Journal of School Counseling

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The articles published in JSC are indexed in ERIC (Education Resources Information Center).

 

2014

Volume 12, Number 1:

 

An Ethics Challenge for School Counselors: Part 2

Janet G. Froeschle Hicks, Nicole Noble, Steve Berry, Steve Talbert, Charles Crews, and Jiaqi Li, Texas Tech University, and Yvette Castillo, West Texas A&M University

 

Abstract

Ethical and legal issues are dealt with daily by school counselors (Bodenhorn, 2006; Moyer, Sullivan & Growcock, 2012). Despite the prevalence of these issues, few resources exist to assist these professionals when making ethical and legal decisions. In addition, a lack of supervision for school counselors and managing complexities inherent when working with minors creates a need for continuous training (Moyer, Sullivan, & Growcock, 2012; Remley & Herlihy, 2007). As a result, this article intends to assist school counselors in making proper ethical and legal decisions. Each ethical dilemma is described via a quiz format to further ethical knowledge and discussion. Real cases, as submitted by school counselors, are described and followed by suggestions as based on ethical codes.

 

Citation

Hicks, J. G. F., Noble, N., Berry, S., Talbert, S., Crews, C., Li, J., & Castillo, Y. (2014). An Ethics Challenge for School Counselors: Part 2. Journal of School Counseling, 12(1). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v12n1.pdf

 

Type of Article

Current Issues

 

Volume 12, Number 2:

 

My Name Is Not Michael: Strategies for Promoting Cultural Responsiveness in Schools

Lisa L. Schulz, Kara Hurt, and Natalya Lindo, University of North Texas

 

Abstract

With the changing cultural demographics in U.S. classrooms, school counselors must develop innovative approaches to promote culturally responsive school climates and organizational change. A vision is offered of systemic cultural responsiveness and culturally relevant teaching practices that nurture and engage all learners. The role of the school counselor in realizing such transformation is described. In this vision, the tenets of advocacy, consultation, collaboration, systemic change, and leadership identified in the ASCA National Model are recognized as the means by which the school counselor can indirectly promote student achievement. This article offers examples of intervention strategies designed to impact the school system, the teaching and learning process, and foster cultural responsiveness. Recommendations for advancing the role of the school counselor are shared.

 

Citation

Schulz, L. L., Hurt, K., & Lindo, N. (2014). My name is not Michael: Strategies for promoting cultural responsiveness in schools. Journal of School Counseling, 12(2). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v12n2.pdf

 

Type of Article

Current Issues

 

Volume 12, Number 3:

 

Perceptions of Preparedness for a Major School Crisis: An Evaluation of Missouri School Counselors

Danilea Werner, Auburn University

 

Abstract

A major school crisis can cause physical and emotional distress as well as impact student academic performance. The purpose of this study was to use a web-based survey to explore Missouri school counselors’ perceptions of individual and school-wide crisis preparedness and crisis training experiences. Results indicate that the more involved school counselors are in the crisis planning process the more prepared they feel. By understanding the differences in school counselor crisis preparedness perception and their involvement in crisis planning, educational institutions can design and target training to increase effectiveness and improve disaster response.

 

Citation

Werner, D. (2014). Perceptions of preparedness for a major school crisis: An evaluation of Missouri school counselors. Journal of School Counseling, 12(3). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v12n3.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 12, Number 4:

 

Where Are We Now? An Updated Review of the School Counseling Literature for Trends and Themes

Adam Zagelbaum, Sonoma State University, Theresa Kruczek and Charlene Alexander, Ball State University, and Hugh Crethar, Oklahoma State University

 

Abstract

The present study is a follow-up to an earlier investigation of themes and trends in school counseling journals. The original study examined articles pre- and post-merger of the American School Counseling Association (ASCA) journal(s) for content reflecting themes evolving from the Education Trust Initiative. This study evaluated literature reflected in the Professional School Counseling (PSC) journal articles since the adoption of the ASCA National Model to assess trends as well as to identify current values and issues in the profession. The results suggest content in professional journals is reflective the ASCA National Model and suggestions are offered regarding future publications.

 

Citation

Zagelbaum, A., Kruczek, T., Alexander, C., & Crethar, H. (2014). Where are we now? An updated review of the school counseling literature for trends and themes. Journal of School Counseling, 12(4). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v12n4.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 12, Number 5:

 

A Phenomenological Study of Urban School Counselors’ Perceptions of Low-Income Families

Rebekah F. Cole, Capella University, and Tim Grothaus, Old Dominion University

 

Abstract

This qualitative, phenomenological study explores urban school counselors’ perceptions of low-income families in their schools. Ten school counselors participated in two rounds of individual interviews and answered two emailed reflective questions. Six themes emerged from the data: (a) perceptions of family characteristics and environment, (b) perceptions of family attitudes and actions regarding education, (c) awareness of obstacles and challenges for families, (d) struggle empathizing with low-income families, (e) choice of roles in working with low-income families, and (f) personal feelings and reflections in response to experiences with low-income families. Implications for school counselors, supervisors, school counseling district supervisors, school counseling professional organizations, and counselor educators are discussed.

 

Citation

Cole, R. F., & Grothaus, T. (2014). A phenomenological study of urban school counselors’ perceptions of low-income families. Journal of School Counseling, 12(5). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v12n5.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 12, Number 6:

 

Spirituality and School Counselor Education and Supervision

Laura L. Gallo, University of Iowa

 

Abstract

Spirituality is an area that has not received a great deal of attention in supervision, yet it can have substantial effects on the counseling process. A definition of spirituality that allows for a variety of worldviews can be useful to both counselor and client as it helps strengthen the counseling relationship and lessen differences between them. In addition, there are counseling models that have been created to integrate the role of spirituality within supervision and to provide a framework for supervisees. Recommendations in how to incorporate spirituality for supervisors to use with school counselors in training are provided.

 

Citation

Gallo, L. L. (2014). Spirituality and school counselor education and supervision. Journal of School Counseling, 12(6). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v12n6.pdf

 

Type of Article

Professional Development

 

Volume 12, Number 7:

 

Bullying Prevention and the Parent Involvement Model

Jered B. Kolbert, Duquesne University, Danielle Schultz, Quaker Valley School District, and Laura M. Crothers, Duquesne University

 

Abstract

A recent meta-analysis of bullying prevention programs provides support for social-ecological theory, in which parent involvement addressing child bullying behaviors is seen as important in preventing school-based bullying. The purpose of this manuscript is to suggest how Epstein and colleagues’ parent involvement model can be used as a framework in implementing bullying prevention programs. School counselors can use the types of parent involvement identified in Epstein and van Voorhis (2010) model, including parenting, communicating, volunteering, learning at home, decision-making, and collaborating with the community, in working with parents and families in the service of promoting anti-bullying interventions and programming in school systems.

 

Citation

Kolbert, J. B., Schultz, D., & Crothers, L. M. (2014). Bullying prevention and the parent involvement model. Journal of School Counseling, 12(7). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v12n7.pdf

 

Type of Article

Innovative Methods

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