Journal of School Counseling

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The articles published in JSC are indexed in ERIC (Education Resources Information Center).

 

2016

Volume 14, Number 1:

 

Supporting Every Child: School Counselors’ Perceptions of Juvenile Sex Offenders in Schools

Leann Wyrick Morgan and Levi S. McClendon, University of Texas at Tyler, Jenna McCarty, University of Colorado – Colorado Springs, and Kirk Zinck, University of Texas at Tyler

 

Abstract

Researchers explored the attitudes and concerns of professional school counselors in their roles in working with juvenile sex offenders (JSOs) who attend school. Little empirical data exist regarding school counselors’ roles in effectively engaging and supporting JSOs toward school success. Focus groups contributed to the consensual qualitative research (CQR) methodology, providing a framework for investigating concerns, experiences, attitudes, and beliefs related to juvenile sex offenders and school climate. The authors present findings of five systematic themes and the implications for school counselor best practice.

 

Citation

Morgan, L. W., McClendon, L. S., McCarty, J., & Zinck, K. (2016). Supporting every child: School counselors’ perceptions of juvenile sex offenders in schools. Journal of School Counseling, 14(1). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v14n1.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 14, Number 2:

 

Eating Issues and Body Image in Elementary School: Detection and Prevention Strategies for School Counselors

Sarah I. Springer, Temple University, and Dana Heller Levitt, Montclair State University

 

Abstract

Body image disturbance continues to be recognized in increasingly younger populations. Eating issues among elementary school children have become more overt and statistically prevalent in recent years. Elementary school counselors are in important positions to provide their communities with early detection information and prevention strategies. This manuscript will identify potential causes and risks associated with body image disturbance in elementary school-age children and present strategies for school counselors that address detection, prevention, and intervention efforts.

 

Citation

Springer, S. I. & Levitt, D. H. (2016). Eating issues and body image in elementary school: Detection and prevention strategies for school counselors. Journal of School Counseling, 14(2). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v14n2.pdf

 

Type of Article

Innovative Methods

 

Volume 14, Number 3:

 

Professional Capacity Building for School Counselors Through School-wide Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports (SWPBIS) Implementation

Jennifer Betters-Bubon, University of Wisconsin-Whitewater, and Peg Donohue, Central Connecticut State University

 

Abstract

The implementation of school-wide positive behavioral interventions and supports (SWPBIS) has been shown to reduce behavioral incidents and lead to more positive school climates. Despite the growing popularity in schools, there lacks clear understanding of the school counselor role in this approach. We present the perspectives of an elementary school counselor and middle school counselor engaged in starting SWPBIS programs. This position paper is focused on how the alignment of school counseling and SWPBIS programs can lead to increased school counselor leadership capacity, resulting in collaborative teaming, the use of data and systemic school change.

 

Citation

Betters-Bubon, J., & Donohue, P. (2016). Professional capacity building for school counselors through school-wide positive behavior interventions and supports implementation. Journal of School Counseling, 14(3). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v14n3.pdf

 

Type of Article

Current Issues

 

Volume 14, Number 4:

 

Predictors of Parent Involvement and their Impact on Access of Postsecondary Education Facilitators among White and American Indian Parents

Gerta Bardhoshi, University of Iowa, Kelly Duncan, Northern State University, and Amy Schweinle, University of South Dakota

 

Abstract

This study examined demographic factors as predictors of parent involvement (engagement with school, support of learning, support of child) among parents of children that attended a school implementing a college access program. The authors also examined whether involvement predicted access of postsecondary education facilitators in parents, when accounting for demographic factors. Results from multiple regression analyses indicated that parent race/ethnicity and income predicted involvement, while education level predicted access of postsecondary education facilitators. However, when including demographic factors, parent involvement was not predictive of access of postsecondary education facilitators.

 

Citation

Bardhoshi, G., Duncan, K., & Schweinle, A. (2016). Predictors of parent involvement and their impact on access of postsecondary education facilitators among White and American Indian parents. Journal of School Counseling, 14(4). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v14n4.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 14, Number 5:

 

An Exploratory Study of the Child Disciplinary Practices of Jamaican Immigrant Parents in the United States: Implications for School Counselors

Stephaney S. Morrison, City University of New York - Hunter College, Delores E. Smith, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Julia A. Bryan, Pennsylvania State University, and Janeé M. Steele, Western Michigan University

 

Abstract

Jamaican immigrant students are highly represented in U.S. public schools, primarily in regions concentrated throughout the east coast. Many of these students and their families have personal and social concerns that have implications for school counselors. In particular, scholars suggest that among this population, harsh methods of child discipline (e.g., corporal punishment) are prevalent and have ramifications for academic achievement, child abuse reporting, and socialization within the school. Few studies, however, document the disciplinary techniques of Jamaican immigrants in the United States. This exploratory study was

 

Citation

Morrison, S. S., Smith, D. E., Bryan, J. A., & Steele, J. M. (2016). An exploratory study of the child disciplinary practices of Jamaican immigrant parents in the United States: Implications for school counselors. Journal of School Counseling, 14(5). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v14n5.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 14, Number 6:

 

Mandala Mornings: A Creative Approach for Elementary School Counselors

Katrina Cook and Mary G. Mayorga, Texas A&M University-San Antonio, and Veronica Ball, Archdiocese of San Antonio, Department of Catholic Schools

 

Abstract

The American School Counselor Association (ASCA, 2012) has identified one of the ways elementary school counselors can assist students to become successful in school is to offer small group counseling through the responsive services delivery system. Expressive arts, such as creating mandalas, provide a non-threatening approach for school counselors to support the students they serve. This article describes how elementary school counselors in a large school district incorporated mandalas in the delivery of their responsive services. An example of an early morning group using mandalas is described.

 

Citation

Cook, K., Mayorga, M. G, & Ball, V. (2016). Mandala mornings: A creative approach for elementary school counselors. Journal of School Counseling, 14(6). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v14n6.pdf

 

Type of Article

Innovative Methods

 

Volume 14, Number 7:

 

Understanding Support From School Counselors as Predictors of Mexican American Adolescents’ College-Going Beliefs

Javier Cavazos Vela, University of Texas Rio Grande Valley, Brande Flamez, Lamar University, and Gregory Scott Sparrow and Eunice Lerma, University of Texas Rio Grande Valley

 

Abstract

The impact of high school counselors’ support on Mexican American adolescents’ college-going beliefs was examined. We used a quantitative, predictive design to explore predictors of Mexican American adolescents’ college-going beliefs. Perceptions of accessibility and expectations from school counselors positively impacted college-going beliefs while perceptions of appraisal negatively impacted college-going beliefs. In addition to a discussion regarding the importance of these findings, implications for school counselors and researchers are offered.

 

Citation

Vela, J. C., Flamez, B., Sparrow, G. S., & Lerma, E. (2016). Understanding support from school counselors as predictors of Mexican American adolescents’ college-going beliefs. Journal of School Counseling, 14(7). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v14n7.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 14, Number 8:

 

The Qualitative Impact of Adventure Based Counseling on Sixth Grade General Education Students

Richard L Albright, Lee University

 

Abstract

General education, middle school students’ experience and outcomes related to their participation in adventure based counseling (ABC) were investigated through the use of qualitative research case study design. Research questions examine what students expect, experience, and perceive as the impact of an adventure based intervention. Analysis of interviews, researcher observations, field notes, and journaling provide key insights into ABC programming. Students’ expectations were such that they expected to have fun, but were fearful, yet confident. An examination of their immediate reactions to the intervention revealed that the students experienced physical challenge and success, social challenge and success, emotional challenge and success, as well as cognitive challenge and success. A key finding from an interview session with students completed well after the activities took place revealed that students believed that the intervention had a positive impact socially for themselves as well as their classmates. These insights into ABC provide facilitators, school counselors, teachers, and administrators valuable information on the constructs through which participant growth occurs and recommendations for planning and facilitating such programming.

 

Citation

Albright, R. L. (2016). The qualitative impact of adventure based counseling on sixth grade general education students. Journal of School Counseling, 14(8). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v14n8.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

Volume 14, Number 9:

 

Collaborative Relationships Between Principals and School Counselors: Facilitating a Model for Developing a Working Alliance

Melissa A. Odegard-Koester and Paul Watkins, Southeast Missouri State University

 

Abstract

The working relationship between principals and school counselors have received some attention in the literature, however, little empirical research exists that examines specifically the components that facilitate a collaborative working relationship between the principal and school counselor. This qualitative case study examined the unique perspective for building a leader-member relationship between the principal and school counselor. Specifically, the case study examined the experiences of the working relationship of a principal and school counselor in a rural Midwestern elementary school. Data analysis revealed that the following three shared themes emerged: student-centered focus, role differentiation, and trust. From these themes and their descriptions a collaborative working relationship resulted. As a result, the principal school counselor model evolved. Implications for principals and school counselors as well as future research are presented.

 

Citation

Odegard-Koester, M. A., & Watkins, P. (2016). Collaborative relationships between principals and school counselors: Facilitating a model for developing a working alliance. Journal of School Counseling, 14(9). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v14n9.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

Volume 14, Number 10:

 

Person-Centered Counseling and Solution-Focused Brief Therapy: An Integrative Model for School Counselors

Merry Leigh Dameron, University of North Carolina at Charlotte

 

Abstract

Increasing demands upon the time of the professional school counselor combined with the call by the American School Counselor Association to provide direct services to students may lead many in the profession to wonder from what theoretical standpoint(s) they can best meet these lofty goals. I propose a two phase approach combining person-centered counseling with solution-focused brief therapy as a concrete, functional method to address student counseling needs within the school setting.

 

Citation

Dameron, M. L. (2016). Person-centered counseling and solution-focused brief therapy: An integrative model for school counselors. Journal of School Counseling, 14(10). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v14n10.pdf

 

Type of Article

Innovative Methods

Volume 14, Number 11:

 

Family Matters: An Investigation of Family Coursework in School Counseling Programs

J. Richelle Joe, University of Central Florida, and Pamela N. Harris, University of North Carolina at Greensboro

 

Abstract

School counselors are expected to form collaborative relationships with the families of students. Yet, school counselors have limited knowledge about families to form these partnerships, as a descriptive content analysis of the family coursework requirements in CACREP-accredited school counseling programs in the southern region revealed that most programs do not mandate family coursework. Implications for the preparation of students to engage in school-family collaboration are discussed.

 

Citation

Joe, J. R., & Harris, P. N. (2016). Family matters: An investigation of family coursework in school counseling programs. Journal of School Counseling, 14(11). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v14n11.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

Volume 14, Number 12:

 

Evidence-Informed Recommendations to Promote Black Student Engagement

Shyrea J. Minton, California State University, Northridge

 

Abstract

In 2012, Black students dropped out of school at a rate of 7.5% (NCES, 2013a). While this is the second lowest dropout rate for this population in 55 years, Black students are still dropping out at nearly twice the rate (4.3%) of their White counterparts. This paper includes a review of literature related to this phenomenon and offers evidence-informed recommendations taken from the literature for professional school counselors to utilize to improve academic engagement of Black students. These recommendations include: facilitating difficult dialogues on race, using a Student Success Skills program, and entering into school-family-community partnerships.

 

Citation

Minton, S. J. (2016). Evidence-informed recommendations to promote Black student engagement. Journal of School Counseling, 14(12). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v14n12.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

Volume 14, Number 13:

 

Boys II Men: A Culturally-Responsive School Counseling Group for Urban High School Boys of Color

Leyla Pérez-Gualdrón, Christine Yeh, and LyRyan Russell, University of San Francisco

 

Abstract

Using a participatory and collaborative approach, we developed, implemented, and evaluated a culturally responsive school counseling group, Boys II Men, for 11 low-income diverse male students of color at an urban public school. The content of the group focused on five areas: social connections and support, exploring gender roles, navigating identities, school engagement, and future planning. We worked closely with teachers, school staff, and counselors to foster a supportive and positive school climate (Beesley, 2004). Each student was interviewed about his experience in the group to assess the impact of the strategies and techniques used. We also analyzed the specific content of each module for main themes. Strengths and weaknesses of the group were also assessed at post-test. Innovative methods and practical applications for school counselors are discussed.

 

Citation

Pérez-Gualdrón, L., Yeh, C., & Russell, L. (2016). Boys II Men: A culturally-responsive school counseling group for urban high school boys of color. Journal of School Counseling, 14(13). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v14n13.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

Volume 14, Number 14:

 

Working With Nonsuicidal Self-Injurious Adolescents

Mark D. Nelson, Montana State University, and Rian Piccin, Lander, Wyoming

 

Abstract

Nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) has evolved into a serious issue for adolescents, and is encountered in school systems across the United States. The ability of school counselors and other professionals working in the school environment to understand and assist students who exhibit signs of NSSI is critically important. Research remains minimal on the subject and it is unclear whether or not schools across the country have proper protocols in place for working with students who exhibit signs of NSSI. School professionals should be familiar with NSSI, how to identify NSSI behaviors in students, and proper protocols for working with students who exhibit signs of NSSI.

 

Citation

Nelson, M. D., & Piccin, R. (2016). Working with nonsuicidal self-injurious adolescents. Journal of School Counseling, 14(12). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v14n14.pdf

 

Type of Article

Current Issues

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