors. Journal of School Counseling, 4(16). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v4n16.pdf

 

Type of Article

Current Issues

 

Volume 4, Number 17:

 

Facilitating the Transition Between Play in the Classroom and Play Therapy

Joel Muro, Karen Petty, and Mavis DakoGyeke, Texas Woman’s University

 

Abstract

Play therapists, school counselors, and play developmentalists have much in common as they work with children in clinical, classroom settings, and after school programs. A strong relationship can be forged among the developmentalists (those trained in early child development/education) and those who work with children in program settings (e.g., therapists and counselors). In order to overcome the barriers that are present in responding to the experiences and challenges that children face, this article contends that play therapists, counselors, and play developmentalists can work with children in large play spaces or groups or with single children and exchange valuable information to provide positive experiences.

 

Citation

Muro, J., Petty, K., & DakoGyeke, M. (2006). Facilitating the transition between play in the classroom and play therapy. Journal of School Counseling, 4(17). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v4n17.pdf

 

Type of Article

Current Issues

 

Volume 4, Number 18:

 

School Counselors and Self-Injurious Behaviors: Assessing Perceptions, Prevalence, and Training Issues

Heather C. Trepal, The University of Texas at San Antonio, and Kelly L. Wester, The University of North Carolina at Greensboro

 

Abstract

Despite the fact that self-injurious behaviors are gaining increased attention in the schools, little is actually known about prevalence, treatment considerations, and school counselor training issues. This article will present the results from a national survey of American School Counselor Association (ASCA) members regarding their perceptions of self-injurious behaviors. Particular attention will be paid to training issues and best practices when working with students who self-injure.

 

Citation

Trepal, H. C., & Wester, K. L. (2006). School counselors and self-injurious behaviors: Assessing perceptions, prevalence, and training issues. Journal of School Counseling, 4(18). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v4n18.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 4, Number 19:

 

Mentoring Programs for First-Year Elementary School Counselors: An Exploratory Study

Stephen A. Armstrong, and Richard S. Balkin, Texas A&M University-Commerce, Rosita Long, Dallas, Texas, and Charmaine Caldwell, Texas A&M University-Commerce

 

Abstract

This exploratory study examined the importance of a mentoring program using a purposeful sample of 16 first-year elementary school counselors. A qualitative analysis revealed the importance of support that participants received from their mentors and mentoring cohort group. Participants also indicated an increase in self-efficacy as a result of the mentoring program. Implications for counselor induction and preparation are discussed.

 

Citation

Armstrong, S. A., Balkin, R. S., Long, R., & Caldwell, C. (2006). Mentoring programs for first-year elementary school counselors: An exploratory study. Journal of School Counseling, 4(19). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v4n19.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 4, Number 20:

 

Culturally-Competent School Counseling With Asian American Adolescents

Linda G. Castillo and Marion J. Phoummarath, Texas A&M University

 

Abstract

Asian American adolescents are frequently overlooked as a population in need of counseling interventions. However, cultural issues such as refugee status or the pressure of high academic achievement can influence an Asian American student’s mental health. As there is a dearth of school counseling literature written about what school counselors should be aware of when working with Asian American adolescents, the purpose of this paper is to provide school counselors with knowledge, awareness, and skills needed to work with Asian American youth and families in the schools. An historical overview of Asian immigration and common cultural beliefs are discussed. A model for working with Asian American adolescents in the schools is provided as well as suggestions for counseling with Asian American adolescents.

 

Citation

Castillo, L. G., & Phoummarath, M. J. (2006). Culturally-competent school counseling with Asian American adolescents. Journal of School Counseling, 4(20). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v4n20.pdf

 

Type of Article

Innovative Methods

 

Volume 4, Number 21:

 

Development and Field Test of an Employment Interview Instrument for Secondary School Counselors

Marybeth Green, Shawnee Mission Northwest High School, and Howard Ebmeier, University of Kansas

 

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to identify the major components of a secondary school counselor’s job and translate these job responsibilities into an instrument that could be used by school administrators to identify high quality secondary school counselors during the employment interview. A review of literature resulted in the identification of 37 competencies deemed essential in defining a quality secondary school counselor. The competencies were then used in the development of an instrument that was evaluated utilizing school counselors and administrators.

 

Citation

Green, M., & Ebmeier, H. (2006). Development and field test of an employment interview instrument for secondary school counselors Journal of School Counseling, 4(21). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v4n21.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 4, Number 22:

 

Students with Sensory Integration Dysfunctions: Issues for School Counselors

Idit Katz, Ben-Gurion University, Israel

 

Abstract

A substantial number of school age children suffer from difficulties in integrating sensory input in an adaptive manner (termed sensory integration dysfunction – SID). These students are at high risk for emotional, social, and educational problems. This article defines SID, describes typical behaviors of children with SID, and presents guidelines for school counselors in their intervention concerning students with SID.

 

Citation

Katz, I. (2006). Students with sensory integration dysfunctions: Issues for school counselors. Journal of School Counseling, 4(22). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v4n22.pdf

 

Type of Article

Current Issues

 

Volume 4, Number 23:

 

Solution Focused Empathy Training Groups for Students With Fire-setting Behaviors

Janet G. Froeschle, West Texas A&M University

 

Abstract

Fire-setting students are those who intentionally or unintentionally set one or more fires due to curiosity, stress, a need for attention, or due to criminal delinquency. This article describes the nature of fire-setting behaviors, discusses the profile and risk factors associated with the behavior, and outlines a group program using empathy training and solution focused brief therapy. The benefits of using solution focused brief therapy and empathy training are discussed along with specific techniques involved in using each component.

 

Citation

Froeschle, J. G. (2006). Solution focused empathy training groups for students with fire-setting behaviors. Journal of School Counseling, 4(23). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v4n23.pdf

 

Type of Article

Innovative Methods

 

Volume 4, Number 24:

 

Implications for Collaboration: An Investigation With School Counselors and School Psychologists

Pamela E. Guess, University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, and Mark C. Gillen and Scott E. Woitaszewski, University of Wisconsin-River Falls

 

Abstract

Collaboration is an interactive process that has become mandated as a part of educational decision-making. School counselors and school psychologists are now guided by professional principles that advocate interdisciplinary collaboration. This study identified activities for which these professionals currently collaborated with each other, as well as desired activities for collaboration. Demographic factors that appeared related to amounts of collaboration were also identified. Years of experience, gender, and administrative support were factors that significantly influenced collaboration. Implications for school practitioners are discussed.

 

Citation

Guess, P. E., Gillen, M. C., & Woitaszewski, S. E. (2006). Implications for collaboration: An investigation with school counselors and school psychologists. Journal of School Counseling, 4(24). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v4n24.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 4, Number 25:

 

Effective Transition Services for Students With Disabilities: Examining the Roles of Building Principals and School Counselors

La Tonya L. Gillis, The College of William and Mary

 

Abstract

As educators prepare secondary students for post-graduate experiences, students with disabilities are often exposed to fewer opportunities that prepare them to be responsible and productive members of society. Building level administrators and school counselors are vital members in assuring that students with disabilities are included in as many post-secondary opportunities as their non-disabled peers. A collaborative effort between students, parents, teachers, counselors, and principals must occur in order to provide students with disabilities effective transition services that will allow them to become contributing members of the community.

 

Citation

Gillis, L. L. (2006). Effective transition services for students with disabilities: Examining the roles of building principals and school counselors. Journal of School Counseling, 4(25). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v4n25.pdf

 

Type of Article

Innovative Methods

 
 

2007

Volume 5, Number 1:

 

The Role of the Middle School Counselor in Preventing Bullying

Nancy J. Cunningham and Michael Whitten, University of Louisville

 

Abstract

Middle school counselors are in a strategic position to provide leadership in promotion of bullying prevention efforts in their schools. This article provides middle school counselors with an understanding of early adolescent bullying, an overview of a comprehensive set of interventions that can be implemented to support a whole-school approach to addressing bullying, and suggestions for how middle school counselors can support the adoption and implementation of such an approach in their schools.

 

Citation

Cunningham, N. J., & Whitten, M. (2007). The role of the middle school counselor in preventing bullying. Journal of School Counseling, 5(1). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v5n1.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 5, Number 2:

 

Professional Development and School Counselors: A Study of Utah School Counselor Preferences and Practices

Scott L. Howell, Brigham Young University, Kathryn S. Bitner, Oak Canyon Junior High, Lindon, Utah, N. Jonnell Henry, Chapel Hill Elementary School, Decatur, Georgia, and Dennis L. Eggett, G. John Bauman Jr., Octavia Sawyer, and Russell Bryant, Brigham Young University

 

Abstract

This study investigated the professional development needs, preferences, and practices of secondary school counselors in Utah. Participants included 226 secondary school counselors who responded to a 20-question survey instrument. The respondents revealed that most of them exceed minimum licensure requirements for professional development but also spend significant amounts of personal time and expense to do so. The counselors also identified obstacles with, and preferences toward, professional development that they experience in the increasingly complex and sophisticated school environment. Findings will inform professional development policy and practice in the state and also provide a basis for future research.

 

Citation

Howell, S. L., Bitner, K. S., Henry, N. J., Eggett, D. L., Bauman Jr., J., Sawyer, O., & Bryant, R. (2007). Professional development and school counselors: A study of Utah school counselor preferences and practices. Journal of School Counseling, 5(2). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v5n2.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 5, Number 3:

 

Improving Survey Response Rates of School Counselors: Comparing the Use of Incentives

Sheri Bauman, University of Arizona

 

Abstract

This article examines the effectiveness of incentives in improving survey response rates of school counselors and compares the findings with those of previously researched populations. A $1 cash incentive increased response rates for a one-wave mailing of a questionnaire, while a raffle opportunity did not. The number and length of optional comments did not differ by incentive condition. These results are viewed in the context of theoretical perspectives for understanding mailed questionnaire response decisions.

 

Citation

Bauman, S. (2007). Improving survey response rates of school counselors: Comparing the use of incentives. Journal of School Counseling, 5(3). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v5n3.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 5, Number 4:

 

Self-Efficacy as a Function of Attributional Feedback

Sachin Jain, University of Texas-Pan American, Mary Alice Bruce and John Stellern, University of Wyoming, and Namita Srivastava, Dua Neuro Psychiatric Center, Lakhimpur-Kheri UP India

 

Abstract

The researchers investigated the effect of attributional feedback on self efficacy judgments among a sample of 192 eighth grade students. Self efficacy judgments were measured by the scale developed by Bandura and Schunk (1981). The results showed that improvement in self efficacy judgments was significantly more for attributional feedback conditions as compared to no attributional feedback conditions. When different feedback conditions were compared, it was found that the effort feedback affected the self efficacy judgments most positively; ability feedback was second, and ability + effort was in the third position.

 

Citation

Jain, S., Bruce, M. A., Stellern, J., & Srivastava, N. (2007). Self-efficacy as a function of attributional feedback. Journal of School Counseling, 5(4). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v5n4.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 5, Number 5:

 

Students’ Reported Contact With and Perception of the Role of High School Counselors: An Examination of the ASCA Role Standard Domains

Theresa Coogan and Janice DeLucia-Waack, University at Buffalo, SUNY

 

Abstract

A random convenience sample was compiled using 430 undergraduate students enrolled at a large northeastern university. Reported contact with school counselors in the three ASCA domains (academic, career, personal/social) and effectiveness ratings were examined. Female students reported significantly more contact only on career topics than males. Urban schools reported a significantly higher student to counselor ratio than suburban or rural schools, but lower ratings of effectiveness only than suburban schools. The perception of school counselors providing career assistance more than personal/social and academic assistance was reflected both in contact and perceptions of the role of school counselors.

 

Citation

Coogan, T., & DeLucia-Waack, J. (2007). Students’ reported contact with and perception of the role of high school counselors: An examination of the ASCA role standard domains. Journal of School Counseling, 5(5). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v5n5.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 5, Number 6:

 

Adolescent Girl-to-Girl Bullying: Wellness-Based Interventions for School Counselors

Andrea Dixon Rayle, University of Florida, and Holly J. Hartwig Moorhead, Judy Green, Caryn A. Griffin, and Barbara Ozimek, Walsh University

 

Abstract

Adolescent girl-to-girl bullying is a pervasive concern in schools across the United States. In this article, the authors describe the possible negative effects of girl-to-girl bullying on adolescent females’ development and well-being and describe wellness as it relates to personal and social, academic, and career development of adolescent girls. Finally, the authors suggest relevant wellness-based interventions for school counselors to implement in individual counseling and planning, small group counseling, and large group classroom guidance curricula.

 

Citation

Rayle, A. D., Moohead, H. J. H., Green, J., Griffin, C. A., & Ozimek, B. (2007). Adolescent girl-to-girl bullying: Wellness-based interventions for school counselors. Journal of School Counseling, 5(6). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v5n6.pdf

 

Type of Article

Current Issues

 

Volume 5, Number 7:

 

Managing Student Behavior During Large Group Guidance: What Works Best?

Christopher J. Quarto, Middle Tennessee State University

 

Abstract

Participants provided information pertaining to managing non-task-related behavior of students during large group guidance lessons. In particular, school counselors were asked often how often they provide large group guidance, the frequency of which students exhibit off-task and/or disruptive behavior during guidance lessons, and techniques they use to address such behavior. School counselors also described how they were trained in classroom management and what they perceived to be the most and least effective classroom management techniques.

 

Citation

Quarto, C. (2007). Managing student behavior during large group guidance: What works best? Journal of School Counseling, 5(7). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v5n7.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 5, Number 8:

 

An Exploration of 21st Century School Counselors’ Daily Work Activities

Andrea Dixon Rayle, University of Florida, and Jennifer R. Adams, West Virginia University

 

Abstract

With the current reformation of school counseling and the increasing expectations of school counselors, all counselors’ work activities include some Comprehensive School Counseling Program (CSCP) activities. This exploratory study focused on differential patterns among elementary, middle, and high school counselors’ daily work activities and on several demographic variables. Significant differences were found across demographic variables for the school counselors and for each of the 20 work activities. Implications for practice, training, and future research were considered.

 

Citation

Rayle, A. D., & Adams, J. R. (2007). An exploration of 21st century school counselors’ daily work activities. Journal of School Counseling, 5(8). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v5n8.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 5, Number 9:

 

Journaling: An Underutilized School Counseling Tool

Brett Zyromski, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale

 

Abstract

The effectiveness of journaling as a therapeutic and teaching tool is well documented. However, specific examples of school counselors utilizing journaling as a therapeutic tool are sparse. Existing school counseling literature was reviewed and journaling as an educational and therapeutic tool was explored and related to the school counseling environment. Suggestions for using journaling as an effective school counseling resource were offered, and possible applications of online and paper and pencil journaling as a school counseling tool were presented.

 

Citation

Zyromski, B. (2007). Journaling: An underutilized school counseling tool. Journal of School Counseling, 5(9). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v5n9.pdf

 

Type of Article

Innovative Methods

 

Volume 5, Number 10:

 

State Licensure Requirements for School Counselors: Implications for Multicultural Continuing Education

Glinda Rawls, Western Michigan University

 

Abstract

While most counselor education programs offer training or coursework in multicultural counseling at the pre-service level, it is unclear to what extent school counselors continue to pursue professional development in multicultural counseling after obtaining state certification or licensure. This manuscript presents a discussion on the state credentialing and professional development requirements of school counselors. Implications for future research on the professional development of school counselors in multicultural training will also be discussed.

 

Citation

Rawls, G. (2007). State licensure requirements for school counselors: Implications for multicultural continuing education. Journal of School Counseling, 5(10). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v5n10.pdf

 

Type of Article

Current Issues

 

Volume 5, Number 11:

 

Career Planning With Students With and Without Disabilities: A Study of Illinois School Counselors

Carla R. Adkison-Bradley, Paula D. Kohler, Elizabeth Bradshaw, E. Brooks Applegate, Xiaofan Cai, and Janee Steele, Western Michigan University

 

Abstract

Career development is an essential role of the school counselor. This study examined the role of school counselors in assisting middle school and high school students with choosing careers. Special attention is given to school counselors working with students with and without disabilities. Results indicated that school counselors spend more counseling time with students without disabilities. Implications for school counseling practice are discussed.

 

Citation

Adkison-Bradley, C. R, Kohler, P. D., Bradshaw, E., Applegate, E. B., Cai, X., & Steele, J. (2007). Career planning with students with and without disabilities: A study of Illinois school counselors. Journal of School Counseling, 5(11). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v5n11.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 5, Number 12:

 

Visual Layout of Print Questionnaires: Effect on Responses of Middle School Students

Sheri Bauman, University of Arizona, Robert Steiner, New Mexico State University, and Francesca López, University of Arizona

 

Abstract

A three-page questionnaire was modified to a one-page format. Questionnaires were administered in classroom groups to 300 middle school students. Classrooms were randomly divided into two groups, with one group receiving the original three-page format and the other receiving a single-page version of the same questionnaire. The visual layout of the two versions was different, and included variations in font, placement of response options, and spacing. Item non-response was greater for the single-page format. No statistically significant differences were detected between response patterns or internal consistency of the two versions of the questionnaire. Implications for school counselors are discussed.

 

Citation

Bauman, S., Steiner, R., & López, F. (2007). Visual layout of print questionnaires: Effect on responses of middle school students. Journal of School Counseling, 5(12). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v5n12.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 5, Number 13:

 

The Voices of High School Counselors: Lived Experience of Job Stress

Leigh Falls and Mary Nichter, Sam Houston State University

 

Abstract

There is a paucity of literature addressing high school counselors’ experiences of job stress. Our qualitative phenomenological study adds to the professions’ knowledge of job stress as experienced by counselors in large suburban high schools. Our study illustrates the job stress phenomenon in the counselors’ own voices, identifies situations (role ambiguity, role conflict, and work overload) contributing to job stress, and discusses implications for future research and practice.

 

Citation

Falls, L., & Nichter, M. (2007). The voices of high school counselors: Lived experience of job stress. Journal of School Counseling, 5(13). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v5n13.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 5, Number 14:

 

Building Caring Schools: Implications for Professional School Counselors

Shannon L. Ray, Nova Southeastern University, Glenn Lambie, University of Central Florida, Jennifer Curry, Louisiana State University

 

Abstract

Professional school counselors (PSCs) can support school personnel in promoting educational climates conducive to optimal student academic and social development. Critical elements in fostering caring schools include encouraging positive relationships; providing leadership for teachers and school personnel; facilitating collaboration between stakeholders; and providing psychoeducation. This article introduces the qualities and benefits of a caring school climate, outlines the role of PSCs in supporting caring schools, and offers practical implications and a case illustration of a PSC supporting a positive educational climate.

 

Citation

Ray, S. L., Lambie, G., & Curry, J. (2007). Building caring schools: Implications for professional school counselors. Journal of School Counseling, 5(14). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v5n14.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 5, Number 15:

 

Charter School Administrators’ Attitudes and Beliefs Concerning Developmental and Mental Health Services

Robert I. Urofsky, Clemson University, and Claudia J. Sowa, Grand Valley State University

 

Abstract

Charter schools are public schools exempted from certain federal and state regulations in exchange for contracted promises to achieve particular educational goals. The growing popularity of charter schools and the unique place they hold in the school reform movement is bringing them to the attention of educational service providers and the American public. This article introduces information about the charter school movement and presents the results of a survey that investigated charter school administrators’ attitudes and beliefs regarding developmental and mental health services. Implications for professional school counselors are examined.

 

Citation

Urofsky, R. I., & Sowa, C. J. (2007). Charter school administrators’ attitudes and beliefs concerning developmental and mental health services. Journal of School Counseling, 5(15). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v5n15.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 5, Number 16:

 

Reframing Class Scheduling: Seven School Counselor Benefits, Challenges, Considerations, and Recommendations

Lisa Wines, Cypress-Fairbanks Independent School District, and Judith A. Nelson and Daniel Eckstein, Sam Houston State University

 

Abstract

The American School Counseling Association (ASCA) identifies scheduling students for classes as a non-counseling activity. Ideally, school counselors should limit non-counseling activities, but the reality is that counselors do in fact spend much time and energy scheduling classes, according to a recent survey of secondary counselors. We introduce a cognitive reframing of the task of scheduling classes as well as seven specific benefits, challenges, considerations, and concluding recommendations.

 

Citation

Wines, L., Nelson, J. A., & Eckstein, D. (2007). Reframing class scheduling: Seven school counselor benefits, challenges, considerations, and recommendations. Journal of School Counseling, 5(16). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v5n16.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 5, Number 17:

 

UNCOPE: Evaluation of a Brief Screen for Detecting Substance Dependence Among Juvenile Justice Populations

Robert I. Urofsky and Eric Seiber, Clemson University, and Norman G. Hoffmann, Evince Clinical Assessments, Waynesville, North Carolina

 

Abstract

School counselors need a quick and effective means for determining substance use risk levels among their student population. The current study investigates sensitivity and specificity of a six-item screen, the UNCOPE, with a sample of adjudicated adolescents. Analysis reveals that the UNCOPE screen possesses suitable sensitivity and specificity to make it acceptable for routine screening applications. While caution must be exercised in applying the UNCOPE to general school populations, the results show a promising potential for it to serve as a tool for school counselors. Further research should examine the sensitivity and specificity of the UNCOPE screen with diverse student populations.

 

Citation

Urofsky, R. I., Seiber, E., & Hoffmann, N. G. (2007). UNCOPE: Evaluation of a brief screen for detecting substance dependence among juvenile justice populations. Journal of School Counseling, 5(17). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v5n17.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 5, Number 18:

 

Sensory Integration Dysfunction: Implications for Counselors Working with Children

Rebecca L. Withrow, University of North Carolina, Greensboro

 

Abstract

Sensory Integration Dysfunction (SID), a sensory processing problem that afflicts about 15% of children, sets many children on a developmental trajectory of emotional and social problems. Children with SID often unintentionally alienate parents, peers, and teachers in their efforts to modify the amounts of sensory stimulation they receive. They then miss out on the social and cognitive interactions needed for healthy development, and develop secondary mental health problems such as fear, loneliness, and low self-esteem. Counselors who understand SID can intervene to help these children get “back on track” with normative social and cognitive development.

 

Citation

Withrow, R. L. (2007). Sensory integration dysfunction: Implications for counselors working with children. Journal of School Counseling, 5(18). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v5n18.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 5, Number 19:

 

Secondary School Counselors as Educational Leaders: Shifting Perceptions of Leadership

Angella D. Ford and Judith A. Nelson, Sam Houston State University

 

Abstract

School counselors are currently being charged to become active participants in systemic change for student achievement. This will require leadership. Our study was significant in that it complemented and perpetuated the vision and direction of the school counseling field. This empirical study investigates school counselors’ perceptions of leadership, specifically their roles as educational leaders in their present school settings. Our study was a qualitative inquiry into a select number of Texas high school counselors with years of experience ranging from three years to thirty-two years. This collaborative study provided insight into counselors’ views of leadership. Our study results indicated that respondents have the tools to be educational leaders. However, some of the tools are misunderstood, underutilized, unrecognized and/or used incorrectly.

 

Citation

Ford, A. D., & Nelson, J. A. (2007). Secondary school counselors as educational leaders: Shifting perceptions of leadership. Journal of School Counseling, 5(19). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v5n19.pdf

 

Type of Article

Current Issues

 

Volume 5, Number 20:

 

Girls Involved in Real Life Sharing: Utilizing Technology to Support the Emotional Development of Teenaged Girls

Shaundra B. Daily and Rosalind W. Picard, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

 

Abstract

This paper describes a new digital technology to support emotional self-awareness and empathy, called G.I.R.L.S (Girls Involved in Real Life Sharing). The system invited users to reflect actively upon and interact with a dialogue about how the story made them feel through the construction of pictorial narratives. In a pilot study with teenage girls, the system enabled the subjects to express themselves freely in a comfortable and meaningful way, and fostered an increase in emotional expressivity as compared to a control group. While the system has been tested with a small group of minority middle-school children, a web version of the system is in development that we believe will be useful for school counselors.

 

Citation

Daily, S. B., & Picard, R. W. (2007). Girls involved in real life sharing: Utilizing technology to support the emotional development of teenaged girls. Journal of School Counseling, 5(20). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v5n20.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 5, Number 21:

 

Evaluating School Counseling Websites: An Evaluation Tool

Glenda P. Reynolds, Auburn University Montgomery, and Helen Kitchens, Troy University Montgomery

 

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to describe the use of a webpage evaluation for imbedding technology in classes for teaching school counseling and counseling program development. The instructors created the Website Evaluation Form to help students recognize qualities of webpages that would enhance the school counseling program, broaden their information base about what counselors are doing over a large geographical area, and plan for their own website.

 

Citation

Reynolds, G. P., & Kitchens, H. (2007). Evaluating school counseling websites: An evaluation tool. Journal of School Counseling, 5(21). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v5n21.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 5, Number 22:

 

International Adoption of Post-Institutionalized Children: Implications for School Counselors

Karyn B. Purvis, David R. Cross, and Jacquelyn S. Pennings, Texas Christian University

 

Abstract

During the last decade, nearly 190,000 children from outside the United States have been adopted by families in the United States, and many of these children have experienced orphanage care. These children are vulnerable to a complex constellation of deficits crossing behavioral, physical, educational and emotional domains. Parents and schools are often unprepared for the needs of these post-institutionalized adopted children. School counselors are in a unique position to help educators and parents develop appropriate interventions for these children. This article contains a brief review of the literature on post-institutionalized adopted children and implications for school counselors in interacting with these children, their parents, and their teachers.

 

Citation

Purvis, K. B., Cross, D. R., & Pennings, J. S. (2007). International adoption of post-institutionalized children: Implications for school counselors. Journal of School Counseling, 5(22). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v5n22.pdf

 

Type of Article

Current Issues

 

Volume 5, Number 23:

 

School Counselor Involvement in Postsecondary Transition Planning for Students with Disabilities

Amy Milsom, University of North Carolina at Greensboro

 

Abstract

School counselors are charged with addressing the career development and transition needs of all students (American School Counseling Association [ASCA], 2005), yet research has revealed that not all school counselors are involved in postsecondary transition planning for students with disabilities. This exploratory study examined high school counselor involvement in postsecondary transition planning activities for students with disabilities. Recommendations regarding the collaborative provision of postsecondary transition planning services for students with disabilities are presented.

 

Citation

Milsom, A. (2007). School counselor involvement in postsecondary transition planning for students with disabilities. Journal of School Counseling, 5(23). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v5n23.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 5, Number 24:

 

Counselor Education and Educational Administration: An Exploratory Survey of Collaboration

Rachelle Pérusse, University of Connecticut, Gary E. Goodnough, Plymouth State University, and Tamisha Bouknight, Lehman College

 

Abstract

One way to inform educational administration faculty and future school principals about the role of the school counselor is for counselor educators to collaborate with educational administration faculty. However, there are very few recommendations about how these faculty members might collaborate. In an exploratory national survey, counselor educators were asked how they work collaboratively with educational administration faculty. Over 50% of counselor educators said they collaborated with educational administration faculty at their institution. Results suggested ways in which counselor education faculty might collaborate with educational administration faculty in preparing future school principals to work with school counselors.

 

Citation

Pérusse, R., Goodnough, G. E., & Bouknight, T. (2007). Counselor education and educational administration: An exploratory survey of collaboration. Journal of School Counseling, 5(24). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v5n24.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 5, Number 25:

 

No Childhood Left Behind: Advocating for the Personal and Social Development of Children

Tina R. Paone, Monmouth University, and William J. Lepkowski, St. Cloud State University

 

Abstract

The American School Counselor Association (ASCA) national model recognizes the importance of school counselors addressing the personal and social development of students, as well as the academic development, to ultimately help them succeed. A number of concerns have been raised regarding the impact of the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act on education. This manuscript reports on current criticisms of the NCLB Act’s impact on education and provides arguments for school counselors to use in advocating for the importance of meeting the personal and social needs of all students so schools can truly work toward leaving no child behind.

 

Citation

Paone, T. R., & Lepkowski, W. J. (2007). No childhood left behind: Advocating for the personal and social development of children. Journal of School Counseling, 5(25). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v5n25.pdf

 

Type of Article

Current Issues

 

Volume 5, Number 26:

 

Practicum in Counseling: A New Training Model

Carlo Cuccaro, Lanigan Elementary School, Fulton, New York, and Jean M. Casey, State University of New York at Oswego

 

Abstract

This study examined the effectiveness of a new counseling practicum training model which was developed as part of a Professional Development School (PDS) program. Unlike the traditional counseling practicum, the university instructor and graduate students worked together in an elementary school setting for one day a week. All supervision was provided on-site and the students were given immediate feedback on their counseling strategies and skills. The study examined what differences, if any, existed in student and classroom teachers' perceptions of the PDS practicum versus the traditional practicum experience. Findings concluded that students in the PDS practicum were significantly more positive about their experience than those in the traditional settings. Results from teacher surveys did not reveal significant differences between practicum settings.

 

Citation

Cuccaro, C., & Casey, J. M. (2007). Practicum in counseling: A new training model. Journal of School Counseling, 5(26). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v5n26.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 
 

2008

Volume 6, Number 1:

 

Wellness Interventions for School Counselors: A Case-Study in Treating Asperger’s Disorder

Holly J. Hartwig Moorhead and Judy Green, Walsh University, Rick R. McQuistion, Gentle Shepherd Counseling Center, and Barbara Ozimek, Warren, Ohio

 

Abstract

The Five Factor Wellness Inventory-Elementary Version (5F-WEL –E) was used in a pre- and post-test design to determine the wellness of a 13 year-old male with Asperger’s Disorder. Wellness in the Creative and Physical Self domains was low. Thus, the school counselor implemented a 5-month treatment plan, based upon the Wheel of Wellness, in the school and home to increase wellness in these areas. Physical Self wellness increased. Wellness in other domains was maintained, increased, or slightly decreased. Implications for further research as well as application of wellness-based treatment planning by school counselors are discussed.

 

Citation

Moorhead, H. J. H., Green, J., McQuistion, R. R., & Ozimek, B. (2008). Wellness interventions for school counselors: A case-study in treating Asperger’s disorder. Journal of School Counseling, 6(1). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v6n1.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 6, Number 2:

 

Disc Golf Play: Using Recreation to Improve Disruptive Classroom Behaviors

Michael Lee Powell and Rebecca A. Newgent, University of Arkansas

 

Abstract

This study examined the use of disc golf as a creative, recreational play intervention for improving classroom behaviors in disruptive children. Twenty-two elementary students were randomly selected for either a treatment or control group and rated at pre- and post- by their teachers on the use of nine positive classroom behaviors (e.g., sharing, raising hand, and compliance). Results of a two-way ANOVA with repeated measures and one between-subjects factor revealed a significant difference (p < .0001) between both groups over time. Implications are discussed.

 

Citation

Powell, M. L., & Newgent, R. A. (2008). Disc golf play: Using recreation to improve disruptive classroom behaviors. Journal of School Counseling, 6(2). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v6n2.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 6, Number 3:

 

Students With Emotional Disturbances: How Can School Counselors Serve?

Lynne Guillot Miller and John S. Rainey, Kent State University

 

Abstract

Students with Emotional Disturbances (ED) possess unique characteristics that require additional care from school counselors, teachers, and other school personnel. Information pertaining to the prevalence of ED among students and the common characteristics of students with ED is reviewed. Additionally, ideas and effective approaches that will aid school counselors in meeting the various needs of these students are presented. The purpose of the presented information is to broaden the skill repertoire of school counselors and to enhance the level of service they provide to students with ED.

 

Citation

Miller, L. G., & Rainey, J. S. (2008). Students with emotional disturbances: How can school counselors serve? Journal of School Counseling, 6(3). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v6n3.pdf

 

Type of Article

Current Issues

 

Volume 6, Number 4:

 

A Multicultural Competence Model for Counseling Gifted and Talented Children

Jacob J. Levy, University of Tennessee, and Jonathan A. Plucker, Indiana University

 

Abstract

This paper introduces a model of multicultural competence targeted at school counselors who work or may work with gifted and talented children. The model is designed as an extension of the Multicultural Counseling Competence framework (Sue, D. W., 2001). The present model outlines three competencies believed to be important to efficacious counseling with culturally diverse children identified as gifted and talented: 1) counselor awareness of one’s attitudes, assumptions, and biases about gifted and talented children; 2) understanding the characteristics of, and issues faced by gifted and talented children, and 3) developing appropriate interventions and strategies for counseling gifted and talented children.

 

Citation

Levy, J. L., & Plucker, J. A. (2008). A multicultural competence model for counseling gifted and talented children. Journal of School Counseling, 6(4). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v6n4.pdf

 

Type of Article

Professional Development

 

Volume 6, Number 5:

 

Curanderismo: Folk Healing Practice and Child Abuse and Neglect Allegations

David L. Olguin, University of New Mexico

 

Abstract

Reporting child abuse and neglect is among the myriad issues professional school counselors inevitably encounter. Second-hand allegations further complicate the decision-making process. This article was motivated by an incident in a public elementary school where a family’s folk healing practice (curanderismo) was mistakenly identified as child abuse. The article provides an historical overview of curanderismo and commonly treated symptoms that can be perceived as abuse or neglect. Necessary factors and procedures for school counselors to make informed decisions about second-hand allegations are identified and determined..

 

Citation

Olguin, D. L. (2008). Curanderismo: Folk healing practice and child abuse and neglect allegations. Journal of School Counseling, 6(5). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v6n5.pdf

 

Type of Article

Current Issues

 

Volume 6, Number 6:

 

Designing Developmentally Appropriate School Counseling Interventions for LGBQ Students

Holly Kayler and Todd F. Lewis, The University of North Carolina at Greensboro, and English Davidson, Ragsdale High School

 

Abstract

Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and questioning (LGBQ) students must face the physical, cognitive, and emotional challenges of adolescent development while becoming aware of and coping with a sexual minority orientation. As an invisible minority, LGBQ students are stigmatized, and many experience negative outcomes (e.g., isolation, depression) as a result of heterosexism. The authors discuss how Cass’ model of sexual identity development serves as an appropriate template from which school counselors may work directly with students at each stage of sexual identity development. Additionally, the authors highlight numerous indirect services school counselors can provide to LGBQ students.

 

Citation

Kayler, H., Lewis, T. F., & Davidson, E. (2008). Designing developmentally appropriate school counseling interventions for LGBQ students. Journal of School Counseling, 6(6). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v6n6.pdf

 

Type of Article

Current Issues

 

Volume 6, Number 7:

 

First-Year School Counselors: Examining the Benefits of Informal Support and Mentoring

Amy Milsom and Holly Kayler, The University of North Carolina at Greensboro

 

Abstract

New professionals can benefit from support and mentoring as they transition into their jobs, and research suggests that school counselors often do not receive formal mentoring from other school counselors. In this qualitative study, seven first-year school counselors were asked to keep journals during their first year and to reflect on their experiences, challenges, and supports. Results suggested that school counselors experience support and mentoring in numerous ways even in the absence of formal mentoring programs. Recommendations for establishing informal support networks are provided.

 

Citation

Milsom, A., & Kayler, H. (2008). First-year school counselors: Examining the benefits of informal support and mentoring. Journal of School Counseling, 6(7). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v6n7.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 6, Number 8:

 

School Counseling Intern Roles: Exploration of Activities and Comparison to the ASCA National Model

Wade C. Leuwerke, R. Matthew Bruinekool, and Amy Lane, Drake University

 

Abstract

Examination of 6,556 hours of school counselor interns’ activity logs provided a detailed description of roles and activities. Comparison of counselor intern activities to the ASCA (2005) National Model found consistency between responsive services at the elementary level and both responsive services and guidance curriculum at the middle school level. Identification of time on planning and inappropriate tasks provides a clearer picture of school counseling interns’ activities in the school.

 

Citation

Leuwerke, W. C., Bruinekool, R. M., & Lane, A. (2008). School counseling intern roles: Exploration of activities and comparison to the ASCA National Model. Journal of School Counseling, 6(8). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v6n8.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 6, Number 9:

 

Effectiveness of Wellness-Based Classroom Guidance in Elementary School Settings: A Pilot Study

José A. Villalba and Jane E. Myers, The University of North Carolina at Greensboro

 

Abstract

A three-session, wellness-based classroom guidance unit was developed based on the Indivisible Self wellness model and presented to 55 students in 5th grade. Participants completed the Five Factor Wellness Inventory, Elementary School Version, before and after the unit. Wellness scores were significantly and positively higher at post-testing for Total Wellness and three of five wellness factors addressed in the guidance sessions (Creative, Social, and Physical Self). Follow-up studies revealed that students with low wellness scores at pre-test improved the most. Implications for elementary school counselors are discussed.

 

Citation

Villalba, J. A., & Myers, J. E. (2008). Effectiveness of wellness-based classroom guidance in elementary school settings: A pilot study. Journal of School Counseling, 6(9). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v6n9.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 6, Number 10:

 

Racial Disparities in New Millennium Schools: Implications for School Counselors

Ireon LeBeauf, University of Nevada – Reno

 

Abstract

This article explores the role of race in new millennium schools and its impact on students. Multicultural, psycho-social, and academic issues are addressed, and interventions for school counselors are discussed. Racially correlated disparities in K-12 education are apparent in: test scores, grades, retention and drop-out rates, identification for special education and gifted programs, extracurricular and co-curricular involvement, tracking, and disciplinary rates showing disproportionate disadvantages to students of color. This article identifies the primary targets of racial harassment in school, issues of ethnic groups, and psycho-environmental concerns that affect the service delivery and practice of today’s school counselor.

 

Citation

LeBeauf, I. (2008). Racial disparities in new millennium schools: Implications for school counselors. Journal of School Counseling, 6(10). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v6n10.pdf

 

Type of Article

Current Issues

 

Volume 6, Number 11:

 

School Counseling in China Today

Timothy C. Thomason, Northern Arizona University, and Xiao Qiong, Xi'an Shiyou University

 

Abstract

This article provides a brief overview of the development of psychological thinking in China and social influences on the practice of school counseling today. Common problems of students are described, including anxiety due to pressure to perform well on exams, loneliness and social discomfort, and video game addiction. Counseling approaches used by school counselors today can include both traditional Chinese treatments like qigong and modern Western approaches like cognitive behavioral therapy. There is a great need for more school counselors, more training for counselors on modern counseling methods, and more efforts to reduce the stigma of seeking counseling. An understanding of how school counseling is practiced in China can increase the cultural awareness and sensitivity of American school counselors.

 

Citation

Thomason, T. C., & Qiong, Xiao (2008). School counseling in China today. Journal of School Counseling, 6(11). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v6n11.pdf

 

Type of Article

Current Issues

 

Volume 6, Number 12:

 

Service Learning Integrated in Urban School Counselor Preparation

Felicia L. Wilczenski and Rebecca A. Schumacher, University of Massachusetts Boston

 

Abstract

School counseling graduate students are preparing for a special relationship with the communities in which they serve, that is, to care for the personal, social, and educational well-being of children and adolescents. School counselor program faculty need to educate instill in their students a sense of their ethical responsibilities to those communities. Service learning can foster an ethic of care. This article describes how future school counselors are prepared through service-learning pre-practicum and practicum with the understandings, skills, and dispositions to support high needs urban secondary students through the complexity of the post-secondary planning process and the transition to a successful university experience.

 

Citation

Wilczenski, F. L., & Schumacher, R. A. (2008). Service learning integrated in urban school counselor preparation. Journal of School Counseling, 6(12). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v6n12.pdf

 

Type of Article

Innovative Methods

 

Volume 6, Number 13:

 

Fostering a Healthy Body Image: Prevention and Intervention With Adolescent Eating Disorders

Michelle Giles and Michael Hass, Chapman University

 

Abstract

Eating disorders are among the most frequently seen chronic illnesses found in adolescent females. In this paper, we discuss school-based prevention and intervention efforts that seek to reduce the impact of this serious illness. School counselors play a key role in the prevention of eating disorders and can provide support even when not directly involved in psychological or medical treatment. Because of their ability to play a leadership role in school-based prevention of eating disorders, school counselors are essential in facilitating a collaborative approach to the prevention of and intervention in eating disorders and their associated risk factors.

 

Citation

Giles, M., & Hass, M. (2008). Fostering a healthy body image: Prevention and intervention with adolescent eating disorders. Journal of School Counseling, 6(13). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v6n13.pdf

 

Type of Article

Innovative Methods

 

Volume 6, Number 14:

 

Preparing Rural Students for Large Colleges and Universities

Douglas A. Guiffrida, University of Rochester

 

Abstract

Results of this review of college student retention research suggest that students from rural communities face additional challenges adjusting to large colleges and universities compared to students from urban and suburban areas. Research that describes the additional challenges faced by rural students while transitioning to large institutions is presented. Implications are provided to assist rural school counselors in helping their students select colleges that meet their needs and prepare for their experiences at large colleges and universities.

 

Citation

Guiffrida, D. A. (2008). Preparing rural students for large colleges and universities. Journal of School Counseling, 6(14). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v6n14.pdf

 

Type of Article

Current Issues

 

Volume 6, Number 15:

 

Utilizing Cognitive Behavioral Interventions To Positively Impact Academic Achievement in Middle School Students

Brett Zyromski, Southern Illinois University Carbondale, and Arline Edwards Joseph, North Carolina State University

 

Abstract

Empirical research suggests a correlation between Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) interventions and increased academic achievement of students in middle schools. An argument was presented for utilizing CBT intervention within the delivery system of comprehensive school counseling programs in middle schools; specifically in individual counseling, small group counseling, and classroom guidance lessons. Practical examples and resources were provided to assist school counselors in implementing CBT interventions to help students control cognitive thought processes and positively impact academic achievement.

 

Citation

Zyromski, B., & Joseph, A. E. (2008). Utilizing cognitive behavioral interventions to positively impact academic achievement in middle school students. Journal of School Counseling, 6(15). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v6n15.pdf

 

Type of Article

Innovative Methods

 

Volume 6, Number 16:

 

A Content Analysis of Pre-Service School Counselors’ Evaluations of an Urban Practicum Experience

Cheryl Holcomb-McCoy and Georgina Johnston, University of Maryland at College Park

 

Abstract

This article examines the evaluations of nine pre-service school counselors who completed a practicum in an inner-city or urban, predominately African American school. A content analysis of the pre-service counselors’ narrative evaluations was studied and six themes emerged: (a) Relationships and Interactions with Urban Students and Educators, (b) Cultural Differences, (c) Urban Schools and Environment, (d) Urban School Counseling Skills, (e) Urban School Counselor’s Role, and (f) Urban Student Issues/Problems. Implications for urban school counselor educators and future research are given.

 

Citation

Holcomb-McCoy, C., & Johnston, G. (2008). A content analysis of pre-service school counselors’ evaluations of an urban practicum experience. Journal of School Counseling, 6(16). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v6n16.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 6, Number 17:

 

Latino High School Students' Perceptions and Preferred Characteristics of High School Counselors

Wendy Eckenrod-Green and John R. Culbreth, The University of North Carolina at Charlotte

 

Abstract

With a trendsetting change in the demographic population of public high school students, school counselors need to be equipped with multicultural competence to better understand the needs of the students they serve, especially Latino students. Semi-structured interviews were conducted to obtain Latino high school students’ perceptions and preferred characteristics of their school counselor. Students' responses indicate that there is a lack of awareness of the role and function of school counselors among Latino students. In addition, students reported the need for a translator and the need for Hispanic school counselors, or, for the school counselor to speak Spanish. Implications for school counselors and counselor educators are provided.

 

Citation

Eckenrod-Green, W., & Culbreth, J. R. (2008). Latino high school students' perceptions and preferred characteristics of high school counselors. Journal of School Counseling, 6(17). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v6n17.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 6, Number 18:

 

Counseling Adolescents for the Death of a Parent: A Literature Review

Eva E. Reed, The Pennsylvania State University

 

Abstract

Adolescents experiencing the death of a parent face additional challenges in navigating the physical, mental, emotional, and social adjustment associated with adolescent development. This review explores the impact of parental death on adolescent development and offers empirical support for counseling interventions. Factors addressed include developmental issues, grief, interventions, implications for research, and suggestions for school counselors and educators.

 

Citation

Reed, E. E. (2008). Counseling adolescents for the death of a parent: A literature review. Journal of School Counseling, 6(18). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v6n18.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 6, Number 19:

 

The Impact of the Supervision Relationship on the Behaviors of School Counseling Interns

Jake J. Protivnak, Youngstown State University, and Thomas E. Davis, Ohio University

 

Abstract

This study investigated the onsite supervision relationship and the behaviors of ninety-seven school counseling interns in a Midwestern state. Results indicated that the supervision relationship was related to the behaviors of school counseling interns. Within the supervision relationship, decreased role ambiguity was found to be a strong predictor of engagement in appropriate school counseling internship behaviors. Findings support the importance of counselor educators, school counseling interns and onsite school counseling supervisors attending to the supervision relationship.

 

Citation

Protivnak, J. J., & Davis, T. E. (2008). The impact of the supervision relationship on the behaviors of school counseling interns. Journal of School Counseling, 6(19). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v6n19.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 6, Number 20:

 

Professional School Counselors as Process Observers in the Classroom: Collaboration with Classroom Teachers

Laura Fazio-Griffith and Jennifer R. Curry, Louisiana State University

 

Abstract

This article defines process observation and how it can be used by professional school counselors to assist classroom teachers in enhancing the learning environment for students. Further, this article elucidates the skills used by process observers. A case illustration is provided to demonstrate application of this service. Finally, practical strategies for implementing this service in the school setting are given as well as implications for counselors and counselor educators.

 

Citation

Fazio-Griffith, L., & Curry, J. R. (2008). Professional school counselors as process observers in the classroom: Collaboration with classroom teachers. Journal of School Counseling, 6(20). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v6n20.pdf

 

Type of Article

Innovative Methods

 

Volume 6, Number 21:

 

Strengthening Links Between the Levels: School Counselor Collaboration for Successful Student Transitions

Andrea L. Dixon, University of Florida, Joyce A. DeVoss, Northern Arizona University, and Eric S. Davis, University of Florida

 

Abstract

This exploratory study focused on the inter-collaboration activities among 112 elementary, middle, and high school counselors that facilitate students’ transitions. Results indicated significant differences in several of the current collaboration activities of the varying levels of school counselors; however, there were no differences found in the school counselors’ beliefs about collaboration activities. Implications for student transition-related collaborative activities among school counselors are presented and implications for future research are considered.

 

Citation

Dixon, A. L., DeVoss, J. A., & Davis, E. S. (2008). Strengthening links between the levels: School counselor collaboration for successful student transitions. Journal of School Counseling, 6(21). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v6n21.pdf

 

Type of Article

Innovative Methods

 

Volume 6, Number 22:

 

Professional Challenges in School Counseling: Organizational, Institutional and Political

Trish Hatch, San Diego State University

 

Abstract

The school counseling profession has struggled throughout history to secure a legitimate integral position in the educational mission of school. The profession is more likely to gain acceptance and be seen as a legitimate profession if we understand three theories that form the foundation of professional legitimacy: Organizational Theory, Institutional Theory, and Political Theory. This article briefly explains each theory, examines the profession through the lens of each theory, discusses how the ASCA National Standards and ASCA National Model were intended to address them, and suggests specific actions that school counseling professionals must take to ensure the profession grows and prospers.

 

Citation

Hatch, T. (2008). Professional challenges in school counseling: Organizational, institutional and political. Journal of School Counseling, 6(22). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v6n22.pdf

 

Type of Article

Professional Development

 

Volume 6, Number 23:

 

School Counselor Development Program (SCDP) for the Treatment of Adolescent Depression and Suicidality: A Pilot Study

A. Jordan Wright and Ben Emmert-Aronson, Teachers College, Columbia University

 

Abstract

The School Counselor Development Program (SCDP) was developed as a continuing education intervention for middle school counselors in the New York City Department of Education, focusing on six mental health issues relevant to their work with students. A pilot study was run with 21 New York City Public School counselors. This paper focuses on one of the six modules, dealing with the depression and suicidality of students. The training consisted of a short didactic portion focusing on skills training, extensive role-play practice, and a concluding discussion. A repeated measures design was used with counselors self-assessing confidence before and after the training. It showed a moderately significant increase in counselors’ confidence in dealing with suicidal students and a significant increase in their confidence in dealing with depressed students. Implications for counselors, limitations of the study, and future research are discussed.

 

Citation

Wright, A. J., & Emmert-Aronson, B. (2008). School counselor development program (SCDP) for the treatment of adolescent depression and suicidality: A pilot study. Journal of School Counseling, 6(23). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v6n23.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory & Research

 

Volume 6, Number 24:

 

Factors Influencing the Decision to Break Confidentiality With Adolescent Students: A Survey of School Counselors

Jeremy R. Sullivan and Michael S. Moyer, University of Texas at San Antonio

 

Abstract

In their work with adolescent students, school counselors often are faced with the ethical dilemma of whether to break confidentiality to report risk-taking and potentially dangerous behaviors to parents. This study reports the results of a national survey asking school counselors to rate the importance of multiple factors that influence their decision to break confidentiality with students. Based on responses from 200 school counselors, exploratory factor analysis was used to categorize these considerations into 4 factors: Dangerousness of the Behavior, Protecting the Student and Relationship, Compliance, and Student Characteristics. Respondents also provided additional considerations that influence their ethical decision-making; these additional considerations point to potential directions for future research.

 

Citation

Sullivan, J. R., & Moyer, M. S. (2008). Factors influencing the decision to break confidentiality with adolescent students: A survey of school counselors. Journal of School Counseling, 6(24). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v6n24.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory & Research

 

Volume 6, Number 25:

 

A School Counselor’s Guide to Reporting Child Abuse and Neglect

April Sikes, Old Dominion University

 

Abstract

The process of reporting abuse can be challenging, traumatic, and at times, overwhelming. In order for school counselors to be effective helpers for children, it is essential that they know how to recognize and prevent child abuse and neglect. The purpose of this article is to provide professional school counselors with information they can use to assist in the identification, reporting, and prevention of child abuse and neglect.

 

Citation

Sikes, A. (2008). A school counselor’s guide to reporting child abuse and neglect. Journal of School Counseling, 6(25). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v6n25.pdf

 

Type of Article

Innovative Methods

 

Volume 6, Number 26:

 

Ideal to Real: Duties Performed by School Counselors

Dilani M. Perera-Diltz, Cleveland State University, and Kimberly L. Mason, University of New Orleans

 

Abstract

School counselors (n = 1,704) nationwide were surveyed to determine if the duties performed by them were aligned with the duties prescribed by the school counseling profession since the inception of the American School Counseling Association (ASCA) National Model in 2003. Differences were found based on participants having received ASCA National Model training, having teaching credentials, and working in states with mandates for school counseling.

 

Citation

Perera-Diltz, D. M., & Mason, K. L. (2008). Ideal to real: Duties performed by school counselors. Journal of School Counseling, 6(26). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v6n26.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory & Research

 

Volume 6, Number 27:

 

Self-Reported Resilient Behaviors of Seventh and Eighth Grade Students Enrolled in an Emotional Intelligence Based Program

Veronica Castro, University of Texas-Pan American, Michael B. Johnson, Georgia Highlands College, and Robert Smith, Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi

 

Abstract

School counselors are in a unique position to help at-risk students. Research indicates that teaching resiliency skills and emotional intelligence is a promising venture (Bernard, 1997; Chavkin & Gonzalez, 2000; Henderson & Milstein, 2002). Seventy identified at-risk seventh and eighth grade students enrolled in the Teen Leadership Program (Flippen Group, 2001) served as the population for this study. Initial analysis of the data did not reveal a difference between treatment and control groups. However, non-parametric tests indicate that the experimental group had a significant difference in office referrals. Findings and recommendations for future research are further elaborated in this study.

 

Citation

Castro, V., Johnson, M. B., & Smith, R. (2008). Self-reported resilient behaviors of seventh and eighth grade students enrolled in an emotional intelligence based program. Journal of School Counseling, 6(27). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v6n27.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory & Research

 

Volume 6, Number 28:

 

Obsessive Compulsive Disorder and the School Counselor

Ellen C. Wertlieb, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine

 

Abstract

The current article is designed to provide school counselors an understanding of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). The causes, characteristics, and treatment approaches are presented with examples focusing on school-related issues. The article concludes with a discussion about the role that the school counselor can take in helping the child with OCD to have a successful school experience.

 

Citation

Wertlieb, E. C. (2008). Obsessive compulsive disorder and the school counselor. Journal of School Counseling, 6(28). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v6n28.pdf

 

Type of Article

Current Issues

 
 

2009

Volume 7, Number 1:

 

Counseling Concerns of Gifted and Talented Adolescents: Implications for School Counselors

Susannah Wood, University of Iowa

 

Abstract

Gifted students may seek school counselors for help with concerns regarding various aspects of their gifted experience. The purpose of this study was to determine which counseling concerns are experienced by gifted students. While underachievement and identity were not reported to be concerns encountered by 153 participants enrolled in a summer residential program, they did report concerns tied to multipotentiality, social acceptance, perfectionism and fear of failure and over half reported they asked for help on some of the reported concerns they experienced. Findings from this study have implications for school counselors working with gifted students in the academic, career and personal/social domains.

 

Citation

Wood, S. (2009). Counseling concerns of gifted and talented adolescents: Implications for school counselors. Journal of School Counseling, 7(1). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v7n1.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 7, Number 2:

 

The Effects of an Empathy Building Program on Bullying Behavior

Stacey Stanbury, Lander Valley High School, Lander, Wyoming, Mary Alice Bruce, University of Wyoming, Sachin Jain, University of Idaho, and John Stellern, University of Wyoming

 

Abstract

This article discusses the development, implementation, and effects of a middle school empathy building program that was designed to reduce bullying behavior. Results show that participants in the intervention group reported engaging in significantly less bullying behavior as compared to the control group, and the program was particularly effective for the female participants.

 

Citation

Stanbury, S., Bruce, M. A., Jain, S., & Stellern, J. (2009). The effects of an empathy building program on bullying behavior. Journal of School Counseling, 7(2). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v7n2.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 7, Number 3:

 

Primary Transitions: How Elementary School Counselors Promote Optimal Transitions

Kelsey Augst, Hilburn Drive Elementary School, Raleigh, North Carolina, and Patrick Akos, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

 

Abstract

Early school transitions provide students with opportunities and challenges that will impact their academic and developmental pathways, but the role that the elementary school counselor can play in these transitions is often overlooked in school counseling literature. The transition into kindergarten and the transition from second to third grade are critical times where school counselors can support students. Practical recommendations, based upon research, for best practices are provided for elementary school counselors in order to support students and families as they transition into kindergarten and across second and third grades.

 

Citation

Augst, K., & Akos, P. (2009). Primary transitions: How elementary school counselors promote optimal transitions. Journal of School Counseling, 7(3). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v7n3.pdf

 

Type of Article

Innovative Methods

 

Volume 7, Number 4:

 

Transforming Internship: The Use of Contracts in School Counselor Education

Donna M. Gibson, University of South Carolina

 

Abstract

Integrating school counseling standards, models, and initiatives can be overwhelming to all individuals striving to conduct comprehensive developmental guidance programs. The research in this area indicates a gap between the school counseling intern's ability to connect their learning of these initiatives to actual practice. This article focuses on an assignment that requires interns to transform their internship experience by using a contract based on school counseling standards to demonstrate best practice in the profession.

 

Citation

Gibson, D. M. (2009). Transforming internship: The use of contracts in school counselor education. Journal of School Counseling, 7(4). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v7n4.pdf

 

Type of Article

Professional Development

 

Volume 7, Number 5:

 

A Solution-Focused Leadership Model: Examining Perceptions of Effective Counselor Leadership

Janet G. Froeschle and Susan Nix, West Texas A&M University

 

Abstract

As school leaders, counselors are in a unique position to form collaborative partnerships with principals and faculty while utilizing techniques that improve morale, school climate, and student development. In this qualitative study, school counselors, teachers, and principals were asked to reflect on counseling leadership styles perceived as effective. Themes emerged suggesting the following leadership paradigms: collaboration between school counselors, principals, and teachers; the implementation of solution- focused techniques; and a need for school counseling program improvements. Recommendations and procedures for implementing a new leadership model, solution- focused leadership, are included as based on this qualitative data.

 

Citation

Froeschle, J. G., & Nix, S. (2009). A solution-focused leadership model: Examining perceptions of effective counselor leadership. Journal of School Counseling, 7(5). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v7n5.pdf

 

Type of Article

Professional Development

 

Volume 7, Number 6:

 

A School Counseling Program’s Accountable Response to Adolescent Self-Mutilation

Julie Thatcher, Tarrell Awe Agahe Portman, and Anna M. Williams-Viviani, University of Iowa

 

Abstract

Self-mutilation is a prevalent concern, particularly for adolescents. School counseling programs can play an important role in the recognition, prevention, and intervention of self-mutilation. This study reviews current literature on adolescent self-mutilation, prevention, and treatment suggestions offered school counseling program personnel. Also included is a brief review of school counseling program accountability literature followed by suggestions for school counseling program implementation of prevention and intervention strategies which incorporate accountability components in order to further the research on school counseling programmatic best practices for adolescent self-mutilation.

 

Citation

Thatcher, J., Portman, T. A. A., & Williams-Viviani, A. M. (2009). A school counseling program’s accountable response to adolescent self-mutilation. Journal of School Counseling, 7(6). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v7n6.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 7, Number 7:

 

Bolstering School Based Support by Comprehensively Addressing the Needs of an Invisible Minority: Implications for Professional School Counselors

Jennifer R. Curry, Louisiana State University, and B. Grant Hayes, University of Central Florida

 

Abstract

The ethical imperative for school counselors to intervene on behalf of marginalized students has been well documented. Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning youth (LGBTQ) have been noted to be at increased risk for school dropout, truancy, lower school achievement, suicidal ideation and attempts, and depression. School counselors are in a unique position to foster the well-being of LGBTQ youth. This manuscript gives concrete strategies for intervening with LGBTQ youth through comprehensive school counseling programming.

 

Citation

Curry, J. R., & Hayes, B. G. (2009). Bolstering school based support by comprehensively addressing the needs of an invisible minority: Implications for professional school counselors. Journal of School Counseling, 7(7). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v7n7.pdf

 

Type of Article

Innovative Methods

 

Volume 7, Number 8:

 

Dispelling Seven Myths Concerning Latina/o Students: A Call to Action for School Counselors

Javier Cavazos Jr., University of Texas-Pan American, Alyssa G. Cavazos, Texas Christian University, and Maria G. Hinojosa and Marcos Silva, University of Texas-Pan American

 

Abstract

Research has illustrated that school counselors do not provide Latina/o students with sufficient information about higher education (Immerwahr, 2003; Zalaquett, 2005), high expectations (Martinez, 2003), and individual counseling and guidance (Vela Gude et al., in press). Because school counselors are supposed to play an important role in helping Latina/o students pursue higher education (Villalba, Akos, Keeter, & Ames, 2007), the current article identifies seven myths concerning a growing Latina/o population: (1) parents do not value education, (2) students do not value education, (3) low expectations do not exist, (4) students are receiving sufficient guidance, (5) perceived ability level is the most important factor in eventual academic achievement, (6) personal barriers are more detrimental than systemic barriers, and (7) students do not have the ability to adopt a futuristic orientation. Hopefully, this article will encourage school counselors to help Latina/o students by providing quality attention and advisement, high expectations, and information about higher education.

 

Citation

Cavazos, J. Jr., Cavazos, A. G., Hinojosa, M. G., & Silva, M. (2009). Dispelling seven myths concerning Latina/o students: A call to action for school counselors. Journal of School Counseling, 7(8). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v7n8.pdf

 

Type of Article

Current Issues

 

Volume 7, Number 9:

 

Dysfunctional Family Structures and Aggression in Children: A Case for School-Based, Systemic Approaches With Violent Students

Charles R. McAdams III and Victoria A. Foster, The College of William & Mary, Kylie Dotson-Blake, East Carolina University, and Johnston M. Brendel, The College of William & Mary

 

Abstract

School counselors may be in the best position to identify troubled students and intervene before an act of school violence occurs. Current education literature challenges school counselors to expand their knowledge of social, environmental and family dynamics and the influences of those dynamics on student violence. This article will (a) introduce the structural elements of a family system (b) describe links between dysfunctional family structure and child aggression, (c) propose school-based strategies for working with students and their families that address the structural antecedents of aggression, and (d) underscore the feasibility and benefits of a systemic approach to violent students.

 

Citation

McAdams, C. R., III, Foster, V. A., Dotson-Blake, K., & Brendel, J. M. (2009). Dysfunctional family structures and aggression in children: A case for school-based, systemic approaches with violent students. Journal of School Counseling, 7(9). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v7n9.pdf

 

Type of Article

Innovative Methods

 

Volume 7, Number 10:

 

Wellness-Based Group Counseling With Elementary Students in Disciplinary Alternative Education Programs

Michelle Perepiczka, Texas A&M University-Commerce

 

Abstract

Students in Disciplinary Alternative Education Programs (DAEPs) have a variety of behavior problems. School counselors in DAEPs have the opportunity to address emotional, academic, social, and behavioral concerns of these students. Counselors may use the strengths-based wellness paradigm as an alternative method of addressing students’ holistic needs while striving to follow the American School Counselor Association’s (2005) National Model. This article describes how to incorporate a 6 week wellness group counseling intervention into DAEPs with elementary students.

 

Citation

Perepiczka, M. (2009). Wellness-based group counseling with elementary students in disciplinary alternative education programs. Journal of School Counseling, 7(10). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v7n10.pdf

 

Type of Article

Innovative Methods

 

Volume 7, Number 11:

 

Duty to Warn and Protect Against Self-Destructive Behaviors and Interpersonal Violence

Danica G. Hays, Laurie M. Craigen, Jasmine Knight, Amanda Healey, and April Sikes, Old Dominion University

 

Abstract

Professional school counselors are likely to work with students who are experiencing mental health issues including self-injury, eating disorders, depression and suicidality, as well as those associated with dating violence and bullying. This paper discusses two key areas school counselors are encouraged to reflect upon in determining if there is a duty to warn and protect in these instances. Implications for school counselor practice are provided.

 

Citation

Hays, D. G., Craigen, L. M., Knight, J., Healey, A., & Sikes, A. (2009). Duty to warn and protect against self-destructive behaviors and interpersonal violence. Journal of School Counseling, 7(11). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v7n11.pdf

 

Type of Article

Current Issues

 

Volume 7, Number 12:

 

Examining Hispanic Counseling Students’ Worries: A Qualitative Approach

Javier Cavazos Jr., Victor I. Alvarado, Iliana Rodriguez, and John Robert Iruegas, University of Texas-Pan American

 

Abstract

This study examined the worries and concerns of 24 Hispanic counselors-in training. The four most reported worries were training and preparedness, non-counseling duties, finding a school counseling position, and effectiveness. Results indicate that although Hispanic counselors-in training are concerned about their effectiveness and competence as school counselors, they are also concerned about placement in a position that involves non-counseling (e.g., paperwork) duties. This study provides evidence for the continued need of advocacy for the school counseling profession.

 

Citation

Cavazos, J., Jr., Alvarado, V. I., Rodriguez, I., & Iruegas, J. R. (2009). Examining Hispanic counseling students’ worries: A qualitative approach. Journal of School Counseling, 7(12). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v7n12.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 7, Number 13:

 

Identifying Exemplary School Counseling Practices in Nationally Recognized High Schools

Matthew Militello, North Carolina State, Raleigh, John Carey and Carey Dimmitt, University of Massachusetts at Amherst, Vivian Lee, College Board, and Jason Schweid, University of Massachusetts at Amherst

 

Abstract

The National Center for School Counseling Outcome Research (CSCOR) at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst studied exemplary practices of 18 high schools that received recognition for college preparation and placement in 2004 and 2005. Through interviews with key personnel at each of the high schools, the researchers generated a set of ten domains that characterize the work of the school counselor that seem to be related to improved student enrollment in post-secondary institutions.

 

Citation

Militello, M., Carey, J., Dimmitt, C., Lee, V., & Schweid, J. (2009). Identifying exemplary school counseling practices in nationally recognized high schools. Journal of School Counseling, 7(13). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v7n13.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 7, Number 14:

 

Making the Invisible Visible: School Counselors Empowering Students With Disabilities Through Self-Advocacy Training

Trish Hatch, T. Shelton, and Gerald Monk, San Diego State University

 

Abstract

Professional School Counselors (PSCs) are trained to be leaders in school reform, collaborators with other educators, and advocates for all students. While PSCs provide academic, career, and personal/social interventions for the student body as part of a comprehensive school counseling program the needs of students with disabilities are often excluded. This article demonstrates replicable strategies for including students with special needs in a comprehensive school counseling program. The school counseling graduate participants focused on students with high-incidence disabilities in a diverse, urban high school in San Diego, California.

 

Citation

Hatch, T., Shelton, T., & Monk, G. (2009). Making the invisible visible: School counselors empowering students with disabilities through self-advocacy training. Journal of School Counseling, 7(14). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v7n14.pdf

 

Type of Article

Innovative Methods

 

Volume 7, Number 15:

 

Placement of Twins and Multiples in the Classroom: A Brief Survey of School Counselors’ Knowledge and Attitudes

Johanna Nilsson, University of Missouri-Kansas City, Lynn Leonard, Shawnee Mission West High School, Overland Park, Kansas, Danah Barazanji, University of Missouri-Kansas City, Rachel Simone, Gillis Center, Kansas City, Missouri

 

Abstract

This study investigated 65 school counselors’ perception of classroom placement of twins and multiples. The results showed that most of the participants had twins and multiples in their schools, but that they were neither aware of their school district nor building´s policy regarding placement. Most participants supported early separation, already at preschool or kindergarten, and believed that separation would have a positive impact on the children’s development. However, over 70% reported having no training on issues associated with twins and multiples in school system. Implications for research and practice are addressed.

 

Citation

Nilsson, J., Leonard, L., Barazanji, D., & Simone, R. (2009). Placement of twins and multiples in the classroom: A brief survey of school counselors’ knowledge and attitudes. Journal of School Counseling, 7(15). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v7n15.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 7, Number 16:

 

Professional Development Schools: A Model for Preparing School Counselor Trainees

Michael Brooks, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Sam Steen, George Washington University,Franklyn Williams, University of Central Florida

 

Abstract

This article discusses a training model, based on The Education Trust, The American School Counselor Association, and The Holmes Partnership, consisting of school counselor trainees completing their clinical experiences in a Professional Development School. A case study demonstrating the role of the school counselor is presented along with implications for counselor educators.

 

Citation

Brooks, M., Steen, S., & Williams, F. (2009). Professional development schools: A model for preparing school counselor trainees. Journal of School Counseling, 7(16). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v7n16.pdf

 

Type of Article

Professional Development

 

Volume 7, Number 17:

 

Post-Training Needs of Urban High School Counselors: Implications for Counselor Training Programs

Delila Owens, Francesca Pernice-Duca, and Diana Thomas, Wayne State University

 

Abstract

In this study, the post-training needs of urban high school counselors were explored. A total of 55 high school counselors completed a questionnaire. The counselors emphasized the necessity of supplemental training for properly conducting youth drop-out and violence prevention programs, effective services for underachieving students who consistently earn low-to-failing grades, and needs assessments analysis. Implications for counselor education training programs are discussed.

 

Citation

Owens, D., Pernice-Duca, F., & Thomas, D. (2009). Post-training needs of urban high school counselors: Implications for counselor training programs. Journal of School Counseling, 7(17). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v7n17.pdf

 

Type of Article

Professional Development

 

Volume 7, Number 18:

 

School Counselors’ Role in Dating Violence Intervention

Laurie M. Craigen, April Sikes, Amanda Healey, and Danica Hays, Old Dominion University

 

Abstract

Dating violence among adolescents is a major public health concern. The purpose of this paper is to examine five factors of which school counselors must be aware in order to recognize, intervene, and report incidence of dating violence. These factors are (a) understanding the diverse definitions of dating violence, (b) recognizing dating violence indicators, (c) having knowledge of the peer influences related to dating violence, (d) understanding the process of the disclosure of dating violence, and (e) various ethical considerations related to dating violence. Also included in this paper are future implications for school counselors.

 

Citation

Craigen, L. M., Sikes, A., Healey, A., & Hays, D. (2009). School counselors’ role in dating violence intervention. Journal of School Counseling, 7(18). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v7n18.pdf

 

Type of Article

Current Issues

 

Volume 7, Number 19:

 

The School Counselor as Grant Writer

Debbie Vernon, Hudson Middle School, Hudson, Ohio, and John S. (Steve) Rainey, Kent State University

 

Abstract

An important role for school counselors is that of advocate for resources. Grant writing is one way in which school counselors can secure financial resources to develop and maintain school counseling programs. An outline of the grant writing process is provided along with strategies for implementation, potential benefits and challenges, followed by a discussion of next steps as school counselors explore the world of grant funding. Recommendations for school counselor education programs are also presented.

 

Citation

Vernon, D., & Rainey, J. S. (2009). The school counselor as grant writer. Journal of School Counseling, 7(19). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v7n19.pdf

 

Type of Article

Professional Development

 

Volume 7, Number 20:

 

School Counselors’ Adoption of Brief Counseling: The Diffusion of an Innovative Practice

John M. Littrell and Laurie Carlson, Colorado State University

 

Abstract

Brief counseling has emerged as an innovation in the field of school counseling. This study examined the factors that promote and impede the adoption of such innovation. Everett Rogers’ diffusion of innovation model provided the framework for the survey examining counselors’ knowledge, application skills, and actual use of brief counseling. The study investigated how counselors’ readiness to adopt innovation, the characteristics of brief counseling, and the counselors’ social networks and activities influenced the adoption of brief counseling. Implications for the professional development and continuing education of professional school counselors are discussed.

 

Citation

Littrell, J. M., & Carlson, L. (2009). School counselors’ adoption of brief counseling: The diffusion of an innovative practice. Journal of School Counseling, 7(20). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v7n20.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 7, Number 21:

 

Characteristics of Students Who Receive School Counseling Services: Implications for Practice and Research

Julia Bryan, The College of William and Mary, Cheryl Moore-Thomas, Loyola College in Maryland, Norma L. Day-Vines, The Virginia Polytechnic Institute, Cheryl Holcomb-McCoy, University of Maryland at College Park, and Natasha Mitchell, Prince George’s County Public Schools

 

Abstract

Data from the National Education Longitudinal Study of 1988-2000 (NELS: 88) were used to examine the characteristics of students who see their school counselor about general, academic, career, and academic issues. Study results indicated that overall, school counselors were more likely to have contact with students who are identified as at-risk for school failure. Implications for future school counseling research are discussed.

 

Citation

Bryan, J., Moore-Thomas, C., Day-Vines, N. L., Holcomb-McCoy, C., & Mitchell, N. (2009). Characteristics of students who receive school counseling services: Implications for practice and research. Journal of School Counseling, 7(21). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v7n21.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 7, Number 22:

 

Using Stakeholders as Career Bridges to Advance Students’ Academic Performance: How Would You Like Your Stake?

David L. Olguin and Jeanmarie Keim, University of New Mexico

 

Abstract

The New Mexico Next Step Plan, a postsecondary career transition plan for grades 8 through 12, aims to enhance relationships between all educational stakeholders: students, parents/caregivers, community, and administrators. These stakeholder relationships are intended to close the achievement gap among all students, in particular, ethnic youth. Professional school counselors need to lead this charge. Qualitative feedback from a survey and a compliance audit demonstrate how the school counseling curriculum can utilize stakeholders in career development activities to promote students’ academic success.

 

Citation

Olguin, D. L., & Keim, J. (2009). Using stakeholders as career bridges to advance students’ academic performance: How would you like your stake? Journal of School Counseling, 7(22). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v7n22.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 7, Number 23:

 

Closing the Obesity Achievement Gap: Evidence-Based Practices That School Counselors Can Help Implement

Rachelle Pérusse, Lukas Kailimang, and Megan Krell, University of Connecticut

 

Abstract

School counselors are charged with helping students in the personal/social, academic, and career development domains. Obesity creates adverse educational outcomes for students along these three domains, suggesting an obesity achievement gap. Thus, school counselors can benefit from knowing which interventions have been shown to be successful in working with students who are overweight. This article presents school counselors with five empirically-based interventions to confront obesity in their schools: Student Media Awareness to Reduce Television (SMART), Dance for Health, Planet Health, Stanford Health Heart Program, and PE4Life. The specific role that school counselors can assume to help implement these interventions is also reviewed.

 

Citation

Pérusse, R., Kailimang, L., & Krell, M. (2009). Closing the obesity achievement gap: Evidence-based practices that school counselors can help implement. Journal of School Counseling, 7(23). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v7n23.pdf

 

Type of Article

Innovative Methods

 

Volume 7, Number 24:

 

Systemic Interventions With Alternative School Students: Engaging the Omega Children

Elizabeth R. O’Brien, University of Tennessee Chattanooga, and Jennifer R. Curry, Louisiana State University

 

Abstract

Alternative school placement continues to be a final option for many students who have experienced ongoing academic and behavioral difficulties. As the majority of these students tend to be at-risk for school failure and truancy, it is critical that during alternative school placement opportunities are afforded to reconnect or engage these youth. This article explores options for increasing multisystemic engagement and support for students in alternative school placements.

 

Citation

O’Brien, E. R., & Curry, J. R. (2009). Systemic interventions With alternative school students: Engaging the omega children. Journal of School Counseling, 7(24). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v7n24.pdf

 

Type of Article

Innovative Methods

 

Volume 7, Number 25:

 

How Service Learning Addresses the Mental Health Needs of Students in Urban Schools

Felicia L. Wilczenski and Amy L. Cook, University of Massachusetts Boston

 

Abstract

Service learning promotes social-emotional and academic development through active engagement in community activities. It empowers students to think beyond themselves and to develop a commitment to serve others. In so doing, service learning builds connections with school and community that are critically important in urban settings. This paper links key components of effective mental health programs in urban schools with service learning.

 

Citation

Wilczenski, F. L., & Cook, A. L. (2009). How service learning addresses the mental health needs of students in urban schools. Journal of School Counseling, 7(25). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v7n25.pdf

 

Type of Article

Current Issues

 

Volume 7, Number 26:

 

Evidence-Based Counseling Interventions With Children of Divorce: Implications for Elementary School Counselors

Marianne E. Connolly, Johns Hopkins University, and Eric J. Green, The Chicago School of Professional Psychology

 

Abstract

Parental divorce has become increasingly common for large numbers of families in schools (Lamden, King, & Goldman, 2002). This article addresses the effects of divorce on children and protective factors supporting their adjustment. Evidence-based interventions for children of divorce in elementary school counseling programs are discussed. School-based consultation, the Children of Divorce Intervention Program, and the Children’s Support Group are three evidence-based practices described. Implications for schools counselors are provided to help integrate research findings and practice.

 

Citation

Connolly, M. E., & Green, E. J. (2009). Evidence-based counseling interventions with children of divorce: Implications for elementary school counselors. Journal of School Counseling, 7(26). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v7n26.pdf

 

Type of Article

Innovative Methods

 

Volume 7, Number 27:

 

Asian Indian Students: Moving Beyond Myths and Adopting Effective Practices

Sejal B. Parikh, University of North Florida

 

Abstract

This article describes the Asian Indian population and how the myth of the model minority can influence students’ access to support services. It is important for school counselors to understand how this minority group experiences stressors related to academics, career decision making, and personal/social development. Effective interventions and strategies for working with Asian Indian students and their families are discussed.

 

Citation

Parikh, S. (2009). Asian Indian students: Moving beyond myths and adopting effective practices. Journal of School Counseling, 7(27). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v7n27.pdf

 

Type of Article

Innovative Methods

 

Volume 7, Number 28:

 

ASCA Ethical Standards and the Relevance of Eastern Ethical Theories

Amy L. Cook, University of Massachusetts Boston, and Rick A. Houser, University of Alabama

 

Abstract

As schools become increasingly diverse through immigration and growth of minority groups, it is important that school counselors incorporate culturally sensitive ethical decision-making in their practice. The use of Western ethical theories in the application of professional codes of ethics provides a specific perspective in ethical decision-making, but may not provide school counselors with a broad cultural perspective. We discuss the use of Eastern theories of ethics (Taoism and Hinduism) and their relevance to the ASCA Ethical Standards for School Counselors to inform school counselors’ work with Asian immigrant students.

 

Citation

Cook, A. L., & Houser, R. A. (2009). ASCA ethical standards and the relevance of Eastern ethical theories. Journal of School Counseling, 7(28). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v7n28.pdf

 

Type of Article

Current Issues

 

Volume 7, Number 29:

 

The Enigma of Bipolar Disorder in Children and Adolescents

Gregory T. Hatchett, Northern Kentucky University

 

Abstract

In the past decade, there has been a proliferation in the number of children and adolescents diagnosed with bipolar disorder. Except in rare cases, the young people who receive this diagnosis do not meet the strict diagnostic criteria for bipolar disorder I or II in the DSM-IV-TR. Many pediatric psychiatrists insist there are important development differences in the manifestation of bipolar disorder in childhood and adolescence. In place of clear-cut episodes of mania/hypomania and depression, they argue that younger people with the disorder experience chronic irritability, aggressive behavior, impulsivity, extremely rapid mood swings, hyperactivity, and severe temper tantrums. Given that many of the young people pose special challenges to the school system, the purpose of this article is to update school counselors on this controversial expansion of the diagnosis and treatment of bipolar disorder among children and adolescents.

 

Citation

Hatchett, G. T. (2009). The enigma of bipolar disorder in children and adolescents. Journal of School Counseling, 7(29). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v7n29.pdf

 

Type of Article

Current Issues

 

Volume 7, Number 30:

 

Effectiveness of School Counselor Supervision With Trainees Utilizing the ASCA Model

Colette Blakely, Lee A. Underwood, and Mark Rehfuss, Regent University

 

Abstract

This study sought to determine if differences existed in the supervision of school counselors in Traditional school counseling programs versus Recognized ASCA Model Programs (RAMP). The findings indicated that there are significant differences between Traditional counseling supervisors and RAMP counseling supervisors across all supervisory activities. In addition, it was found that the school counseling supervisors involved in RAMP had more years of work experience than supervisors in Traditional programs. Implications of these findings for school counseling theory, research and practice are also discussed.

 

Citation

Blakely, C., Underwood, L. A. & Rehfuss, M. (2009). Effectiveness of school counselor supervision with trainees utilizing the ASCA Model. Journal of School Counseling, 7(30). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v7n30.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 7, Number 31:

 

Aligning School Counselors, Comprehensive School Counseling Programs, and the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001

Franciene S. Sabens, Chester High School, Chester, Illinois, and Brett Zyromski, Southern Illinois University Carbondale

 

Abstract

The No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act contains numerous implications for school counselors, but the affects of NCLB on school counselors’ roles and identities has not been thoroughly explored. Further, ways comprehensive school counseling programs and school counselors can thrive while striving to meet the goals of NCLB have been ignored in previous research. Therefore, in this manuscript, the school counseling related facets of NCLB were presented, school counselors’ roles according to the legislation were discussed, and empirically supported school counseling interventions available for meeting the goals of NCLB were highlighted. Implications for practicing school counselors concluded the manuscript.

 

Citation

Sabens, F. S., & Zyromski, B. (2009). Aligning school counselors, comprehensive school counseling programs, and the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001. Journal of School Counseling, 7(31). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v7n31.pdf

 

Type of Article

Innovative Methods

 

Volume 7, Number 32:

 

Support Personnel Accountability Report Card (SPARC): A Measure to Support School Counselor Accountability Efforts

Gail Uellendahl, Diana Stephens, and Lisa Buono, California Lutheran University, and Rolla Lewis, California State University, East Bay

 

Abstract

The need for greater accountability in school counseling practice is widely accepted within the profession. However, there are obstacles to making accountability efforts common practice among all school counselors. The Support Personnel Accountability Report Card (SPARC) is a tool that can be used to encourage and support these efforts. In this study, 146 SPARC participants were surveyed to determine the impact of their participation in the SPARC application process. Results indicate that participation led to an increased use of student outcomes data for program improvement, increased awareness about student support programs among stakeholders, and increased action research activities.

 

Citation

Uellendahl, G., Stephens, D., Buono, L., & Lewis, R. (2009). Support Personnel Accountability Report Card (SPARC): A measure to support school counselor accountability efforts. Journal of School Counseling, 7(32). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v7n32.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 7, Number 33:

 

Emergence of National School Counseling Models: Views From the United States and Turkey

Bengü Ergüner-Tekinalp and Wade Leuwerke, Drake University, and Şerife Terzi, Gazi University

 

Abstract

School counseling in Turkey and the United States has progressed on different historical paths. The two countries also have distinct cultures. This article reviews the historical development of the profession in both countries and specifically examines efforts to develop and implement broad national models based on a comprehensive developmental school counseling (CDSC) program. Challenges impeding further advancement of the profession in both countries are examined. Comparison of cross-cultural challenges will inform and support practitioners in both countries striving to implement national models based on CDSC programs.

 

Citation

Ergüner-Tekinalp, B., Leuwerke, W., & Terzi, Ş. (2009). Emergence of national school counseling models: Views from the United States and Turkey. Journal of School Counseling, 7(33). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v7n33.pdf

 

Type of Article

Professional Development

 

Volume 7, Number 34:

 

Grief Counseling Groups for Adolescents Based on Re-Membering Practices

Stephanie Granados, VITAS Innovative Hospice Care, John Winslade, California State University San Bernardino, and Megan De Witt and Lorraine Hedtke, VITAS Innovative Hospice Care

 

Abstract

Focusing on “re-membering” practices is new to grief counseling. Traditional approaches to grief counseling are guided by the concepts of stages or tasks, usually to move the person toward accepting the reality of loss and to “say goodbye” to their deceased loved one. This alternative approach to grief counseling, driven by social constructionism and the narrative perspective, works to keep dead loved ones close and their voices alive. Here the process of a grief counseling group for students at middle and high school levels based on these principles is outlined along with some preliminary responses from participants.

 

Citation

Granados, S., Winslade, J., De Witt, M., & Hedtke, L. (2009). Grief counseling groups for adolescents based on re-membering practices. Journal of School Counseling, 7(34). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v7n34.pdf

 

Type of Article

Innovative Methods

 

Volume 7, Number 35:

 

Creative Approaches to Serving LGBTQ Youth in Schools

Dennis A. Frank, II, Roosevelt University, and Edward P. Cannon, University of Colorado, Denver

 

Abstract

The psychological, social, and emotional needs of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning youth often go unmet in schools. These students may be “out and proud” or they may be silent and invisible; either way, providing effective services to them creates unique challenges for professional school counselors. Providing direct services in schools may be difficult; therefore, indirect methods may create a more hospitable environment for LGBTQ youth. It is the purpose of this article to offer a better understanding of the complexities that sexual minority youth deal with in schools and to offer school counselors and others working in the school environment creative ways to work with LGBTQ students.

 

Citation

Frank, D. A., II, & Cannon, E. P. (2009). Creative approaches to serving LGBTQ youth in schools. Journal of School Counseling, 7(35). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v7n35.pdf

 

Type of Article

Current Issues

 

Volume 7, Number 36:

 

Confusion, Crisis, and Opportunity: Professional School Counselors’ Role in Responding to Student Mental Health Issues

Cynthia Walley, Hunter College, and Tim Grothaus and Laurie Craigen, Old Dominion University

 

Abstract

With the array of challenges facing today’s youth, school counselors are in a unique position to recognize and respond to the diverse mental health needs of students. After a brief examination of the challenges and some promising responses, this article will consider the use of advocacy, collaboration, and professional development to aid school counselors in utilizing culturally responsive efforts to promote mental health and assist with the amelioration of student mental health concerns.

 

Citation

Walley, C., Grothaus, T., & Craigen, L. (2009). Confusion, crisis, and opportunity: Professional school counselors’ role in responding to student mental health issues. Journal of School Counseling, 7(36). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v7n36.pdf

 

Type of Article

Current Issues

 

Volume 7, Number 37:

 

School Counselors’ Attitudes Towards Providing Services to Students Receiving Section 504 Classroom Accommodations: Implications for School Counselor Educators

Dawn M. Romano and Louis V. Paradise, University of New Orleans, and Eric J. Green, The Chicago School of Professional Psychology

 

Abstract

Questions have arisen regarding counselor’s capabilities in assisting students with special needs (Milsom & Akos, 2003; Studer & Quigney, 2005). This study examined school counselors’ training and attitudes toward providing services to students with learning disabilities who qualified for services only under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act. The results indicated that although counselors strongly support providing services to students with special needs, those who lack educational experience reported feeling unprepared to implement specialized services. These findings suggest that school counselors would benefit from additional training when counseling students with learning disabilities. Implications for school counselor educators are provided.

 

Citation

Romano, D. M., Paradise, L. V., & Green, E. J. (2009). School counselors’ attitudes towards providing services to students receiving Section 504 classroom accommodations: Implications for school counselor educators. Journal of School Counseling, 7(37). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v7n37.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 7, Number 38:

 

Differential Perceptions of Bullying in the Schools: A Comparison of Student, Parent, Teacher, School Counselor, and Principal Reports

Rebecca A. Newgent, Karyl L. Lounsbery, Elizabeth A. Keller, Crystal R. Baker, Timothy A. Cavell, and Erica M. Boughfman, University of Arkansas

 

Abstract

Differential perceptions among students, parents, and school personnel in relation to peer victimization were examined. Data were collected at three time points. Students reported lower overall levels of peer victimization at Time 1 than did parents and lower levels of verbal victimization than did teachers. Students reported victimization declined significantly after the transition to middle school. Implications for prevention and intervention by school counselors are provided.

 

Citation

Newgent, R. A., Lounsbery, K. L., Keller, E. A., Baker, C. R., Cavell, T. A., & Boughfman, E. M. (2009). Differential perceptions of bullying in the schools: A comparison of student, parent, teacher, school counselor, and principal reports. Journal of School Counseling, 7(38). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v7n38.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 7, Number 39:

 

Anger in Middle School: The Solving Problems Together Model

Kimberly R. Hall, Jeri L. Rushing, and Rachel B. Owens, Mississippi State University

 

Abstract

Problem-focused interventions are considered to be one of the most effective group counseling strategies with adolescents. This article describes a problem-focused group counseling model, Solving Problems Together (SPT), with a small group of adolescent African American boys struggling with anger management. Adapted from the teaching philosophy of problem-based learning, SPT provides students with the opportunity to work toward positive solutions for managing their anger, while simultaneously helping them to increase their critical thinking and problem-solving skills. Disciplinary referrals related to anger and violent behavior decreased significantly after completion of the group experience.

 

Citation

Hall, K. R., Rushing, J. L., & Owens, R. B. (2009). Anger in middle school: The solving problems together model. Journal of School Counseling, 7(39). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v7n39.pdf

 

Type of Article

Innovative Methods

 

Volume 7, Number 40:

 

Children of Incarcerated Parents: Implications for School Counselors

Priscilla Petsch and Aaron B. Rochlen, University of Texas at Austin

 

Abstract

The recent increase in prison populations has given rise to an unprecedented number of children in the school system with incarcerated parents. To cope with stressors before, during, or after parents’ incarceration, children can exhibit a range of problematic and maladaptive behaviors. This article explores the negative behaviors these children can exhibit during various stages of their parents’ incarceration and the implications of such behaviors in school and learning environments. In addition, the paper argues for the critical role counselors can have in providing relevant therapeutic interventions, reducing stigma of incarceration in the schools, and integrating community resources.

 

Citation

Petsch, P., & Rochlen, A. B. (2009). Children of incarcerated parents: Implications for school counselors. Journal of School Counseling, 7(40). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v7n40.pdf

 

Type of Article

Current Issues

 

Volume 7, Number 41:

 

Factors Affecting Drug Abuse in Adolescent Females in Rural Communities

Susan L. Renes and Anthony T. Strange, University of Alaska Fairbanks

 

Abstract

This article explores factors influencing adolescent female substance use in rural communities. Self-reported data gathered from females 12 to 15 years of age in two northwestern communities in the United States showed an association among gender identity, peer and parental relationships, and substance use. Aggressive masculinity had the strongest association with substance use while peer attachment and parent attachment offered some protection. Study findings suggest that early adolescent females exhibiting aggressive behavior are at higher risk for substance use. Along with students who have little parent or peer support, this group represents a target for personal/social development programs that could be implemented by school counselors.

 

Citation

Renes, S. L., & Strange, A. T. (2009). Factors affecting drug abuse in adolescent females in rural communities. Journal of School Counseling, 7(41). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v7n41.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 7, Number 42:

 

An Adlerian Alliance Supervisory Model for School Counseling

James M. Devlin, Seattle Pacific University, and Robert L. Smith and Christine A. Ward, Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi

 

Abstract

A theoretical framework is presented describing the integration of the Working Alliance and Adlerian Supervision. An Adlerian Alliance Supervisory Model (AASM) is presented as a supervisory approach that infuses the standards of the American School Counselor Association’s National Model. Components considered being essential parts of the AASM: The Supervisory Working Alliance, Adlerian Supervision, and the ASCA National Model are presented. A case study illustrates the use of the AASM applied within a school counseling setting. Implications for counselor education and supervision and school counseling are provided.

 

Citation

Devlin, J. M., Smith, R. L., & Ward, C. A. (2009). An Adlerian alliance supervisory model for school counseling. Journal of School Counseling, 7(42). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v7n42.pdf

 

Type of Article

Professional Development

 

Volume 7, Number 43:

 

Addressing the Needs of Substance Abusing Adolescents: A Guide for Professional School Counselors

April Sikes, Southern Arkansas University, and Rebekah F. Cole, Rebecca McBride, Angela Fusco, and Justin Lauka, Old Dominion University

 

Abstract

As individuals with multiple needs, substance abusing adolescents may seek the support and assistance of school counselors. The purpose of this article is to provide professional school counselors with information they can use to assist students with substance abuse issues. Specifically, this article examines (a) complexity of addressing substance abuse in schools, (b) recognizing and assessing adolescent substance abuse, (c) adolescent substance abuse prevention and intervention, and (d) collaboration with teachers and community stakeholders.

 

Citation

Sikes, A., Cole, R. F., McBride, R., Fusco, A., & Lauka, J. (2009). Addressing the needs of substance abusing adolescents: A guide for professional school counselors. Journal of School Counseling, 7(43). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v7n43.pdf

 

Type of Article

Current Issues

 
 

2010

Volume 8, Number 1:

 

A Mouse Click Away: Internet Resources for Students in Crisis in Geographically Isolated or Self-Sequestered Communities

Juneau Mahan Gary, Kean University

 

Abstract

The impact, incidence, prevalence, and severity of violence and trauma adversely affect students academically, behaviorally, emotionally, and socially. For students residing in geographically isolated or self-sequestered communities, trauma may be exacerbated when school counselors may be unprepared to respond effectively and timely because prevention and intervention options might be limited. Barriers to preparedness may be related to geographic, financial, cultural, religious, psychological, or linguistic reasons. This paper describes how a free, online repository of pre-screened crisis-specific counseling and guidance resources could be useful in supporting students' resiliency in geographically isolated or self-sequestered communities.

 

Citation

Gary, J. M. (2010). A mouse click away: Internet resources for students in crisis in geographically isolated or self-sequestered communities. Journal of School Counseling, 8(1). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v8n1.pdf

 

Type of Article

Current Issues

 

Volume 8, Number 2:

 

A Phenomenological Study of High School Counselor Advocacy as it Relates to the College Access of Underrepresented Students

Kelly Schaeffer, Washington High School, Pensacola, FL, Patrick Akos, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and Jennifer Barrow, Doctoral Student, North Carolina State University

 

Abstract

Data indicate that minority students, economically disadvantaged students, and first-generation students are underrepresented in four-year colleges. Contemporary models encourage school counselors to act as advocates in their schools while addressing inequities and promoting the college access of underrepresented groups of students. This phenomenological study explored the definition and practice of high school counselor advocacy as it relates specifically to increasing access for students traditionally underrepresented in four-year colleges. Results indicate a priority and value of school counselor advocacy, however participants also emphasize challenges to advocacy that lie in their schools, communities, and even in the school counselors themselves.

 

Citation

Schaeffer, K., Akos, P., & Barrow, J. (2010). A phenomenological study of high school counselor advocacy as it relates to the college access of underrepresented students. Journal of School Counseling, 8(2). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v8n2.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 8, Number 3:

 

Educating Future School Principals Regarding the Role of Professional School Counselors

Nancy M. Bringman, California State University, Bakersfield, Sunny M. Mueller, Walter Stiern Middle School, Bakersfield, California, and Sang Min Lee, Korea University, Seoul, South Korea

 

Abstract

In this study, the effects of an intervention designed to educate future school principals regarding the role of professional school counselors was examined. After a brief face-to-face presentation covering the ASCA National Model, future principals rated scheduling-registration, enforcement of school policies and rules, discipline, and administrative duties as less appropriate, and interpreting student records/test results as a more appropriate school counselor activity. Implications of the findings for school counselors and counselor educators are presented.

 

Citation

Bringman, N. M., Mueller, S. M., & Lee, S. M. (2010). Educating future school principals regarding the role of professional school counselors. Journal of School Counseling, 8(3). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v8n3.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 8, Number 4:

 

Decreasing Elementary School Children’s Disruptive Behaviors: A Review of Four Evidence-Based Programs for School Counselors

Blaire Cholewa, Kean University, and Sondra Smith-Adcock and Ellen Amatea, University of Florida

 

Abstract

Elementary school counselors are often expected to intervene when students are disruptive. This article describes four evidence-based programs that have been shown to be highly effective in changing children’s disruptive behavior. The success of these programs rests on the involvement of both parents and teachers in developing a collaborative approach to managing children’s behavior. These four programs were evaluated in terms of their feasibility of implementation by school counselors and other school personnel, their substantiated effectiveness with diverse populations, and their accessibility and ease of use.

 

Citation

Cholewa, B., Smith-Adcock, S., & Amatea, E. (2010). Decreasing elementary school children’s disruptive behaviors: A review of four evidence-based programs for school counselors. Journal of School Counseling, 8(4). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v8n4.pdf

 

Type of Article

Innovative Methods

 

Volume 8, Number 5:

 

Factors That Influence Pre-Service Administrators’ Views of Appropriate School Counselor Duties

Kimberly L. Mason, University of New Orleans, and Dilani M. Perera-Diltz, Cleveland State University

 

Abstract

This study surveyed pre-service administrative internship students (N = 61) at an urban Midwestern state university to explore factors that influence duties assigned to school counselors at the elementary, middle, and high school levels. Results indicated variation in duties assigned by pre-service administrators based on school building level. Significant relationships were present between duties assigned to school counselors and methods of learning about the duties by pre-administrators, as well as duties assigned and the pre-service administrator’s personal experience with school counseling services. Specifically, all methods of learning and personal experience influenced duties recommended for high school counselors; and field service experience and an inability to pinpoint how learning occurred were influential in duty assignment at the middle school level. Implications for school counselors and counselor educators are provided.

 

Citation

Mason, K. L., & Perera-Diltz, D. M. (2010). Factors that influence pre-service administrators’ views of appropriate school counselor duties. Journal of School Counseling, 8(5). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v8n5.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 8, Number 6:

 

Understanding the Contextual Factors That Influence School Counselors’ Multicultural Diversity Integration Practices

Catherine L. Packer-Williams, Michelle L. Jay, and Kathy M. Evans, University of South Carolina

 

Abstract

This study explores the contextual factors that influence a school counselor’s decision to actively integrate multicultural diversity in his/her work. Through using the Integrating Multicultural Diversity Questionnaire (IMDQ) the effectiveness of multicultural diversity training, the types of multicultural diversity practices that are used with frequency and the challenges experienced and/or anticipated in integrating multicultural diversity practices in educational settings are investigated. Results indicate a significant number of participants do not daily integrate multicultural diversity practices because of a reported lack of skills and support as well as ineffectual pre-service multicultural diversity training.

 

Citation

Packer-Williams, C. L., Jay, M. L., & Evans, K. M. (2010). Understanding the contextual factors that influence school counselors’ multicultural diversity integration practices. Journal of School Counseling, 8(6). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v8n6.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 8, Number 7:

 

The Lifetime Bully: Investigating the Relationship Between Adolescent Bullying and Depression in Early Adulthood

Max Lencl and Julia Matuga, Bowling Green State University

 

Abstract

The current study investigated the relationship between adolescent bullying behaviors and early adulthood depression. 305 education majors were given the Zung (1965) self-rating depression scale and a bullying survey containing four descriptions of bullying behavior ( Victim, Bully, Non-involved, Victim/Bully) from which they were asked to select the one which best described their behavior between grades 7-9. Using ANOVA, significant differences were found between groups: the bully-victims had the highest mean depression score (N=29; 39), then the victims (N=41; 38.8), and lastly the non-involved group (N=233; 34.5). The bully-victims revealed the most severe depression. Implications for school professionals are discussed.

 

Citation

Lencl, M., & Matuga, J. (2010). The lifetime bully: Investigating the relationship between adolescent bullying and depression in early adulthood. Journal of School Counseling, 8(7). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v8n7.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 8, Number 8:

 

A Collaborative Approach to Evaluating Well-Being in the Middle School Setting

Tammy D. Gilligan, Michele Kielty Briggs, A. Renee Staton, and Kenn E. Barron, James Madison University

 

Abstract

The benefits of a strength-based approach to working with children and adolescents are clearly indicated in the literature while Strengths-Based School Counseling embraces the positive development of students and learning environments. An interdisciplinary research team formed a partnership with a middle school community to intentionally investigate school climate, life satisfaction, wellness, and student motivation in order to promote positive development and overall well being of middle school students. Students rated moderate to high levels of satisfaction, perceptions of school climate, and overall wellness. Differences in grade levels were indicated. Implications for interdisciplinary teams, evaluation methods, and recommendations to support student wellness are offered.

 

Citation

Gilligan, T. D., Briggs, M. K., Staton, A. R., & Barron, K. E. (2010). A collaborative approach to evaluating well-being in the middle school setting. Journal of School Counseling, 8(8). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v8n8.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 8, Number 9:

 

School Counselors Connecting the Dots Between Disruptive Classroom Behavior and Youth Self-Concept

Markus P. Bidell, Hunter College of the City University of New York, and Robert E. Deacon, Albuquerque, New Mexico

 

Abstract

Students exhibiting emotional and behavioral problems in the classroom can significantly impact the learning environment and often are referred to school counselors. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between high school students’ self-concept and disruptive classroom behaviors (DCB). High school students (N = 92) exhibiting DCB were compared with non-disruptive students using the Self-Description Questionnaire II to assess self-concept. High school students exhibiting DCB reported significantly lower levels of self-concept compared to their non-disruptive peers. Only non-academic aspects of self-concept were significantly lower in students displaying DCB. Findings are discussed within a broader paradigm shift advocating school counseling interventions based on the ASCA National Model® to support student self-concept and reduce DCB before such behaviors escalate to clinical levels and delinquency.

 

Citation

Bidell, M. P., & Deacon, R. E. (2010). School counselors connecting the dots between disruptive classroom behavior and youth self-concept. Journal of School Counseling, 8(9). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v8n9.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 8, Number 10:

 

Facilitating the High School-to-College Transition for Students With Psychiatric Disabilities: Information and Strategies for School Counselors

Sara M. Fier, Southwest Minnesota State University, and Lynda G. Brzezinski, Winona State University

 

Abstract

The transition from high school to college is challenging for many students. In addition to the typical challenges faced by students starting college, students with previously diagnosed psychiatric disabilities have illness-related challenges to face as they transition to college. This article provides information on the current state of concerns related to psychiatric disabilities among college students, as well as the developmental and transition factors that place college students at risk. Finally, the role of school counselors and ways they can help facilitate the transition to college for students with psychiatric disabilities are outlined.

 

Citation

Fier, S. M., & Brzezinski, L. G. (2010). Facilitating the high school-to-college transition for students with psychiatric disabilities: Information and strategies or school counselors. Journal of School Counseling, 8(10). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v8n10.pdf

 

Type of Article

Current Issues

 

Volume 8, Number 11:

 

The Impact of Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy on Teacher Efficacy and Student Achievement

Jeffrey M. Warren, North Carolina State University

 

Abstract

This literature review explores the potential impact of Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy (REBT) on teacher efficacy and student achievement. Research conducted to date, focusing on increasing teacher efficacy and student achievement, has produced mixed results. Teachers continue to think, emote, and behave in unhelpful ways. REBT appears to provide a supportive framework for increasing teacher efficacy and potentially student achievement. School counselors can play a vital role in the dissemination of REBT through professional development. Research findings and theoretical implications are discussed.

 

Citation

Warren, J. M. (2010). The impact of rational emotive behavior therapy on teacher efficacy and student achievement. Journal of School Counseling, 8(11). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v8n11.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 8, Number 12:

 

Being Mexican: Strengths and Challenges of Mexican-Origin Adolescents

Krista M. Malott, Villanova University

 

Abstract

This article provides outcomes of a qualitative inquiry with 20 adolescents of Mexican origin, all of whom have lived in the United States at least two years. Questions addressed the perceived strengths and challenges related to the participants’ ethnic heritage. Findings indicated the greatest perceived challenge was discrimination. Strengths were identified as pride in one’s heritage and the ability to overcome difficulties and to respond effectively to discrimination. Suggestions for applying findings to school counselor practices are provided.

 

Citation

Malott, K. M. (2010). Being Mexican: Strengths and challenges of Mexican-origin adolescents. Journal of School Counseling, 8(12). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v8n12.pdf

 

Type of Article

Current Issues

 

Volume 8, Number 13:

 

School Counselor Collaboration with Language Interpreters: Results of a National Survey

Tina R. Paone, Monmouth University, Krista M. Malott, Villanova University, and Cleborne Maddux, University of Nevada, Reno

 

Abstract

In an effort to increase knowledge of current school practices with regard to the use of language interpreters, experiences in collaborative work with interpreters were assessed through a national survey. Outcomes indicated a perceived need for more interpreter assistance, with many indicating a need for full-time language services. Bilingual staff members (e.g., secretaries or janitors) were most frequently identified as performing interpreter services. Primary challenges regarding the collaboration included limited interpreter skills or training, interpreter inability to manage emotional session content, and interpreter alteration of counselor commentary or assumption of control of counseling sessions.

 

Citation

Paone, T. R., Malott, K. M., & Maddux, C. (2010). School counselor collaboration with language interpreters: Results of a national survey. Journal of School Counseling, 8(13). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v8n13.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 8, Number 14:

 

An Ethics Challenge for School Counselors

Janet G. Froeschle and Charles Crews, Texas Tech University

 

Abstract

Ethical issues arise more often for school counselors than for those who work in other settings (Remley, 2002). The challenge of working not only with minors but also with other stakeholders including parents, teachers, school administrators, and community members sets the stage for potential legal and ethical dilemmas. Awareness and adherence to ethical codes, therefore, is critical if school counselors are to make appropriate, ethical decisions (Bodenhorn, 2006; Capuzzi, 2002; Glosoff & Pate, 2002). This article enhances school counselors’ knowledge of ethical codes by using actual cases as submitted by school counselors. The issues are presented in a quiz format to further discussion and relate each scenario to particular ethical codes.

 

Citation

Froeschle, J. G., & Crews, C. (2010). An ethics challenge for school counselors. Journal of School Counseling, 8(14). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v8n14.pdf

 

Type of Article

Current Issues

 

Volume 8, Number 15:

 

School Counselors and Principals: Different Perceptions of Relationship, Leadership, and Training

Stephen A. Armstrong, Jane H. MacDonald, and Sandy Stillo, Texas A&M University-Commerce

 

Abstract

This study examined school counselors’ and principals’ perceptions of their relationship and the effectiveness of their respective professional preparation programs. An exploratory factor analysis (n = 615) revealed three salient factors: relationship quality, campus leadership and training satisfaction. Kruskal-Wallis tests revealed statistically significant differences in all three factors across the four groups (elementary counselors and principals, and secondary counselors and principals). Mann Whitney U post hoc tests indicated more statistically significant differences among secondary counselors and principals than elementary. Implications for school counselors and improvements in preparation programs for counselors and principals are included.

 

Citation

Armstrong, S. A., MacDonald, J. H., & Stillo, S. (2010). School counselors and principals: Different perceptions of relationship, leadership, and training. Journal of School Counseling, 8(15). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v8n15.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 8, Number 16:

 

Placement of Twins and Multiples in the Classroom: A Brief Survey of School Counselors’ Knowledge and Attitudes

Johanna Nilsson, University of Missouri-Kansas City, Lynn Leonard, Shawnee Mission West High School, Overland Park, Kansas, Danah Barazanji, University of Missouri-Kansas City, and Rachel Simeone, Gillis Center, Kansas City, Missouri

 

Abstract

This study investigated 65 school counselors’ perception of classroom placement of twins and multiples. The results show that most of the participants had twins and multiples in their schools, but that they were neither aware of their school district nor building’s policy regarding placement. Most participants supported early separation, already at preschool or kindergarten, and believed that separation would have a positive impact on the children’s development. Yet, over 70% reported having no training on issues associated with twins and multiples in the school system. Implications for research and practice are addressed.

 

Citation

Nilsson, J., Leonard, L., Barazanji, D., & Simeone, R. (2010). Placement of twins and multiples in the classroom: A brief survey of school counselors’ knowledge and attitudes. Journal of School Counseling, 8(16). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v8n16.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 8, Number 17:

 

Self-Efficacy and Multicultural Competence of School Counselors

Delila Owens, Wayne State University, Nancy Bodenhorn, Virginia Tech University, and Rhonda M. Bryant, Albany State University

 

Abstract

The study examined the relationship between school counselor self efficacy and perceived multicultural competence self efficacy in a sample of 157 school counselors. Results reveal School Counselor Self-Efficacy (SCSE) cultural acceptance subscale was a statistically significant predictor of all three multicultural competencies (MCC: Terminology, Knowledge, and Awareness) scales. Results also indicate that school counselors’ years of experience was a significant predictor in all three MCC scales (Terminology, Knowledge, and Awareness). Implications of the findings are discussed.

 

Citation

Owens, D., Bodenhorn, N., & Bryant, R. M. (2010). Self-efficacy and multicultural competence of school counselors. Journal of School Counseling, 8(17). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v8n17.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 8, Number 18:

 

The Personal is Political: School Counselors’ Use of Self in Social Justice Advocacy Work

Eleanor H. McMahan, Anneliese A. Singh, Alessandra Urbano, and Meg Haston, The University of Georgia

 

Abstract

This qualitative study explored the aspects of “self” school counselors (N = 16) described as central to advocating for social justice in their school systems. Using grounded theory, this study explored racial, feminist, and advocacy identity development in relation to the personhood of the counselor, and how these elements coalesced around action for social change. Implications for school counselor advocacy, training, and research are discussed.

 

Citation

McMahan, E. H., Singh, A. A., Urbano, A., & Haston, M. (2010). The personal is political: School counselors’ use of self in social justice advocacy work. Journal of School Counseling, 8(18). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v8n18.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 8, Number 19:

 

Reducing Test Anxiety Among Third Grade Students Through the Implementation of Relaxation Techniques

Heidi A. Larson, Mera K. El Ramahi, Steven R. Conn, Lincoln A. Estes, and Amanda B. Ghibellini, Eastern Illinois University

 

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to reduce the negative effects that self-perceived levels of test anxiety have on third-grade students. The participants in this study consisted of 177 third-grade students at two Midwestern public elementary schools. Students at one school were taught relaxation techniques, while students at the second school served as the control group, receiving no training. The Westside test anxiety scale (Driscoll 2007), elevator breathing and guided relaxation were utilized to measure and manage levels of anxiety. The results indicated that the relaxation intervention had a significant effect in reducing test anxiety in the experimental group. In contrast, no significant decrease in test anxiety was found among the control group. This study highlights the implications for counselors, parents and teachers working with elementary students facing high-stakes testing.

 

Citation

Larson, H. A., El Ramahi, M. K., Conn, S. R., Estes, L. A., & Ghibellini, A. B. (2010). Reducing test anxiety among third grade students through the implementation of relaxation techniques. Journal of School Counseling, 8(19). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v8n19.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 8, Number 20:

 

Measuring Ethical Sensitivity to Racial and Gender Intolerance in Schools

Edward P. Cannon, University of Colorado Denver

 

Abstract

Professional school counselors must increasingly be prepared to work in more racially and ethnically diverse school settings. At the same time, most school counselor trainees continue to be from the dominant culture, raising the likelihood of culture clashes and ethical violations. This article describes the use of a computer version of a measure of ethical sensitivity to racial and gender intolerance, the Racial Ethical Sensitivity Test – Compact Disk (REST-CD; Sirin, Brabeck, Satiani, & Rogers-Serin, 2003) with school counselor interns. A study of 54 school counselor interns showed that courses in professional ethics and multicultural issues were positively related to scores on the REST-CD. Implications for training and directions for future research are discussed.

 

Citation

Cannon, E. P. (2010). Measuring ethical sensitivity to racial and gender intolerance in schools. Journal of School Counseling, 8(20). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v8n20.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 8, Number 21:

 

Experiences of School Counselors During and After Making Suspected Child Abuse Reports

April Sikes, Southern Arkansas University, and Theodore P. Remley Jr. and Danica G. Hays, Old Dominion University

 

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to explore the experiences of school counselors during and after making suspected child abuse and neglect reports. A total of 847 school counselors who were members of the American School Counselor Association (ASCA) participated in this study. Results showed that professional school counselors encountered some interpersonal and intrapersonal negative experiences during and after making reports of suspected child abuse. Implications for school counselors and future research are provided.

 

Citation

Sikes, A., Remley, T., Jr., & Hays, D. G. (2010). Experiences of school counselors during and after making suspected child abuse reports. Journal of School Counseling, 8(21). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v8n21.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 8, Number 22:

 

Are You a Legally Literate School Counselor?

Kimberly R. Hall and Jeri L. Rushing, Mississippi State University, and Andrew V. Beale, Virginia Commonwealth University

 

Abstract

This exercise is designed to assist school counselors in assessing their knowledge of prevalent ethical and legal issues within the school setting. The aim is to highlight emerging legal and ethical dilemmas and motivate counselors to stay abreast of specific school rules and policies, as well as keep a basic understanding of state and federal laws affecting their work.

 

Citation

Hall, K. R., Rushing, J. L., & Beale, A. V. (2010). Are you a legally literate school counselor? Journal of School Counseling, 8(22). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v8n22.pdf

 

Type of Article

Current Issues

 

Volume 8, Number 23:

 

Half of the Equation: Social Interest and Self-efficacy Levels Among High School Volunteer Peer Mentors vs. Their Nonmentor Peers

Courtney Brewer, Walden University, and James Carroll, Central Michigan University

 

Abstract

School-based mentoring programs which utilize peer mentors have become a popular and cost-effective way of providing support services to students. While several studies examining mentee outcomes appeared in the past decade, less research has examined characteristics of the high school mentors involved. This study examined social interest, social self-efficacy, and general self-efficacy levels of high school volunteer mentors and their nonmentor peers, along with the effects of gender, prior mentoring experience, and experience as a mentee. Findings suggest higher levels of social self-efficacy, higher numbers of female volunteers, and higher rates of former mentees among mentor populations.

 

Citation

Brewer, C., & Carroll, J. (2010). Half of the equation: Social interest and self-efficacy levels among high school volunteer peer mentors vs. their nonmentor peers. Journal of School Counseling, 8(23). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v8n23.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 8, Number 24:

 

A Personal Journey in Promoting Social Justice as a School Counselor: An Action Research Approach

Angel Riddick Dowden, North Carolina State University

 

Abstract

This article describes the author’s journey as a school counselor utilizing an action research approach to advocate for social justice in education. Two case studies are provided to discuss the process utilized to advocate for equal education for all students as a school counselor. Lastly, the author reflects on the successes and failures experienced during the process, and provides pertinent information for school counselors who seek to infuse action research and social justice into the work they currently do.

 

Citation

Dowden, A. R. (2010). A personal journey in promoting social justice as a school counselor: An action research approach. Journal of School Counseling, 8(24). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v8n24.pdf

 

Type of Article

Current Issues

 

Volume 8, Number 25:

 

Does Holding a Teacher Education Degree Make a Difference in School Counselors’ Job Performance?

David M. Stein and Scott DeBerard, Utah State University

 

Abstract

An important hiring criterion maintained by some school districts is that school counselors possess a teaching certificate and prior teaching experience. The present study examined the actual job performance of novice school counselor (interns) in relation to whether they had teacher certification and at least two years of teaching experience, or entered the school counseling profession as non-teachers. Results showed that standardized supervisors’ evaluations of counselor interns’ performance in four main skill areas (Professional Behavior, Clinical Skills, Teaching Skills, Hireability) were not associated with prior teacher training and/or experience. However, male, novice counselors were rated somewhat lower on the domain of Professional Behavior than female counselors. The methodological advantages of studying the teacher-counselor question using novice counselors and expert supervisor-evaluators are discussed. The implications for graduate program training, and hiring practices are summarized.

 

Citation

Stein, D. M., & DeBerard, S. (2010). Does holding a teacher education degree make a difference in school counselors’ job performance? Journal of School Counseling, 8(25). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v8n25.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 8, Number 26:

 

School Counselors’ Experiential Training in Group Work

Samuel K. Bore, Stephen A. Armstrong, and Ashley Womack, Texas A&M University-Commerce

 

Abstract

School counselors’ perceptions of the efficacy and satisfaction of their experiential training in group work were investigated. An exploratory factor analysis (n = 304) revealed four salient factors: leader characteristics, leader responsibilities, child/adolescent group leadership and adult group leadership. A majority of participants indicated they were not satisfied with their experiential training and supervision in group work. A multiple regression analysis showed a statistically significant relationship between experiential training and utilization of psycho-educational groups in schools. Implications for school counselor preparation programs are discussed.

 

Citation

Bore, S. K., Armstrong, S. A., & Womack, A. (2010). School counselors’ experiential training in group work. Journal of School Counseling, 8(26). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v8n26.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 8, Number 27:

 

Meeting the Challenges Together: School Counselors Collaborating With Students and Families With Low Income

Tim Grothaus and Rebekah Cole, Old Dominion University

 

Abstract

Given the disproportionally dire educational outcome data for students from families with low income, school counselors are challenged to advocate, educate, and collaborate with stakeholders to address the pernicious and prevalent achievement and access gaps. After an examination of the inequitable current conditions for these students and families, school counselor facilitation of school-family partnerships is explored. In addition, school counselor roles in challenging biases, educating stakeholders, and engaging in advocacy for these students and families are discussed.

 

Citation

Grothaus, T., & Cole, R. (2010). Meeting the challenges together: School counselors collaborating with students and families with low income. Journal of School Counseling, 8(27). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v8n27.pdf

 

Type of Article

Current Issues

 

Volume 8, Number 28:

 

Counseling Group Curriculum for Parents on Bullying

John Lamanna, M. Ann Shillingford, Mary-Frances Parrish, and Rebecca Sheffield, College of William and Mary

 

Abstract

This article discusses the impact of bullying on K-12 students and the importance of collaborative partnerships between home and school in decreasing the dramatic effects of student bullying behaviors. The authors present a six-week, research-based, small group curriculum specifically developed for professional school counselors to support parents of middle school children who have been bullied.

 

Citation

Lamanna, J., Shillingford, M. A., Parrish, M., & Sheffield, R. (2010). Counseling group curriculum for parents on bullying. Journal of School Counseling, 8(28). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v8n28.pdf

 

Type of Article

Innovative Methods

 

Volume 8, Number 29:

 

Accountability in Action: Service-Learning Partnerships in Practice

Kylie P. Dotson-Blake, L. Kaye Dotson, J. Scott Glass, and Brett D. Lilley, East Carolina University

 

Abstract

This article begins with an exploration of the issues facing beginning school counselors and the educational requirements for school counselor education programs. Following this exploration, the discussion moves into a description of how service-learning can be used to foster understanding and transfer abstract professional concepts into practice. A case example of a class incorporating service-learning is presented, providing counselor educators with an in-depth understanding of the key foundational underpinnings necessary for effective service-learning projects in school counseling coursework. Potential challenges are discussed and suggestions for future research are shared.

 

Citation

Dotson-Blake, K. P., Dotson, L. K., Glass, J. S., & Lilley, B. D. (2010). Accountability in action: Service-learning partnerships in practice. Journal of School Counseling, 8(29). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v8n29.pdf

 

Type of Article

Innovative Methods

 

Volume 8, Number 30:

 

Clinical Preparation and Supervision of Professional School Counselors

Jill M. Thompson and Noran L. Moffett, Clark Atlanta University

 

Abstract

The need for a discussion of school counselor preparation and supervision is supported by the guidelines established by both the Council for the Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP), 2009 and the American School Counselor Association (ASCA), 2005. The significance of this article is to provide a reflective narrative based upon actual practices designed to prepare candidates to meet the rigor and relevance required by both accreditation boards and professional organizations. In addition, a clinical preparation and supervision model will be presented. Stages of developmental supervision, clinical supervision experience, and modalities of clinical supervision are discussed.

 

Citation

Thompson, J. M., & Moffett, N. L. (2010). Clinical preparation and supervision of professional school counselors. Journal of School Counseling, 8(30). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v8n30.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 8, Number 31:

 

The Evolving Identity of School Counselors as Defined by the Stakeholders

Gerra Perkins, Northwestern State University, and Jeffrey Oescher and Mary B. Ballard, Southeastern Louisiana University

 

Abstract

To better understand the evolving identity of school counselors, this article examines the value stakeholders place on the roles of elementary school counselors. The School Counselor Role Survey (SCRS) was administered to assess stakeholders’ perceptions of the importance of the school counselor roles advocated by The Education Trust and the American School Counselor Association (ASCA). The survey combined the three content areas of the ASCA National Standards and the five domains of The Education Trust’s Transforming School Counseling Initiative (TSCI). Results found that all stakeholder groups perceived the most important role of an elementary school counselor is to be that of a mental health professional.

 

Citation

Perkins, G., Oescher, J., & Ballard, M. B. (2010). The evolving identity of school counselors as defined by the stakeholders. Journal of School Counseling, 8(31). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v8n31.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 8, Number 32:

 

A Qualitative Investigation of the Referral Process From School Counselors to Mental Health Providers

Matthew E. Lemberger, University of Missouri – St. Louis, Carrie A. Wachter Morris, Purdue University, Elysia V. Clemens, The University of Northern Colorado, and Allison L. Smith, Antioch University New England

 

Abstract

This qualitative study explores the referral process to mental health providers by school counselors, as perceived by school counselors. Using an open-ended survey instrument, school counselors were asked to describe the referral process, including prevalence, decisional factors, follow-up, and evaluation. Results suggest that school counselors value mental health providers, engage in collaborative relationships, and utilize these relationships throughout referral situations, but that communication and teaming between these two sets of professionals may be lacking after the referral is made. Implications for mental health professionals and school counselors and recommendations for best practices are presented.

 

Citation

Lemberger, M. E., Morris, C. A. W., Clemens, E. V., & Smith, A. L. (2010). A qualitative investigation of the referral process from school counselors to mental health providers. Journal of School Counseling, 8(32). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v8n32.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 8, Number 33:

 

Prepared for School Violence: School Counselors’ Perceptions of Preparedness for Responding to Acts of School Violence

Rebecca Anne Chambers, High Ridge, Missouri, Brett Zyromski, Northern Kentucky University, and Kimberly K. Asner-Self and Muthoni Kimemia, Southern Illinois University Carbondale

 

Abstract

Analyses of 103 St. Louis metro area school counselors’ using the National School Violence Survey (Astor et al., 1997; Astor et al., 2000; Furlong et al., 1996) suggests school counselors’ perceptions of school violence and their preparedness to respond to said violence vary by both community setting and years of experience. Discussion frames the findings within the American School Counseling Association's National Standards, includes suggestions for school counselors to prepare for acts of school violence and concludes with implications for school counselor training.

 

Citation

Chambers, R. A., Zyromski, B., Asner-Self, K. K., & Kimemia, M. (2010). Prepared for school violence: School counselors’ perceptions of preparedness for responding to acts of school violence. Journal of School Counseling, 8(33). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v8n33.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 8, Number 34:

 

School Counselor Perceptions and Attitudes About Collaboration

Melinda M. Gibbons, Joel F. Diambra, and Deborah K. Buchanan, University of Tennessee

 

Abstract

The American School Counselor Association’s increased focus on collaboration in the schools indicates the importance of this activity. School counselors are charged with constructing collaborative relationships with stakeholders focused on academic success for all students. This study explores K-12 school counselors’ perceptions and attitudes about collaboration in one southeastern state through survey research methods. Results show that school counselors collaborate regularly and with various stakeholders. School counselors indicated the terms needed, preferred and valuable most strongly expressed their attitudes toward collaboration. Implications for practice and future research are discussed.

 

Citation

Gibbons, M. M., Diambra, J. F., & Buchanan, D. K. (2010). School counselor perceptions and attitudes about collaboration. Journal of School Counseling, 8(34). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v8n34.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 8, Number 35:

 

Relationship of Friends, Physical Education, and State Test Scores: Implications for School Counselors

Mary Ann Hollingsworth, University of West Alabama

 

Abstract

This study examined the relationship between dimensions of wellness and academic performance for 634 third through fifth grade students in Title One schools in rural Mississippi, using composites of the Five Factor Wellness Inventory for Elementary Children and Reading, Language, and Math Scores of the Mississippi Curriculum Test (a state level measure of content mastery). Results supported significant correlations between performance on all three academic tests and scores on social, physical, and coping wellness composites. Implications are discussed for school counselors with support of practical wellness applications with elementary students and needs for further research.

 

Citation

Hollingsworth, M. A. (2010). Relationship of friends, physical education, and state test scores: Implications for school counselors. Journal of School Counseling, 8(35). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v8n35.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 8, Number 36:

 

Becoming Partners: A School-Based Group Intervention for Families of Young Children Who Are Disruptive

Ellen S. Amatea, Isabel A. Thompson, Lisa Rankin-Clemons, and Maritza L. Ettinger, University of Florida

 

Abstract

A multiple family discussion group program was implemented and evaluated by school counselors working with families of young children referred by their teachers for aggression and attention problems. The logic guiding construction of the program and the program’s unique aspects are described. Outcome data revealed that the program was effective in reducing the children’s hyperactive, defiant, and aggressive behavior and improving the parents’ management skills. The advantages of school counselors conducting this program are discussed.

 

Citation

Amatea, E. S., Thompson, I. A., Rankin-Clemons, L., & Ettinger, M. L. (2010). Becoming partners: A school-based group intervention for families of young children who are disruptive Journal of School Counseling, 8(36). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v8n36.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 8, Number 37:

 

Understanding Non-Suicidal Self-Injury: Perceptions of School Counselors

Chris Simpson, Stephen A. Armstrong, Lisa Couch, and Samuel K. Bore, Texas A&M University-Commerce

 

Abstract

This national exploratory study examined the perceptions of secondary school counselors’ (n = 81) understanding of non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI). Two one-way ANOVAs revealed no statistically significant differences between middle and high school counselors on their perceptions of the prevalence of NSSI. Descriptive analyses revealed that a majority of participants lacked confidence in providing information about NSSI to school personnel. Recommendations for school counselors are provided.

 

Citation

Simpson, C., Armstrong, S. A., Couch, L. & Bore, S. K. (2010). Understanding non-suicidal self-injury: Perceptions of school counselors. Journal of School Counseling, 8(37). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v8n37.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 8, Number 38:

 

Accountability Through Documentation: What Are Best Practices for School Counselors?

Joseph D. Wehrman, Rhonda Williams, and Julaine Field, University of Colorado at Colorado Springs, and Shanna Dahl Schroeder, Osseo School District 279

 

Abstract

This article provides an analysis of important considerations for documentation for school counselors. Although the American School Counseling Association (ASCA) does not provide a national protocol for documentation of school counseling services, the ASCA Ethical guidelines provide insight into ethical record keeping which protects student confidentiality and aids school counselors in organizing contact data for reporting purposes. This article outlines the various regulatory mandates for student records as well as best practices for school counselors for organizing, maintaining, and destroying counseling records. The relationship between effective record keeping and school counselor accountability is also discussed.

 

Citation

Wehrman, J. D., Williams, R., Field, J., & Schroeder, S. D. (2010). Accountability through documentation: What are best practices for school counselors? Journal of School Counseling, 8(38). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v8n38.pdf

 

Type of Article

Current Issues

 

Volume 8, Number 39:

 

Fostering Healthy Development Among Middle School Females: A Summer Program

Mary Caton, Butler Junior High School, Julaine E. Field, University of Colorado at Colorado Springs, and Jered B. Kolbert, Slippery Rock University of Pennsylvania

 

Abstract

This study seeks to understand the effectiveness of a five-day residential leadership camp on the body image, assertiveness skills, attitudes towards gender equality, conflict resolution skills of early adolescent girl participants. To investigate the significance of the intervention, camp participants were asked to complete several instruments including the Adolescent Femininity Ideology Scale Parts 1 and 2 (Tolman & Porche, 2000), the Attitudes Toward Women Scale for Adolescents (Galambos, Peterson, Richards, & Gitelson, 1985), the Body Appreciation Scale (Avalos, Tylka, & Wood-Barcalow, 2005), and the Conflict Resolution Scale (Smith, Daunic, Miller, & Robinson, 2002). These instruments were given in a pretest/posttest format and were analyzed for significance through a repeated measures MANOVA test. Statistical significance was found for every scale but the conflict resolution style subscale of the Conflict Resolution Scale (Smith et al., 2002). Specific implications for school counselors are discussed.

 

Citation

Caton, M., Field, J. E., & Kolbert, J. B. (2010). Fostering healthy development among middle school females: A summer program. Journal of School Counseling, 8(39). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v8n39.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 8, Number 40:

 

Post-Secondary Transition Model for Students With Disabilities

Kim Naugle and Thomas Aaron Campbell, Eastern Kentucky University, and Neal D. Gray, Lenoir-Rhyne University

 

Abstract

This article provides suggestions and strategies for school counselors assisting students with disabilities transitioning into post-secondary settings. Topics include: legislation regarding transition services; resources and suggestions for successful transitions to post-secondary environments (academic and vocational); and advocacy and ableism. A model of four cornerstones of effective transition planning and recommendations for school counselor education programs are offered for consideration as well as a summary and suggestions concerning ways school counselors can provide effective transition services.

 

Citation

Naugle, K., Campbell, T. A., & Gray, N. D. (2010). Post-secondary transition model for students with disabilities. Journal of School Counseling, 8(40). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v8n40.pdf

 

Type of Article

Innovative Methods

 

Volume 8, Number 41:

 

Group Work With English as Second Language (ESL) Students: Integrating Academic and Behavior Considerations

Qi Shi and Sam Steen, George Washington University

 

Abstract

A group counseling intervention with beginning-level ESL students in middle school is presented. Findings from the pre- and post-group evaluations showed statistically significant improvement in students’ reading and writing skills and appropriate classroom behaviors. Limitations of the research design are discussed and implications for school counselors serving ESL students in small groups are provided.

 

Citation

Shi, Q., & Steen, S. (2010). Group work with English as Second Language (ESL) students: Integrating academic and behavior considerations. Journal of School Counseling, 8(41). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v8n41.pdf

 

Type of Article

Innovative Methods