Journal of School Counseling

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2018

 

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The articles published in JSC are indexed in ERIC (Education Resources Information Center).

 

2018

Volume 16, Number 1:

 

A New Typology: Four Perspectives of School Counselor Involvement with Families

Shannon McCarthy and Dayna Watson, University of Alabama at Birmingham

 

Abstract

School counselors are called to collaborate with families to support student success and achievement. Although the need for collaboration is apparent in the ASCA National Model as well as research on family-school engagement, an organized view of what this collaboration between school counselors and families may look like and how existing or proposed approaches to collaboration impact school counselor practices is not available. The purpose of this article is to propose a typology for understanding ways school counselors engage families. This typology has specific implications for assessment, service delivery, school counselor training, and future research.

 

Citation

McCarthy, S., & Watson, D. (2018). A new typology: Four perspectives of school counselor involvement with families. Journal of School Counseling, 16(1). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v16n1.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

Volume 16, Number 2:

 

Exploring School Counselors’ Social Desirability, Multicultural Counseling Competence, and Demographics in the Midwest

Daniel A. DeCino, University of South Dakota, Molly M. Strear, San Francisco State University, and Seth Olson, University of South Dakota

 

Abstract

Multicultural counseling competence is vital for school counselors to meet the diverse needs of school communities. Furthermore, school counselors are called upon to develop and maintain their multicultural counseling competencies throughout the course of their careers. This study explored perceived multicultural counseling competencies of school counselors (N=320) in three Midwestern states. Data sources were the Multicultural Counseling Inventory (MCI), Marlowe-Crown Social Desirability Scale, Short Form-C (MC-C), and demographic questions. Results demonstrated statistical significance between gender, years of experience, and social desirability across subscales of the MCI. Implications for school counselors and school counselor educators are provided.

 

Citation

DeCino, D. A., Strear, M. M., & Olson, S. (2018). Exploring school counselors’ social desirability, multicultural counseling competence, and demographics in the Midwest. Journal of School Counseling, 16(2). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v16n2.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

Volume 16, Number 3:

 

Reported Experiences of School Counseling Site Supervisors in a Supervision Training Program

Clare Merlin-Knoblich, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Pamela N. Harris, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Sharon Y. Chung, North Carolina State University, and Christopher R. Gareis, College of William & Mary

 

Abstract

Many professional school counselors regularly serve as site supervisors to school counselors-in-training, despite never receiving formal supervision training. Using a phenomenological approach, the researchers explored school counseling site supervisors’ (N = 15) experiences in a clinical faculty school counseling university supervision training program. Findings included reported enhanced knowledge of supervision models and increased intentionality in supervision. Overall, participants’ experiences suggest meaningful outcomes associated with a counselor educator-led supervision training program for school counseling site supervisors.

 

Citation

Merlin-Knoblich, C., Harris, P. N., Chung, S. Y., & Gareis, C. R. (2018). Reported experiences of school counseling site supervisors in a supervision training program. Journal of School Counseling, 16(3). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v16n3.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

Volume 16, Number 4:

 

School Counselor and School Nurse Collaboration: Partnering for K-12 Student Success

Malti Tuttle, Morgan Yordy, Brandee Appling, and Erika Hanley, Auburn University

 

Abstract

School counselors and school nurses strive to support the well-being of students in K-12 school settings. Both professionals often overlap and interact with the same students prompting the need for effective collaboration. The purpose of this article is to introduce a collaboration model to assist school counselors and school nurses in forming a partnership to support students in K-12 school settings in attaining positive mental and physical health, thereby increasing overall school success.

 

Citation

Tuttle, M., Yordy, M., Appling, B., & Hanley, E. (2018). School counselor and school nurse collaboration: Partnering for K-12 student success. Journal of School Counseling, 16(4). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v16n4.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

Volume 16, Number 5:

 

Counseling Relationship Experiences for K-12 School Counselors Who Also Fulfill the Role of Anti-bullying Specialist

Nicole M. Arcuri, Lock Haven University of Pennsylvania

 

Abstract

This qualitative study explores school counselors’ experiences of the counseling relationship with students when also fulfilling the role of anti-bullying specialist. School counselors who also serve students as the anti-bullying specialist embrace a dual role with students. Interviews with school counselors practicing multiple role to include counselor and anti-bullying specialist were analyzed by the researcher for consistent and inconsistent experiences. The findings can provide guidance for the development and evaluation of school counselor role definitions that safeguard counseling effectiveness. Given that anti-bullying efforts in schools are required by federal law, understanding the indicated model policy, the outcomes in the state of New Jersey and their implications for school counselors in their role as an anti-bullying specialist is imperative. Participant feedback can provide school counseling graduate programs with data to analyze effectiveness of training practices for current real-world job roles and current school counselors with evidence for advocacy efforts.

 

Citation

Arcuri, N. M. (2018). Counseling relationship experiences for K-12 school counselors who also fulfill the role of anti-bullying specialist. Journal of School Counseling, 16(5). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v16n5.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

Volume 16, Number 6:

 

School Counselor Technology Use and School-Family-Community Partnerships

Sarah Cronin, Marguerite Ohrtman, Emily Colton, Brita Crouse, Jessica Depuydt, Camille Merwin, and Megan Rinn, University of Minnesota –Twin Cities

 

Abstract

Research in understanding effective strategies to develop stakeholder engagement is needed to further define the school counselor role and best outreach practices. School counselors are increasing their daily technology use. This study explores how school counselor technology use is related to school-family-community partnerships. School counselors (N = 87) answered questions about technology use and school-family-community partnerships. Results indicated certain technology resources were significantly correlated with school-family-community partnerships. Implications for school counselors and future research directions are discussed.

 

Citation

Cronin, S., Ohrtman, M., Colton, E., Crouse, B., Depuydt, J., Merwin, C., & Rinn, M. (2018). School counselor technology use and school-family-community partnerships. Journal of School Counseling, 16(6). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v16n6.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

Volume 16, Number 7:

 

Assessing the Counseling and Non-Counseling Roles of School Counselors

Jan W. Chandler, Rainbow City, Alabama, Joy J. Burnham, The University of Alabama, Morgan E. Kiper Riechel, Mercer University, Carol A. Dahir, New York Institute of Technology, Carolyn B. Stone, University of North Florida, Dariel F. Oliver, Alexander City, Alabama, and Amy P. Davis and Kenya G. Bledsoe, The University of Alabama

 

Abstract

Counseling and non-counseling duties were investigated. The Assessment of School Counselor Needs for Professional Development (ASCNPD; Dahir & Stone, 2003, 2004) was used to examine the practices of 1,244 school counselors to determine the prevalence of the activities among school counselors. Principal component analysis indicated a two-factor structure for the ASCNPD related to “counseling duties” and “non-counseling duties.” Additional analyses using MANOVA revealed significant grade level differences and urban and rural school differences. Results and implications related to counseling roles and role confusion are discussed.

 

Citation

Chandler, J. W., Burnham, J. J., Riechel, M. E. K., Dahir, C. A., Stone, C. B., Oliver, D. F., … Bledsoe, K. G. (2018). Assessing the counseling and non-counseling roles of school counselors. Journal of School Counseling, 16(7). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v16n7.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

Volume 16, Number 8:

 

A Phenomenological Analysis of the Impact of Teen Pregnancy on Education Attainment: Implications for School Counselors

Angel Riddick Dowden, North Carolina A&T State University, Kendra Gray, Asheboro City Schools, and Niah White, Glacia Ethridge, Natalie Spencer, and Quintin Boston, North Carolina A&T State University

 

Abstract

The purpose of the study was to explore, in depth, the impact teen pregnancy has on education attainment for girls 13-19 years of age across racial/ethnicity and socioeconomic status. Eight girls from African American/Black and Hispanic/Latino ethnic backgrounds participated in the study. Critical race theoretical framework was utilized for the study. Results identified six themes: sex education, social stigma and psychological stress about being a pregnant or parenting teen girl, teen parenthood, impacts of male relationships, support systems, and accountability and responsibility. Strategies for school counselors working with pregnant and parenting teen girls are provided.

 

Citation

Dowden, A. R., Gray, K., White, N., Ethridge,, G., Spencer, N., & Boston, Q. (2018). A phenomenological analysis of the impact of teen pregnancy on education attainment: Implications for school counselors. Journal of School Counseling, 16(8). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v16n8.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

Volume 16, Number 9:

 

Exploration of Potential Predictor Variables Leading to School Counselor Burnout

Leigh Falls Holman, University of Memphis, Richard Watts and Rebecca Robles-Pina, Sam Houston State University, and Lisa Grubbs, Texas Women’s University

 

Abstract

Job stress and burnout negatively impact school counselors and the school communities in which they serve. This study explores variables previously indicated by the literature as potentially contributing to school counselor job stress or burnout. These include size of caseload, location of school (urban, suburban, rural), grade level served (elementary, middle, high school), and counselor ethnicity. Although we found some significant ethnic differences in development of job stress; overall, our findings contradicted the literature on each of these variables. We explore reasons for differences in findings and make suggestions for future research.

 

Citation

Holman, L. F., Watts, R., Robles-Pina, R., & Grubbs, L. (2018). Exploration of potential predictor variables leading to school counselor burnout. Journal of School Counseling, 16(9). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v16n9.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

Volume 16, Number 10:

 

Refugee Children Acculturation: Group Process in Schools as Cultural Microcosms

Thomas Killian, Marist College, Betty Cardona, University of Northern Colorado and Lainey J. Brottem, University of Minnesota

 

Abstract

In the US, school attendance is mandated for refugee children. These children endure sudden immersion and must acculturate into this novel culture, whose customs often vastly diverge from their native culture’s values. Refugee children often struggle with acculturation-related mental health issues, such as internalizing significantly clashing native and host cultural values. Without navigational assistance, refugee children may get lost in the new culture. Possibly the best-suited helpers for them are school counselors, who are uniquely positioned to facilitate acculturation with group work experiences. This paper provides examples of group interventions and explores implications with a theoretically grounded acculturation model.

 

Citation

Killian, T., Cardona, B., & Brottem, L. J. (2018). Refugee children acculturation: Group process in schools as cultural microcosms. Journal of School Counseling, 16(10). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v16n10.pdf

 

Type of Article

Innovative Methods

Volume 16, Number 11:

 

Youth in Foster Care as Victims and Perpetrators of Teen Dating Violence

Colleen Chalmers, Tonika Duren Green, and Ashley Kruger, San Diego State University

 

Abstract

Youth who experience child abuse and family violence have a greater likelihood of being a victim or perpetrator of teen dating violence (Foshee et al., 2008; Wolfe et al., 2009). This article discusses the impact of dating violence on foster youth’s behavior, academics, and social life. Currently, there are very few resources and evidence-based practices for school counselors who work with this population. Recommendations are provided for (a) implementing and improving district policies, and (b) developing and implementing programs to prevent, identify, and intervene in violent relationships (Wekerle et al., 2009).

 

Citation

Chalmers, C., Green, T. D., & Kruger, A. (2018). Youth in foster care as victims and perpetrators of teen dating violence. Journal of School Counseling, 16(11). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v16n11.pdf

 

Type of Article

Innovative Methods

Volume 16, Number 12:

 

Increasing School Counselors’ Understanding of Factors that Influence Latina/o Adolescents’ College-Going Beliefs

Javier Cavazos Vela, Federico Guerra, Christian Garcia, and Yvette Hinojosa, University of Texas Rio Grande Valley

 

Abstract

A quantitative, predictive design was used to explore how positive psychology, mental health, and cultural factors influenced Latina/o adolescents’ college-going beliefs. By using multiple regression analysis, findings indicated that hope and life satisfaction were significant predictors of college-going beliefs. We provide a discussion regarding the importance of these findings as well as recommendations for school counselors.

 

Citation

Vela, J. C., Guerra, F., Garcia, C., & Hinojosa, Y. (2018). Increasing school counselors’ understanding of factors that influence Latina/o adolescents’ college-going beliefs. Journal of School Counseling, 16(12). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v16n12.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

Volume 16, Number 13:

 

Fostering Elementary Career Exploration With an Interactive, Technology-Based Career Development Unit

Mary Edwin and Diandra Prescod, The Pennsylvania State University

 

Abstract

Career development is a lifelong process that begins in childhood and has been linked to student success in other aspects of their development in childhood and adulthood (Blackhurst, Auger, & Wahl, 2003). This article presents a fifth-grade technology-based career development curriculum that engages students in a 10-week long exploration of interests, skills, college degrees and careers, and culminates with students creating career trifold display boards and presenting them to community members. School counselors can use this career exploration unit to support students’ career development and to begin the lifelong process of preparing them for success in the world of work.

 

Citation

Edwin, M., & Prescod, D. (2018). Fostering elementary career exploration with an interactive, technology-based career development unit. Journal of School Counseling, 16(13). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v16n13.pdf

 

Type of Article

Innovative Methods

Volume 16, Number 14:

 

Investigating the Effectiveness of a Motivational Interviewing Group on Academic Motivation

Daniel Gutierrez, College of William and Mary, and Sejal P. Foxx and Elvita Kondili, University of North Carolina at Charlotte

 

Abstract

This randomized controlled trial examines the effectiveness of a motivational interviewing (MI) group on the academic motivation of students at an alternative school (N = 43). Findings demonstrated that MI groups are effective in increasing extrinsic motivation, whereas both the waiting list control and study skills comparison group did not demonstrate statistical significance. The findings of this study have several implications for school-based motivation enhancement interventions.

 

Citation

Gutierrez, D., Foxx, S. P., & Kondili, E. (2018). Investigating the effectiveness of a motivational interviewing group on academic motivation. Journal of School Counseling, 16(14). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v16n14.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research