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The articles published in JSC are indexed in ERIC (Education Resources Information Center).

 

2014

Volume 12, Number 1:

 

An Ethics Challenge for School Counselors: Part 2

Janet G. Froeschle Hicks, Nicole Noble, Steve Berry, Steve Talbert, Charles Crews, and Jiaqi Li, Texas Tech University, and Yvette Castillo, West Texas A&M University

 

Abstract

Ethical and legal issues are dealt with daily by school counselors (Bodenhorn, 2006; Moyer, Sullivan & Growcock, 2012). Despite the prevalence of these issues, few resources exist to assist these professionals when making ethical and legal decisions. In addition, a lack of supervision for school counselors and managing complexities inherent when working with minors creates a need for continuous training (Moyer, Sullivan, & Growcock, 2012; Remley & Herlihy, 2007). As a result, this article intends to assist school counselors in making proper ethical and legal decisions. Each ethical dilemma is described via a quiz format to further ethical knowledge and discussion. Real cases, as submitted by school counselors, are described and followed by suggestions as based on ethical codes.

 

Citation

Hicks, J. G. F., Noble, N., Berry, S., Talbert, S., Crews, C., Li, J., & Castillo, Y. (2014). An Ethics Challenge for School Counselors: Part 2. Journal of School Counseling, 12(1). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v12n1.pdf

 

Type of Article

Current Issues

 

Volume 12, Number 2:

 

My Name Is Not Michael: Strategies for Promoting Cultural Responsiveness in Schools

Lisa L. Schulz, Kara Hurt, and Natalya Lindo, University of North Texas

 

Abstract

With the changing cultural demographics in U.S. classrooms, school counselors must develop innovative approaches to promote culturally responsive school climates and organizational change. A vision is offered of systemic cultural responsiveness and culturally relevant teaching practices that nurture and engage all learners. The role of the school counselor in realizing such transformation is described. In this vision, the tenets of advocacy, consultation, collaboration, systemic change, and leadership identified in the ASCA National Model are recognized as the means by which the school counselor can indirectly promote student achievement. This article offers examples of intervention strategies designed to impact the school system, the teaching and learning process, and foster cultural responsiveness. Recommendations for advancing the role of the school counselor are shared.

 

Citation

Schulz, L. L., Hurt, K., & Lindo, N. (2014). My name is not Michael: Strategies for promoting cultural responsiveness in schools. Journal of School Counseling, 12(2). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v12n2.pdf

 

Type of Article

Current Issues

 

Volume 12, Number 3:

 

Perceptions of Preparedness for a Major School Crisis: An Evaluation of Missouri School Counselors

Danilea Werner, Auburn University

 

Abstract

A major school crisis can cause physical and emotional distress as well as impact student academic performance. The purpose of this study was to use a web-based survey to explore Missouri school counselors’ perceptions of individual and school-wide crisis preparedness and crisis training experiences. Results indicate that the more involved school counselors are in the crisis planning process the more prepared they feel. By understanding the differences in school counselor crisis preparedness perception and their involvement in crisis planning, educational institutions can design and target training to increase effectiveness and improve disaster response.

 

Citation

Werner, D. (2014). Perceptions of preparedness for a major school crisis: An evaluation of Missouri school counselors. Journal of School Counseling, 12(3). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v12n3.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 12, Number 4:

 

Where Are We Now? An Updated Review of the School Counseling Literature for Trends and Themes

Adam Zagelbaum, Sonoma State University, Theresa Kruczek and Charlene Alexander, Ball State University, and Hugh Crethar, Oklahoma State University

 

Abstract

The present study is a follow-up to an earlier investigation of themes and trends in school counseling journals. The original study examined articles pre- and post-merger of the American School Counseling Association (ASCA) journal(s) for content reflecting themes evolving from the Education Trust Initiative. This study evaluated literature reflected in the Professional School Counseling (PSC) journal articles since the adoption of the ASCA National Model to assess trends as well as to identify current values and issues in the profession. The results suggest content in professional journals is reflective the ASCA National Model and suggestions are offered regarding future publications.

 

Citation

Zagelbaum, A., Kruczek, T., Alexander, C., & Crethar, H. (2014). Where are we now? An updated review of the school counseling literature for trends and themes. Journal of School Counseling, 12(4). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v12n4.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 12, Number 5:

 

A Phenomenological Study of Urban School Counselors’ Perceptions of Low-Income Families

Rebekah F. Cole, Capella University, and Tim Grothaus, Old Dominion University

 

Abstract

This qualitative, phenomenological study explores urban school counselors’ perceptions of low-income families in their schools. Ten school counselors participated in two rounds of individual interviews and answered two emailed reflective questions. Six themes emerged from the data: (a) perceptions of family characteristics and environment, (b) perceptions of family attitudes and actions regarding education, (c) awareness of obstacles and challenges for families, (d) struggle empathizing with low-income families, (e) choice of roles in working with low-income families, and (f) personal feelings and reflections in response to experiences with low-income families. Implications for school counselors, supervisors, school counseling district supervisors, school counseling professional organizations, and counselor educators are discussed.

 

Citation

Cole, R. F., & Grothaus, T. (2014). A phenomenological study of urban school counselors’ perceptions of low-income families. Journal of School Counseling, 12(5). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v12n5.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 12, Number 6:

 

Spirituality and School Counselor Education and Supervision

Laura L. Gallo, University of Iowa

 

Abstract

Spirituality is an area that has not received a great deal of attention in supervision, yet it can have substantial effects on the counseling process. A definition of spirituality that allows for a variety of worldviews can be useful to both counselor and client as it helps strengthen the counseling relationship and lessen differences between them. In addition, there are counseling models that have been created to integrate the role of spirituality within supervision and to provide a framework for supervisees. Recommendations in how to incorporate spirituality for supervisors to use with school counselors in training are provided.

 

Citation

Gallo, L. L. (2014). Spirituality and school counselor education and supervision. Journal of School Counseling, 12(6). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v12n6.pdf

 

Type of Article

Professional Development

 

Volume 12, Number 7:

 

Bullying Prevention and the Parent Involvement Model

Jered B. Kolbert, Duquesne University, Danielle Schultz, Quaker Valley School District, and Laura M. Crothers, Duquesne University

 

Abstract

A recent meta-analysis of bullying prevention programs provides support for social-ecological theory, in which parent involvement addressing child bullying behaviors is seen as important in preventing school-based bullying. The purpose of this manuscript is to suggest how Epstein and colleagues’ parent involvement model can be used as a framework in implementing bullying prevention programs. School counselors can use the types of parent involvement identified in Epstein and van Voorhis (2010) model, including parenting, communicating, volunteering, learning at home, decision-making, and collaborating with the community, in working with parents and families in the service of promoting anti-bullying interventions and programming in school systems.

 

Citation

Kolbert, J. B., Schultz, D., & Crothers, L. M. (2014). Bullying prevention and the parent involvement model. Journal of School Counseling, 12(7). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v12n7.pdf

 

Type of Article

Innovative Methods

 

Volume 12, Number 8:

 

Social Media and Professional School Counselors: Ethical and Legal Considerations

Patrick R. Mullen, Catherine Griffith, Jennifer H. Greene, and Glenn W. Lambie, University of Central Florida

 

Abstract

The use of social media continues to expand in prevalence and is a medium of communication for individuals of all ages. Schools are using social media to engage their stakeholders at increasing rates. Therefore, school counselors require the knowledge and appreciation of ethical and legal issues regarding the use of such technology. The purpose of this manuscript is to: (a) introduce the development and prevalence of social media; (b) review legal and ethical issues related to social media use in schools; and (c) present strategies in which school counselors can engage in ethical interactions via social media.

 

Citation

Mullen, P. R., Griffith, C., Greene, J. H., & Lambie, G. W. (2014). Social media and professional school counselors: Ethical and legal considerations. Journal of School Counseling, 12(8). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v12n8.pdf

 

Type of Article

Current Issues

 

Volume 12, Number 9:

 

Promoting Educational Resilience Among African American Students at Risk of School Failure: The Role of School Counselors

Joseph M. Williams, George Mason University, Arie T. Greenleaf, Seattle University, Tracey Albert, George Mason University, and Erin F. Barnes, University of Texas at El Paso

 

Abstract

While the educational difficulties of African American students from low-income households are well documented and widely discussed in the literature, far less attention has been paid to students who succeed in school despite significant challenges such as poverty, housing instability, and food insecurity. A review of the literature identifies the protective factors and processes that facilitate academic success among African American (K-12) students placed at-risk of school failure. Implications for school counselors and recommendations for facilitating educational resiliency among African American students from low-income households are discussed.

 

Citation

Williams, J. M., Greenleaf, A. T., Albert, T., & Barnes, E. F. (2014). Promoting educational resilience among African American students at risk of school failure: The role of school counselors. Journal of School Counseling, 12(9). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v12n9.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 12, Number 10:

 

Building on Strengths and Addressing Challenges: Enhancing External School Counseling Program Evaluation

Ian Martin, University of San Diego, Sharon Rallis, University of Massachusetts, Amherst

 

Abstract

This conceptual paper outlines the implications associated with increasing external evaluation within school counseling programs. The authors propose that enhancing external evaluation may help to both strengthen school counseling programs and enhance their legitimacy within increasingly competitive and academically focused school systems. More specifically, the authors identify school-based evaluation (SBE) as a relevant and pragmatic tool to better support internal program evaluation strengths that already exist in the field through more intentional external program evaluation strategies. Two positive cases of external program evaluation are presented and discussed from an SBE perspective. Finally, the authors offer practitioners guidelines for building external SBE school counseling program evaluation practices and structures within their own local contexts.

 

Citation

Martin, M., & Rallis, S. (2014). Building on strengths and addressing challenges: Enhancing external school counseling program evaluation. Journal of School Counseling, 12(10). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v12n10.pdf

 

Type of Article

Current Issues

 

Volume 12, Number 11:

 

Transition to College and Students With High Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorder: Strategy Considerations for School Counselors

Abiola O. Dipeolu, The University at Buffalo, SUNY, Cassandra Storlie, Kent State University, and Carol Johnson, University of Wisconsin-Stout

 

Abstract

There are limited school counseling resources that address the unique post high school transition issues faced by students with High-functioning Autism Spectrum Disorder (HASD). While many school counselors have excellent skills in assessment, advising, and career planning, it is worthwhile to expand these to include working with students with disabilities, particularly those diagnosed with HASD. The purpose of this article is to build a deeper understanding of the challenges faced by students with HASD and to provide school counselors with strategies to assist these students with school to college transitions.

 

Citation

Dipeolu, A. O., Storlie, C., & Johnson, C. (2014). Transition to college and students with high functioning autism spectrum disorder: Strategy considerations for school counselors. Journal of School Counseling, 12(11). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v12n11.pdf

 

Type of Article

Innovative Methods

 

Volume 12, Number 12:

 

A Comparison of Self-Monitoring With and Without Reinforcement to Improve On-Task Classroom Behavior

Tonya N. Davis, Sharon Dacus, Jenna Bankhead, Megan Haupert, Lisa Fuentes, and Tamara Zoch, Baylor University, Soyeon Kang, The University of Texas at Austin, Shanna Attai, Baylor University, and Russell Lang, Texas State University-San Marcos, Clinic for Autism Research Evaluation and Support

 

Abstract

In this study we analyzed the effects of a self-monitoring and self-monitoring plus reinforcement intervention on classroom behavior. A typically-developing high school student demonstrating difficulty staying on-task during classroom instruction was observed in three classroom settings associated with high levels of off-task behavior. During baseline, the participant was observed during typical classroom activities. Next, the participant was taught to self-monitor his on-task classroom behavior, but no additional reinforcement was provided. Finally, self-monitoring plus reinforcement was implemented, in which tangible reinforcement was provided for on-task behavior. A multiple baseline across settings design was implemented. Findings suggest that only the self-monitoring plus reinforcement intervention had a marked effect on on-task behavior.

 

Citation

Davis, T. N., Dacus, S., Bankhead, J., Haupert, M., Fuentes, L., Zoch, T., ... Lang, R. (2014). A comparison of self-monitoring with and without reinforcement to improve on-task classroom behavior. Journal of School Counseling, 12(12). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v12n12.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 12, Number 13:

 

Professional School Counseling Evaluation Rubric: Advocating for the Profession Through Awareness and Accountability

Carrie A. Wachter Morris and Christopher D. Slaten, Purdue University

 

Abstract

Professional school counselors have been advocating for their role as counselors in the schools for decades (Galassi & Akos, 2007; Gysbers, 2002; Slaten & Baskin, 2013). Although researchers have addressed this concern through advocacy in service and writing, school counselors continue to perform a significant amount of non-counseling activities. In this paper, we address one potential solution to this ongoing problem: the evaluation of school counselors. Currently, most school counselors are evaluated by school building administrators based on teaching standards. The author will introduce a protocol for administrators to utilize that is based on school counseling activities.

 

Citation

Morris, C. A. W., & Slaten, C. D. (2014). Professional school counseling evaluation rubric: Advocating for the profession through awareness and accountability. Journal of School Counseling, 12(13). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v12n13.pdf

 

Type of Article

Professional Development

 

Volume 12, Number 14:

 

Adlerian Adventure-Based Counseling to Enhance Self-Esteem in School Children

Holly H. Wagner, University of Missouri – Saint Louis, and Anna Elliott, Pocatello, Idaho

 

Abstract

This article provides a rationale for using adventure-based counseling (ABC) principles to promote children's self-esteem through group work within the school setting. The effectiveness of combining Adlerian theory with ABC to promote self-esteem is established. The process that would allow a school counselor to plan, organize, facilitate, and evaluate this group successfully is emphasized. Previous literature (Wick, Wick, & Peterson, 1997) conceptualized the efficacy of combining Adlerian theory with ABC based interventions in school. This article expands upon this idea to rationalize the heightened need for this type of intervention in an era of increased interaction through technology and decreased opportunities for developmental social learning. Discussion includes recruiting counselees, forming objectives and intended outcomes, and designing a program within the school. This article includes a selection of activities and initiatives and suggested evaluative measures.

 

Citation

Wagner, H. H., & Elliott, A. (2014). Adlerian adventure-based counseling to enhance self-esteem in school children. Journal of School Counseling, 12(15). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v12n15.pdf

 

Type of Article

Innovative Methods

 

Volume 12, Number 15:

 

School Counselors’ Use of Solution-Focused Tenets and Techniques in School-based Site Supervision

Dawnette L. Cigrand, Winona State University, and Susannah M. Wood and David Duys, University of Iowa

 

Abstract

The tenets and techniques of solution-focused (SF) theory have potential for application to school counseling site supervision; however, research on the use of these practices in site supervision is needed. This study examined the extent to which school counseling site supervisors integrated SF tenets and techniques into their supervisory practices. Researchers surveyed 74 school counselors across the United States to identify which SF techniques were used by school counselors in supervision, and to determine if the tenets of SF were evident in their supervision work. Results indicate that school counselors do agree with basic SF tenets and are already using SF techniques in site supervision of interns. Implications for research, training and practice are discussed.

 

Citation

Cigrand, D. L., Wood, S. M., & Duys, D. (2014). School counselors’ use of solution-focused tenets and techniques in school-based site supervision. Journal of School Counseling, 12(15). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v12n15.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 12, Number 16:

 

Abandoning Colorblind Practice in School Counseling

Lance C. Smith and Anne M. Geroski, University of Vermont, and Katie B. Tyler, Shelburne, Vermont

 

Abstract

Drawing from three case vignettes and the extant literature, the authors seek to identify, problematize, and expand the discussion on colorblind approaches to diversity within the practice of school counseling. The authors discuss how such an approach to working with students from under-represented groups subtly blames the victim, limits the development of equity by positioning critical dialogues as counter-productive, and inhibits the understanding of within-group differences. The article concludes with suggestions for how school counselors can enhance the services they provide to students of various social locations by abandoning colorblind practices and choosing to remove their difference blindfolds.

 

Citation

Smith, L. C., Geroski, A. M., & Tyler, K. B. (2014). Abandoning colorblind practice in school counseling. Journal of School Counseling, 12(16). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v12n16.pdf

 

Type of Article

Current Issues

 

Volume 12, Number 17:

 

Get Fit for Life: Elementary School Group Counseling with a Twist

Sarah I. Springer, Montclair State University

 

Abstract

A significant number of elementary school-aged children participate in some form of athletic activity. As they become pre-teens, the percentage of these children involved in sports lessens, especially as children begin to recognize differences in athletic abilities. Research assessing youth sports suggests that adults and peers can increase children’s levels of motivation to participate in athletics by providing a climate that prioritizes social and emotional development. This article details a psychoeducation group designed by an elementary school counselor to encourage the integration of physical fitness and mental health initiatives that support a healthy lifestyle.

 

Citation

Springer, S. I. (2014). Get fit for life: Elementary school group counseling with a twist. Journal of School Counseling, 12(17). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v12n17.pdf

 

Type of Article

Innovative Methods

 

Volume 12, Number 18:

 

A Psychoeducational Group for Parents of Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Adolescents

Omar A. Troutman and Kathy M. Evans, University of South Carolina

 

Abstract

While literature abounds on the experience of the adolescent in the ‘coming out’ process and the impact that the event has on the family system, few interventions that are designed specifically to assist parents have been proposed. Parents of lesbian, gay, and bisexual adolescents face challenges that they may never have anticipated and, therefore, require special kinds of support resources as well as factual, nonbiased information. A parent-specific psychoeducational group intervention to be facilitated by school counselors is presented with a focus on adult development in the context of a changing family.

 

Citation

Troutman, O. A., & Evans, K. M. (2014). A psychoeducational group for parents of lesbian, gay, and bisexual adolescents. Journal of School Counseling, 12(18). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v12n18.pdf

 

Type of Article

Innovative Methods

 

Volume 12, Number 19:

 

A Qualitative Inquiry of International Adoptees in Schools

Chloe Lancaster and Donnalin C. L. Constantin, University of Memphis

 

Abstract

The purpose of this pilot study was to explore families of international adoption experiences within the schools. Qualitative methodology and grounded theory procedures were used to analyze data collected from semi-structured interviews conducted with three mothers who had adopted 8 children from orphanages in China. The concept of lack of structural support within schools emerged as the central organizing theme emblematic of mothers’ experiences as they each struggled to obtain supportive educational environments for their post-institutional children. Implications for school counseling practices are discussed.

 

Citation

Lancaster, C. & Constantin, D. C. L. (2014). A qualitative inquiry of international adoptees in schools. Journal of School Counseling, 12(19). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v12n19.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 12, Number 20:

 

Exploring the Needs of Students Experiencing Homelessness From School Counselors’ Perspectives

Stacey A. Havlik, Jennifer Brady, and Kathleen Gavin, Villanova University

 

Abstract

An increased understanding of the needs of students experiencing homelessness will better inform educational and clinical practices to ensure student success. Through an analysis of survey data using the Knowledge and Skills with Homeless Students Survey (Gaenzle & Bryan, 2013), this exploratory study applied a mixed methods approach to assess school counselors’ (N = 160) perceptions of the needs of students experiencing homelessness. Thematic analysis of the survey data indicated the existence of four dynamic and interrelated themes of student needs as well as differences in reported needs by school counselors’ school level and location.

 

Citation

Havlik, S. A., Brady, J., & Gavin, K. (2014). Exploring the needs of students experiencing homelessness from school counselors’ perspectives. Journal of School Counseling, 12(20). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v12n20.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 12, Number 21:

 

Youth Participatory Action Research and School Counseling Practice: A School-Wide Framework for Student Well-Being

Laura Smith, Katharine Beck, Erinn Bernstein, and Pasha Dashtguard, Teachers College, Columbia University

 

Abstract

The professional school counseling literature has proposed innovative frameworks for practice including social justice/multicultural approaches, school-wide counseling initiatives, and school-community partnerships. In this article, we propose a programmatic intervention that can be a vehicle for all three: the implementation of school-based youth participatory action research (YPAR). In this article, we profile the use of YPAR in schools, link it to components of school counseling, and identify obstacles in the initiation of YPAR by school counselors.

 

Citation

Smith, L., Beck, K, Bernstein, E., & Dashtguard, P. (2014). Youth participatory action research and school counseling practice: A school-wide framework for student well-being. Journal of School Counseling, 12(21). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v12n21.pdf

 

Type of Article

Innovative Methods

 

Volume 12, Number 22:

 

Assessing the Impact of a School-Based Group Approach With Adolescent Males

T. Michael Liddell and Sharon Robinson Kurpius, Arizona State University

 

Abstract

This study assessed the impact of a school-based group intervention, The Council for Boys and Young Men, specifically designed for adolescent males. The participants who attended an alternative school in a metropolitan area were randomly assigned to the intervention or to waitlist control groups. Measures assessed self-esteem, future and school-related self-efficacy, masculine identity ideology, identity distress, and relational aggression. Participants in The Council intervention group showed significant increases in school and future self-efficacy from pre- to post-test. For all boys at pre-test, higher scores on stereotypical masculine ideology were related to more relational aggression and lower self-esteem.

 

Citation

Liddell, T. M. & Robinson Kurpius, S. (2014). Assessing the impact of a school-based group approach with adolescent males. Journal of School Counseling, 12(22). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v12n22.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 12, Number 23:

 

Integrating Physical Activity, Coach Collaboration, and Life Skill Development in Youth: School Counselors’ Perceptions

Laura Hayden, Amy Cook, Alexandra Scherer, Scott Greenspan, Meghan Ray Silva, Melanie Cadet, and Erik Maki, University of Massachusetts Boston

 

Abstract

Given the social, emotional, and academic benefits of physical activity related to youth development (Hellison, 2011), coupled with the minimal research regarding how school counselors can use physical activity for life skill development, this article focuses on school counselors’ beliefs about collaborating with coaches and using physical activity to develop life skills. In surveying 338 school counselors, we found support for collaborating with coaches and using physical activity to develop life skills, in addition to interest in training opportunities for school counselors to integrate physical activity into their job. Implications for school counselors, coaches, and other stakeholders are provided.

 

Citation

Hayden, L., Cook, A., Scherer, A, Greenspan, S., Silva, M. R., Cadet, M., & Maki, E. (2014). Integrating physical activity, coach collaboration, and life skill development in youth: School counselors’ perceptions. Journal of School Counseling, 12(23). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v12n23.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

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