Journal of School Counseling

ARTICLES

2019

 

JSC Home

Articles

Editorial Board

Guidelines for Authors

Guidelines for Reviewers

Archives

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

---

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

---

2016

2017

2018

 

Google
WWW JSC

The articles published in JSC are indexed in ERIC (Education Resources Information Center).

 

2019

Volume 17, Number 1:

 

An Exploration of Supervision Training Opportunities for School Counselors

Leslie Neyland-Brown, Wright State University, John M. Laux and Jennifer L. Reynolds, The University of Toledo, Kelly Kozlowski, Walden University, and Nick J. Piazza, The University of Toledo

 

Abstract

The Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (2016) and the American School Counselor Association (2016) require supervisors to have “relevant” training in supervision, but do not specify the type of training that should be acquired. This study determines if site supervisors who have had formal training in supervision, as indicated by graduate coursework, report higher self-efficacy and receive higher ratings on evaluations from school counseling internship students than site supervisors who have not. We found no effect of supervision training on school counselor interns’ (n = 60) supervisor ratings using the Student Counselor Evaluation of Supervisor form (Boylan, Malley, & Reilly, 2001). Supervisors (n = 58) who had training (e.g., in-services, continuing education, modules of graduate coursework, university workshop) rated themselves higher on the Site Supervisor Self-Efficacy Survey (DeKruyf & Pehrsson, 2011) than supervisors who had no training and those who completed a graduate supervision course.

 

Citation

Neyland-Brown, L., Laux, J. M., Reynolds, J. L., Kozlowski, K., & Piazza, N. J. (2019). An exploration of supervision training opportunities for school counselors. Journal of School Counseling, 17(1). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v17n1.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 17, Number 2:

 

School Counselors Promoting College and Career Readiness for High School Students

Allison C. Paolini, Winthrop University

 

Abstract

This article describes the pivotal role that school counselors play in preparing and helping students feel prepared and equipped to enter the workforce upon graduation. This brief commentary addresses the necessity for school counselors to work collaboratively with their students, so they are knowledgeable about college and career exploration. In addition, best practices that provide students with the insight, tools, and resources necessary to succeed in the workforce after graduation are presented.

 

Citation

Paolini, A. C. (2019). School counselors promoting college and career readiness for high school students. Journal of School Counseling, 17(2). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v17n2.pdf

 

Type of Article

Current Issues

 

Volume 17, Number 3:

 

A Content Analysis of School Counselors’ Legal Experiences Through Self-Reflective Letter Writing

Daniel A. DeCino, University of South Dakota, Phillip L. Waalkes, University of Missouri- St. Louis, and W. Bradley McKibben, Nova Southeastern University

 

Abstract

School counselors can write letters to themselves to practice self-reflection and enhance learning from experience. Using inductive and deductive content analysis, we analyzed how twelve school counselors used letters to themselves to reflect on their legal experiences. In their letters, participants demonstrated a wide range of depth in dimensions of self-reflection. Implications for future and current school counselors’ self-reflective practices are provided.

 

Citation

DeCino, D. A., Waalkes, P. L., & McKibben, W. B. (2019). A content analysis of school counselors’ legal experiences through self-reflective letter writing. Journal of School Counseling, 17(3). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v17n3.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 17, Number 4:

 

The Role of School Counselors in Supporting Mental Health Models in Schools

Dakota L. King-White, Cleveland State University

 

Abstract

Many K-12 students face mental health challenges that affect them academically, socially, and emotionally. These challenges include anxiety, depression, trauma, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. While research on mental health models in school settings exists, specific attention has not been given to the role of school counselors in supporting mental health models in schools (Lynn, McKay McKernan, & Atkins, 2003; Mellin et al., 2010; Messina, Kolbert, Hyatt-Burkhart, & Crothers, 2015; Splett & Maras, 2011). This article explores strategies that school counselors can use to support mental health models within the K-12 academic setting.

 

Citation

King-White, D. L. (2019). The role of school counselors in supporting mental health models in schools. Journal of School Counseling, 17(4). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v17n4.pdf

 

Type of Article

Current Issues

 

Volume 17, Number 5:

 

LGBT Families and School Community Partnerships: A Critical Role for School Counselors

Matthew J. Beck, Western Illinois University-Quad Cities, and Haley D. Wikoff, University of Iowa

 

Abstract

School-family-community partnerships are associated with positive educational outcomes for students and families. However, there are limited interventions available to assist school counselors in building effective school-family-community relationships with lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender parents/guardians and their children. This article outlines strategies that school counselors can implement to enhance the partnerships between school communities and LGBT-headed families across the student, school, and community levels.

 

Citation

Beck, M. J., & Wikoff, H. D. (2019). LGBT families and school community partnerships: A critical role for school counselors. Journal of School Counseling, 17(5). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v17n5.pdf

 

Type of Article

Innovative Methods

 

Volume 17, Number 6:

 

Exploring the Impact of a Positive Psychology Intervention with Latina/o Adolescents

Javier Cavazos Vela, Christian Garcia, and James Whittenberg, University of Texas Rio Grande Valley, James Ikonomopoulos, Texas A&M University-Kingsville, and Stacey L. Gonzalez, Brownsville, TX

 

Abstract

Latina/o adolescents may begin middle school with lower levels of life satisfaction, hope, and self-compassion. In the current study, a small-series (N = 5) single-case research design was implemented to evaluate the impact of a positive psychology group counseling experience to increase Latina/o adolescents’ life satisfaction, hope, and self-compassion. Analysis of participants’ scores on outcome measures yielded treatment effects indicating that the positive psychology group counseling experience may be effective for increasing hope, life satisfaction, and self-compassion. Given that the positive psychology approach was a promising approach for improving Latina/o adolescents’ positive outcomes, implications for school counselors to integrate positive psychology into treatment processes are presented.

 

Citation

Vela, J. C., Garcia, C., Whittenberg, J., Ikonomopoulos, J., & Gonzalez, S. L. (2019). Exploring the impact of a positive psychology intervention with Latina/o adolescents. Journal of School Counseling, 17(6). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v17n6.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 17, Number 7:

 

Lessons Learned From an Inner-City Boys Trauma Group

Jason D. Reynolds (Taewon Choi), Seton Hall University, Joshua M. Henderson, St. Barnabas Hospital, and Amelio A. D’Onofrio, Fordham University

 

Abstract

This article describes a study of two male clinicians’ implementation of a 10-week, school-based integrated cognitive-behavioral group counseling intervention with psychodynamic process elements at a school in the Bronx, NY for inner-city middle school boys who have experienced complex trauma. The authors define complex trauma and describe the therapeutic concepts that framed their work with students over the course of an academic year. Through case study methodology, the authors offer lessons learned about a pilot intervention treating complex trauma in an underserved inner-city school through their observations, clinical notes, and clinical supervision. Suggestions are provided to counselors for cultivating a therapeutic space amid the often disruptive environment of middle school, with special emphasis on how counselors may develop trust and may increase resiliency for middle school boys within interpersonally aggressive academic environments and inner-city neighborhoods.

 

Citation

Reynolds J. D., Henderson, J. M., & D’Onofrio, A. A. (2019). Lessons learned from an inner-city boys trauma group. Journal of School Counseling, 17(7). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v17n7.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 17, Number 8:

 

Promoting Girls’ Leadership Development in Secondary Schools

Cheryl L. Fulton, Jennifer H. Greene, Elizabeth Kjellstrand Hartwig, Sarah M. Blalock, and Maria Haiyasoso, Texas State University

 

Abstract

Leadership programs and services have burgeoned over the past decade to encourage greater representation in leadership among girls and teens. Yet, little is known about the prevalence and type of girls’ leadership programs or services adopted in secondary schools, whether they are perceived as important or effective by school counselors, or what barriers exist to prevent adoption of such programs. Based on an online survey of 239 school counselors, we explored the promotion of girls’ leadership within the education system. We also offered implications for girls’ leadership promotion in the schools and suggestions for future research.

 

Citation

Fulton, C. L., Greene, J. H., Hartwig, E. K., Blalock, S. M., & Haiyasoso, M. (2019). Promoting girls’ leadership development in secondary schools. Journal of School Counseling, 17(8). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v17n8.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 17, Number 9:

 

Exploring How School Counselors Practice Self-Compassion

Anjanette Todd, University of Texas at El Paso, and Hiba Chehaib, University of South Florida

 

Abstract

Providing compassionate care is of utmost importance when school counselors serve students, especially in times of crisis. School counselors should practice self-compassion in order to be compassionate toward others, which they may find challenging. This challenge could be caused by occupational stressors such as limited opportunities for clinical supervision, high student-counselor ratios, and a lack of clearly defined job roles. This article describes a study wherein seven school counselors explored aspects of self-compassionate behavior (Todd, 2017). A thematic analysis was used to analyze the data and identify themes. Results indicated that all seven school counselors integrated self-compassionate behaviors. Themes included: (a) perspectives related to self-compassion, (b) actions related to self-compassion, and (c) resistance in recognizing self-compassion. Based on the results of this study, an enhanced understanding of the role that self-compassion has among counselors in relation to well-being was explored.

 

Citation

Todd, A., & Chehaib, H. (2019). Exploring how school counselors practice self-compassion. Journal of School Counseling, 17(9). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v17n9.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 17, Number 10:

 

Advising High School Students for Admission to College Fine Arts Programs

Jeff Cranmore, Grand Canyon University, Susan D. Adams-Johnson, University of Oklahoma, Joel Wiley, University of North Texas, and Anna Holloway, Langston University

 

Abstract

School counselors are a primary source of college and career information for students and families, including students interested in pursuing a degree in fine arts. The admission process to fine arts programs can be complex and involve multiple steps; however, providing this guidance is clearly in line with the role of school counselor, as defined by the American School Counselor Association (ASCA) model for school counseling. This article provides a guide for the fine arts admission process, including finding the right fit, academic requirements, financial assistance, and general strategies. Guidance for specific disciplines such as dance, music, theater, and visual arts are provided. The article includes two appendices of resources that counselors may share with students and families.

 

Citation

Cranmore, J., Adams-Johnson, S. D., Wiley, J., & Holloway, A. (2019). Advising high school students for admission to college fine arts programs. Journal of School Counseling, 17(10). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v17n10.pdf

 

Type of Article

Innovative Methods

 

Volume 17, Number 11:

 

Exploration of Institutional Theory in One California Central District Office That Shapes College Preparedness and Enrollment

Vernell L. Deslonde, Fontana, California, and Michael D. Becerra, Dallas, Texas

 

Abstract

To impact college enrollment rates, and subsequently college attainment throughout the United States, particularly among low socioeconomic status students, college enrollment outcomes must become a priority at the state, district, and school levels. Central school district offices across the United States face demands by educators and policymakers to ensure that students are prepared for college. The way in which central district offices respond will likely be influenced by the availability of resources. Drawing on institutional theory, this exploratory case study examines how one central district office’s funding practices and resource allocations influence college preparedness and enrollment in California. The researchers interviewed central district leaders and high school administrators (N = 10) to explore their perceptions of financial strategies and barriers that impact college preparation and enrollment rates, particularly in California, a state that ranks 40th in college enrollment. The analysis illustrates the resource challenges from the perspective of school administrators that interfere with preparing students for college, such as a limited authority to use site-level funds to hire qualified teachers to meet the instructional needs of their students. Further findings revealed that despite fiscal resources dedicated from this central district office to remove funding barriers that typically interfere with low-income and minority students’ access to college, districts must move beyond the core curriculum to ensure that students are ready for college.

 

Citation

Deslonde, V. L., & Becerra, M. D. (2019). Exploration of institutional theory in one California central district office that shapes college preparedness and enrollment. Journal of School Counseling, 17(11). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v17n11.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 17, Number 12:

 

Factors Associated With Programmatic Orientation and Supervision in Schools

Mariama Cook Sandifer, Prairie View A&M University, and Dottie Martin, Lillian M. Range, and Thomas Fonseca, University of Holy Cross

 

Abstract

Programmatic orientation is the level of intentional implementation of school counseling program components that are based on data and are proactive in nature. To explore relationships between school counselor supervision and programmatic orientation, 188 school counselors answered questions regarding the presence of supervision elements and programmatic orientation levels. Results indicated that higher levels of programmatic orientation were associated with higher presence of supervision elements.

 

Citation

Sandifer, M. C., Martin, D., Range, L. M., & Fonseca, T. (2019). Factors associated with programmatic orientation and supervision in schools. Journal of School Counseling, 17(12). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v17n12.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 17, Number 13:

 

The Influence of Personal and Professional Characteristics on School Counselors’ Recognition and Reporting of Child Sexual Abuse

Richard Joseph Behun, Millersville University, Julie A. Cerrito, The University of Scranton, and David L. Delmonico and Jered B. Kolbert, Duquesne University

 

Abstract

This study investigated personal and professional predictors of professional school counselors’ (N = 220) accurate recognition and appropriate reporting of child sexual abuse. Additionally, this study examined instances when school counselors suspected child sexual abuse but intentionally elected not to report it and explored considerations that were influential in the decision-making process. Results indicated that personal and professional characteristics of the school counselor did not predict recognition and appropriate reporting of child sexual abuse but did contribute to the decision-making process when deciding to make a mandated report.

 

Citation

Behun, R. J., Cerrito, J. A., Delmonico, D. L., & Kolbert, J. B. (2019). The influence of personal and professional characteristics on school counselors’ recognition and reporting of child sexual abuse. Journal of School Counseling, 17(13). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v17n13.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 17, Number 14:

 

School Counselor Site Supervisors’ Perceptions of Preparedness and Training Needs

Grace W. Wambu, New Jersey City University, and Charles E. Myers, Eastern Kentucky University

 

Abstract

The importance of school counselor site supervisor training has gained considerable attention in the past couple of years; however, despite these efforts, little progress seems to have been made. This study explores school counselor site supervisors’ perceptions of preparedness, training needs, and preferred methods of future training. Results of the study revealed that most participants did not receive supervision training during their graduate program preparation. Implications for training site supervisors and future research are discussed.

 

Citation

Wambu, G. W., & Myers, C. E. (2019). School counselor site supervisors’ perceptions of preparedness and training needs. Journal of School Counseling, 17(14). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v17n14.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 17, Number 15:

 

Stay-at-Home Dads’ Experiences With Their Children’s Elementary Schools

Eric S. Davis, Jennifer Wolgemuth, and Steven Haberlin, University of South Florida, Vernon S. Smith, Monmouth University, and Sharlene Smith, Piscataway, New Jersey

 

Abstract

The role of fathers in elementary education has shifted drastically in recent years. In particular, stay-at-home dads (SAHDs) have become more relevant in the lives of children. Despite these changes, there remains a paucity of research on SAHDs’ experiences with their children’s schools. This qualitative study examined SAHDs’ perceptions of and experiences with their children’s schools. The research identified three themes: (a) involvement, (b) interactions, and (c) communication. The researchers discuss implications for elementary school counseling practice as well as future areas of research.

 

Citation

Davis, E. S., Wolgemuth, J., Haberlin, S., Smith, V. S., & Smith, S. (2019). Stay-at-home dads’ experiences with their children’s elementary schools. Journal of School Counseling, 17(15). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v17n15.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 17, Number 16:

 

Trends and Influential Factors in Child Abuse Reporting: Implications for Early Career School Counselors

Lacey Ricks, Liberty University, Malti Tuttle, Auburn University, and Christy Land and Julia Chibbaro, University of West Georgia

 

Abstract

This study used quantitative measures to explore child abuse reporting trends for early career school counselors and to examine factors influencing their decisions to report suspected child abuse. Thematic coding was used to analyze recommendations for additional training needs regarding child abuse reporting and for the challenges school counselors faced regarding mandated reporting. Participants completed online surveys to assess their experiences. Factors found to influence school counselors’ decisions to report suspected child abuse included school counselors’ self-efficacy levels, academic setting, and students’ participation in the schools’ free or reduced lunch program. Qualitative results were also reviewed.

 

Citation

Ricks, L., Tuttle, M., Land, C., & Chibbaro, J. (2019). Trends and influential factors in child abuse reporting: Implications for early career school counselors. Journal of School Counseling, 17(16). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v17n16.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 17, Number 17:

 

School Counselors’ Experiences and Practices of Working With Adolescents Who Self-Harm

Ellen A. Roberts, Joan K. Comeau and Kathryn W. Van Asselt, Capella University, and Heather C. Trepal, University of Texas at San Antonio

 

Abstract

This study utilized qualitative methodology to provide a rich description and a deeper understanding of the professional experiences and practices of twelve school counselors who work with adolescent students who self-harm. Four themes included: suicidal or non-suicidal, role of the school counselor, referrals, and identified interventions. There is a need for school counselors to gain more training and knowledge regarding effective interventions that are appropriate to use with adolescents who self-injure in the school setting.

 

Citation

Roberts, E. A., Comeau, J. K., Van Asselt, K. W., & Trepal, H. C. (2019). School counselors’ experiences and practices of working with adolescents who self-harm. Journal of School Counseling, 17(17). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v17n17.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 17, Number 18:

 

The Impact of Child Maltreatment on the Educational and Psychological Well-Being of Students

Jonathan Chitiyo, University of Pittsburgh at Bradford, and Zachary Pietrantoni, California State University at East Bay

 

Abstract

Child maltreatment continues to be a major health and social welfare problem across the globe. In the United States, millions of children from all socioeconomic backgrounds, across all ages, religions, and cultures are victims of child maltreatment every day and millions more are at risk. Research has consistently shown that exposure to child maltreatment in all its forms negatively affects the current and future educational performance and emotional and psychological well-being of children. The purpose of this paper is to provide a literature synthesis of the impact of child maltreatment on the educational and psychological well-being of students. Recommendations for educators working in school settings are provided.

 

Citation

Chitiyo, J., & Pietrantoni, Z. (2019). The impact of child maltreatment on the educational and psychological well-being of students. Journal of School Counseling, 17(18). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v17n18.pdf

 

Type of Article

Current Issues

 

Volume 17, Number 19:

 

School Counselors Use of Social Emotional Learning in High School: A Study of the Strong Teens Curriculum

Paul Caldarella, Austin J. Millet, Melissa A. Heath, Jared S. Warren, and Leslie Williams, Brigham Young University

 

Abstract

Student mental health problems often emerge in high school; however, such problems frequently go unaddressed. Using a time series design, we evaluated the effects of the Strong Teens social-emotional learning curriculum implemented by three school counselors and two school social workers with 28 high school students identified with internalizing symptoms. Decreases in students’ self-reported levels of internalizing symptoms were statistically significant following the 12-week intervention, indicating moderate improvement. Participants rated the program as socially valid, though they also recommended ways to improve it. Results coincide with past studies indicating that Strong Teens may help reduce adolescents’ self-reported internalizing symptoms.

 

Citation

Caldarella, P., Millet, A. J., Heath, M. A., Warren, J. S., & Williams, L. (2019). School counselors use of social emotional learning in high school: A study of the Strong Teens curriculum. Journal of School Counseling, 17(19). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v17n19.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 17, Number 20:

 

Integrating Wellness Within Group Counseling for Latinx Adolescents

Javier Cavazos Vela, University of Texas Rio Grande Valley, James Ikonomopoulos, Texas A&M University-Kingsville, Christian Garcia and James Whittenberg, University of Texas Rio Grande Valley, and Stacey Lee Gonzalez, Texas A&M University-Kingsville

 

Abstract

Latinx adolescents may begin middle school with lower levels of life satisfaction and hope. In the current study, we implemented a small-series (N = 4) single-case research design to evaluate the impact of a group counseling wellness experience to increase Latinx adolescents’ life satisfaction and hope. Analysis of participants’ scores on outcome measures yielded treatment effects indicating that the group counseling wellness experience may be effective for increasing hope and life satisfaction. Implications for school counselors are provided.

 

Citation

Vela, J. C., Ikonomopoulos, J., Garcia, C., Whittenberg, J., & Gonzalez, S. L. (2019). Integrating wellness within group counseling for Latinx adolescents. Journal of School Counseling, 17(20). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v17n20.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 17, Number 21:

 

Substance Use Disorders: What School Counselors Should Know

Edward T. Dunbar Jr., Mark D. Nelson, and Dawn S. Tarabochia

 

Abstract

Substance use among school-aged young people is of concern as it relates to student success. School counselors have an opportunity to prevent, educate, and counsel students about substance use. Various models of school counseling, including the ASCA National Model, have encouraged the development of competency-based programs that help students succeed in school and in life. In an effort to inform school counselors, ASCA has developed position statements related to substance abuse. School counselors have reported difficulties in identifying students with substance use issues, working effectively with these students, and developing or teaching curricula associated with substance use. School counselors may benefit from additional training on substance abuse as well as from models that the emphasize student well-being and success. The purpose of this article is to provide school counselors strategies for addressing students’ substance use. The PACES model of student well-being is used to illustrate the influence of substance use on students’ well-being and provide school counselors a framework from which to evaluate, educate, and counsel students regarding substance use.

 

Citation

Dunbar, E. T., Jr., Nelson, M. D., & Tarabochia, D. S. (2019). Substance use disorders: What school counselors should know. Journal of School Counseling, 17(21). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v17n21.pdf

 

Type of Article

Current Issues

 

Volume 17, Number 22:

 

Digital Awareness: A Model for School Counselors

Julia S. Chibbaro, University of West Georgia, Lacey Ricks, Liberty University, and Bethany Lanier, University of West Georgia

 

Abstract

As the integration of technology into schools is becoming prevalent, school counselors and educators must work together to identify students who may be suffering from digital addiction. As a student advocate and leader within their schools, school counselors are in an optimal position to educate school staff, students, and community members on the signs and symptoms, dangers, and treatments of digital addiction. Early identification of digital addiction is essential for the wellbeing of all students.

 

Citation

Chibbaro, J. S., Ricks, L., & Lanier, B. (2019). Digital awareness: A model for school counselors. Journal of School Counseling, 17(22). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v17n22.pdf

 

Type of Article

Current Issues