Journal of School Counseling

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The articles published in JSC are indexed in ERIC (Education Resources Information Center).

2017

 

Special Edition: Volume 15, Nos. 1-6

Enriching Student Well-Being and Success

Volume 15, Number 1:

Creating School Climates That Foster Inclusive Community Attitudes Toward Gender Nonconforming Students

Layla J. Kurt, University of Dayton

 

Abstract

Transgender students are a marginalized group of students who are calling for recognition and acceptance of their identities. Although Title IX assures students of freedom from discrimination based on sexual identity, many schools are struggling with policies that adequately provide these protections. Based on a previous qualitative study conducted by the author, this manuscript provides strategies that school counselors and other educators can implement to create a school climate that is safe, equitable, and fosters the well-being and success of transgender students.

 

Citation

Kurt, L. J. (2017). Creating school climates that foster inclusive community attitudes toward gender nonconforming students. Journal of School Counseling, 15(1). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v15n1.pdf

 

Type of Article

Current Issues

 

Volume 15, Number 2:

 

Transition to Post-secondary Life for Students with Disabilities: Promoting Student Success

Theresa A. Quigney, Cleveland State University

 

Abstract

The transition to life after high school for students with disabilities and the vital role that school counselors have in assisting the students and their families to achieve success are discussed. As there may be unique requirements for these students in making this transition, it is important that school counselors are acquainted with particular matters and techniques critical to student success. The educational categories of disabilities and special considerations that are presented may be beneficial to school counselors as they enhance their students’ opportunities to achieve their goals.

 

Citation

Quigney, T. A. (2017). Transition to post-secondary life for students with disabilities: Promoting student success. Journal of School Counseling, 15(2). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v15n2.pdf

 

Type of Article

Current Issues

 

Volume 15, Number 3:

 

Promoting Low-income Students’ College Readiness, Well-being, and Success: A GEAR UP Counseling Program Study

Lorri M. Capizzi, San Jose State University, Carolyn Huie Hofstetter, University of California, San Diego, and Dolores D. Mena, Brent Duckor, and Xiaolu Hu, San Jose State University

 

Abstract

This article documents narrative experiences from alumni who participated in the GEAR UP program. The San Jose State University GEAR UP program, based on an intensive counseling model, is grounded in social capital and resilience theories, and is designed to increase the number of low-income students who are prepared to enter and succeed in postsecondary education. Qualitative findings from surveys and semi-structured interviews with GEAR UP alumni highlight the power of this intensive counseling model in providing meaning, connectedness, and a sense of empowerment for students to support their personal and academic development, college readiness, and overall well-being.

 

Citation

Capizzi, L. M., Hofstetter, C. H., Mena. D. D., Duckor, B., & Hu, X. (2017). Promoting low-income students’ college readiness, well-being, and success: A GEAR UP counseling program study. Journal of School Counseling, 15(3). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v15n3.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 15, Number 4:

 

School Counselors’ Role in Dropout Prevention and Credit Recovery

Donna Tromski-Klingshirn and Yoko Miura, Wright State University

 

Abstract

This article introduces credit recovery (CR) programs to school counseling. Traditionally the school counselors’ role in CR has been limited to referring students who are, or who have, failed courses. Based on own our findings from a study of a large Midwest high school (N = 2,000) CR program, we make specific recommendations for school counselors to advocate for, and intervene with, failing students. Further, we propose a new instructional leadership role for school counselors within the instructional leadership team (ILT) to lead credit recovery efforts within the schools.

 

Citation

Tromski-Klingshirn, D. & Miura, Y. (2017). School counselors’ role in dropout prevention and credit recovery. Journal of School Counseling, 15(4). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v15n4.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 15, Number 5:

 

Mental Health and Social Emotional Programming in Schools: Missing Link or Misappropriation?

Trigg A. Even, University of North Texas Dallas, and Heather L. Quast, Texas A&M University Commerce

 

Abstract

While differences of opinion exist on whether mental health services fall within the scope of public education, schools may represent the best opportunity to provide young people with necessary access to mental health care. Professional school counselors are uniquely qualified by training and experience to address the mental health and social emotional development needs of students, yet may be underutilized for this purpose, in part because school counselors may not be speaking the language of education, that is, academic achievement. The authors questioned whether school counseling is the missing link to advancing academic achievement or a misappropriation that deters schools from accomplishing their core mission. The literature relevant to the relationship between mental health programming and academic achievement was reviewed and recommended talking points for professional advocacy are discussed.

 

Citation

Even, T. A., & Quast, H. L. (2017). Mental health and social emotional programming in schools: Missing link or misappropriation? Journal of School Counseling, 15(5). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v15n5.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 15, Number 6:

 

School Counselors and Multicultural Education: Applying the Five Dimensions

Clare Merlin, University of North Carolina, Charlotte

 

Abstract

Multicultural education is an educational approach designed to ensure equal educational opportunities for all students, including those in marginalized groups. This approach has historically been directed towards teachers, but school counselors have the appropriate training and skills to lead multicultural education efforts, as well. In this article, the five dimensions of multicultural education are described and examples are provided that suggest how school counselors can use each dimension in order to create a context in which all students succeed.

 

Citation

Merlin, C. (2017). School counselors and multicultural education: Applying the five dimensions. Journal of School Counseling, 15(6). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v15n6.pdf

 

Type of Article

Current Issues

 

 

Volume 15, Number 7:

 

Motivational Interviewing, the Transtheoretical Model of Change, and Academic Development

Jered B. Kolbert, Brittany L. Happe, Debra Hyatt-Burkhart, and Laura M. Crothers, Duquesne University, and Marissa Capuzzi, Greater Latrobe School District

 

Abstract

Motivational interviewing (Miller & Rollnick, 2012) and the transtheoretical model of change (Prochaska, Norcross, & DiClimente, 2007) offer potential considerable benefits to professional school counselors’ efforts to promote academic development. We describe how these models can be used by professional school counselors in the provision of what are referred to as responsive services in the ASCA National Model (ASCA, 2012), which includes individual counseling, individual student planning, and the indirect services of collaboration and consultation with parents and teachers as they strive to support student academic achievement. We offer two case studies to illustrate the adaptation and employment of the approaches discussed in the paper.

 

Citation

Kolbert, J. B., Happe, B. L., Hyatt-Burkhart, D., Crothers, L. M., & Capuzzi, M. (2017). Motivational interviewing, the transtheoretical model of change, and academic development. Journal of School Counseling, 15(7). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v15n7.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 15, Number 8:

 

Myths and Misconceptions About LGBTQ Youth: School Counselors’ Role in Advocacy

Roberto L. Abreu, University of Kentucky, and Adriana G. McEachern and Maureen C. Kenny, Florida International University

 

Abstract

Although schools are thought to be safe environments for all students, sexual minority and gender expansive (i.e., LGBTQ) students often feel unsafe and unwelcome as a result of misconceptions about their identity. This paper explores eight commonly held myths and misconceptions about LGBTQ youth. The role of professional school counselors (PSCs) in debunking these myths and advocating for these students will be discussed. Implications for practice and future research will be addressed.

 

Citation

Abreu, R., McEachern, A. G., & Kenny, M. C. (2017). Myths and misconceptions about LGBTQ youth: school counselors’ role in advocacy. Journal of School Counseling, 15(8). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v15n8.pdf

 

Type of Article

Current Issues

 

Volume 15, Number 9:

 

A Randomized Controlled Study Evaluating a Brief, Bystander Bullying Intervention with Junior High School Students

Aida Midgett, Diana Doumas, Rhiannon Trull, and April D. Johnston, Boise State University

 

Abstract

A randomized controlled study evaluated a brief, bystander bullying intervention for junior high school students. Students in both groups reported an increase in knowledge and confidence to act as defenders and to utilize strategies to intervene on behalf of victims of bullying. Findings suggest possible carry-over effects from the intervention group to control group. Students in the intervention group, however, reported a significantly greater ability to identify of bullying and a decrease in anxiety (p = .06) relative to the control group. There were no differences in reported depression between the two groups. Implications for school counselors are discussed.

 

Citation

Midgett, A., Doumas, D., Trull, R., & Johnston, A. D. (2017). A randomized controlled study evaluating a brief, bystander bullying intervention with junior high school students. Journal of School Counseling, 15(9). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v15n9.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 15, Number 10:

 

Black and Latino Fathers of Students with Autism: Culturally Responsive Support

Michael D. Hannon, Montclair State University, Kaprea F. Johnson, Old Dominion University, and Nicole A. Christian and LaChan V. Hannon, Montclair State University

 

Abstract

Perspectives from five Black and Latino fathers of students with autism are shared from this qualitative pilot study. The fathers were asked to describe the most helpful forms of support from school counselors. One-time, semi-structured interviews were conducted and interpreted with the thematic analysis method. Results suggest support from other parents, and specifically from other fathers, with shared experiences is most helpful. Recommendations for school counseling practice and research are shared.

 

Citation

Hannon, M. D., Johnson, K. F., Christian, N. A., & Hannon, L. V. (2017). Black and Latino fathers of students with autism: Culturally responsive support. Journal of School Counseling, 15(10). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v15n10.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 15, Number 11:

 

Professional Issues in School Counseling and Suicide Prevention

Laura L. Gallo, Boise State University

 

Abstract

Suicide is the second leading cause of death for adolescents and has become a public health concern in the United States. In addition, certain groups of students are more at risk for suicide than others. School counselors have an ethical obligation to protect their students and are in an ideal position to educate students and staff about the risks and warning signs of suicide. Ethical issues such as counselor competence, school responsibility, and community buy in are important considerations for educators. Lastly, implications for practicing school counselors in preventing suicide are provided.

 

Citation

Gallo, L. L. (2017). Professional issues in school counseling and suicide prevention. Journal of School Counseling, 15(11). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v15n11.pdf

 

Type of Article

Current Issues

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