Journal of School Counseling

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2011-2015

 

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The articles published in JSC are indexed in ERIC (Education Resources Information Center).

This page lists all articles published from 2011 through 2015.

 
 

2011

Volume 9, Number 1:

 

Role Conflict and Ambiguity as Predictors of Job Satisfaction in High School Counselors

Annemarie Cervoni, High School Counselor, Orchard Park High School, and Janice DeLucia-Waack, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York

Abstract

 

The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between role conflict and role ambiguity, and percentage of time spent on ASCA recommended duties (counseling, coordination, consultation, and large group guidance); and job satisfaction of high school counselors. The Role Conflict and Role Ambiguity Scale and the Job Descriptive Index were administered to 175 high school counselors. Role conflict, role ambiguity, time spent on counseling related duties, time spent on consultation related duties, and time spent on non-ASCA functions were all found to be significant predictors of job satisfaction.

 

Citation

Cervoni, A., & DeLucia-Waack, J. (2011). Role conflict and ambiguity as predictors of job satisfaction in high school counselors. Journal of School Counseling, 9(1). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v9n1.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 9, Number 2:

 

Obstacles and Successes in Implementing the ASCA National Model in School

Jeannine R. Studer, Joel F. Diambra, John A. Breckner, and R. Eric Heidel, University of Tennessee at Knoxville

 

Abstract

Researchers surveyed CACREP school counseling program graduates from a southeastern university to explore successes and barriers in implementing a comprehensive, developmental school counseling program. Findings included significant differences across school levels in programmatic change (p < .001) and responsive services (p = .041). Furthermore, primary/elementary school counselors were significantly different from middle and high school counselors in conducting more guidance lessons and collecting enumerative data (p < .01).

 

Citation

Studer, J. R., Diambra, J. F., Breckner, J. A., & Heidel, R. E. (2011). Obstacles and successes in implementing the ASCA National Model in school. Journal of School Counseling, 9(2). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v9n2.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 9, Number 3:

 

The Role of School Counselors in the Childhood Obesity Epidemic

Yvonne I. Larrier, Michelle A. Bakerson, Jeremy M. Linton, Lynne R. Walker, Indiana University South Bend, and Susan J. Woolford, University of Michigan

 

Abstract

Childhood obesity is a significant public health concern. Since 1960, the prevalence of childhood obesity in the United States increased dramatically from 5% to 16.9%. To date many interventions to address obesity in schools have focused on healthy changes to the content of vending machines, school lunches, and the addition of after school activities to increase physical activity. Absent from the professional literature are research and practice suggestions detailing ways school counselors can confront childhood obesity in school settings. The purpose of this article is to explore roles and interventions that school counselors can employ to address this epidemic.

 

Citation

Larrier, Y. I., Bakerson, M. A., Linton, J. M., Walker, L. R., & Woolford, S. J. (2011). The role of school counselors in the childhood obesity epidemic. Journal of School Counseling, 9(3). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v9n3.pdf

 

Type of Article

Innovative Methods

  

Volume 9, Number 4:

 

Experiences of Adolescents With Type 1 Diabetes as They Transition From Middle School to High School

Katie Fleischman, Melissa K. Smothers, Heidi F. Christianson, Laura Carter, Anthony A. Hains, and W. Hobart Davies, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

 

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to explore the experiences of adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus (T1DM) as they transitioned into high school in order to understand the contextual factors that impact diabetic health-related behaviors and self-identity. A qualitative interviewing methodology called consensual qualitative research (CQR) was used. Six high school freshmen with T1DM were interviewed. Adolescents reported both normative as well as diabetes-specific issues (e.g., social challenges of self-care) pertaining to their transition from middle to high school. Implications for school counseling practice are discussed.

 

Citation

Fleischman, K., Smothers, M. K., Christianson, H. F., Carter, L., Hains, A. A., & Davies, W. H. (2011). Experiences of adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes as they transition from middle school to high school. Journal of School Counseling, 9(4). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v9n4.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 9, Number 5:

 

Effects of Non-Guidance Activities, Supervision, and Student-to-Counselor Ratios on School Counselor Burnout

Michael Moyer, The University of Texas at San Antonio

 

Abstract

School counselors, like all mental health professionals are at high risk for burnout. High caseloads, job role ambiguity, and lack of supervision increase their propensity for burnout. Three areas were selected for study in this article due to their potential impact on burnout: supervision, student-to-counselor-ratios, and non-guidance related duties. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses were conducted and findings indicate non-guidance related duties and supervision are the best predictors of burnout. Implications and limitations are discussed.

 

Citation

Moyer, M. (2011). Effects of non-guidance activities, supervision, and student-to-counselor ratios on school counselor burnout. Journal of School Counseling, 9(5). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v9n5.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 9, Number 6:

 

School Counseling and Solution-focused Site Supervision: A Theoretical Application and Case Example

Dawnette L. Cigrand, Winona State University, and Susannah M. Wood, The University of Iowa

 

Abstract

The solution-focused counseling theory provides a useful framework that can be applied to supervision of counselors-in-training. Solution-focused supervision is especially useful for school counseling site supervisors who may not have much time for supervision, who may not have had much training in clinical supervision, or who may have had different training experiences than their interns. This article delineates the tenets of the solution-focused theory and describes its application to school counseling site supervision and the American School Counselor Association National Model (ASCA, 2005) through a thorough discussion and a case example.

 

Citation

Cigrand, D. L., & Wood, S. M. (2011). School counseling and solution-focused site supervision: A theoretical application and case example. Journal of School Counseling, 9(6). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v9n6.pdf

 

Type of Article

Innovative Methods

 

Volume 9, Number 7:

 

Virtue Ethics in School Counseling: A Framework for Decision Making

Felicia L. Wilczenski, University of Massachusetts Boston, and Amy L. Cook, Mercy College, New York

 

Abstract

Virtue ethics focus on the motives that guide ethical decision making and action, and as such, are critical to the competent application of the counseling profession’s ethical codes. Knowledge of virtue ethics deepens understanding of moral responsibilities and ethical reasoning in professional practice. This paper is an overview of virtue ethics and discusses its relevance for school counselors and counselor educators.

 

Citation

Wilczenski, F. L., & Cook, A. L. (2011). Virtue ethics in school counseling: A framework for decision making. Journal of School Counseling, 9(7). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v9n7.pdf

 

Type of Article

Current Issues

 

Volume 9, Number 8:

 

School Counseling Prevention and Intervention for Child Witnesses of Intimate Partner Violence

Juleen K. Buser, Rider University, and Erin Saponara, The College of New Jersey

 

Abstract

Children who witness intimate partner violence (IPV) often suffer a range of physical, behavioral, emotional, and familial consequences (Holt, Buckley, & Whelan, 2008). School counselors may be in a key position to implement prevention programs around this issue, identify children who have witnessed IPV, and to engage in intervention efforts. Thus, school counselors need increased knowledge about the impact of IPV on child witnesses. In addition to summarizing some research on the impact of IPV on child witnesses, the following article will discuss prevention and intervention efforts which school counselors can utilize to assist students in combating the deleterious effects of witnessing violence in the home.

 

Citation

Buser, J. K., & Saponara, E. (2011). School counseling prevention and intervention for child witnesses of intimate partner violence. Journal of School Counseling, 9(8). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v9n8.pdf

 

Type of Article

Current Issues

 

Volume 9, Number 9:

 

Improving Reading Fluency and Comprehension Among Elementary Students: Evaluation of a School Remedial Reading Program

Robin Hausheer, Alana Hansen, and Diana M. Doumas, Boise State University

 

Abstract

This study examined the effectiveness of a remedial reading program on improving reading fluency and comprehension among elementary school students. Twenty-four students were selected to participate in the 8-month program. Results indicated reading fluency and reading comprehension scores improved significantly across the academic year for both male and female students. Examination of gender differences indicated significantly more males were referred to the program than females. Additionally, examination of the between group effect size indicated reading comprehension scores improved more for males than females. Implications for school counselors are discussed.

 

Citation

Hausheer, R., Hansen, A., & Doumas, D. M. (2011). Improving reading fluency and comprehension among elementary students: Evaluation of a school remedial reading program. Journal of School Counseling, 9(9). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v9n9.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 9, Number 10:

 

School Counselors and Social Justice Advocacy for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Questioning Students

Markus P. Bidell, Hunter College

 

Abstract

Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, or questioning (LGBTQ) students often face considerable isolation, discrimination, and violence at school, which can exacerbate the acute psychosocial and academic problems they already encounter. The purpose of this article is to introduce gay-straight alliances (GSAs) as a social justice and advocacy approach for professional school counselors to support LGBTQ students. GSAs are student-led non-curricular groups that provide support and advocacy for LGBTQ middle and high school students as well as their allies. The history of GSAs and research about these groups will be presented along with resources and recommendations for school counselors to become social justice advocates for their LGBTQ students.

 

Citation

Bidell, M. P. (2011). School counselors and social justice advocacy for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning students. Journal of School Counseling, 9(10). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v9n10.pdf

 

Type of Article

Current Issues

 

Volume 9, Number 11:

 

School Counselor Preparedness: Examining Cultural Competence Regarding Gay, Lesbian, and Bisexual Issues

Steven W. Schmidt, J. Scott Glass, and Pattie Wooten, East Carolina University

 

Abstract

Multiculturalism continues to be a powerful force within the counseling profession. While there appears to be an increase in the awareness of topics related to diversity, there are topics that continue to be underrepresented, particularly with regard to the training of future school counselors. One such topic is that of issues related to gay, lesbian and bisexual clients. This article examines the level of knowledge with regard to GLB clients and issues exhibited by counselor education students pursuing a master’s degree in school counseling.

 

Citation

Schmidt, S. W., Glass, J. S., Wooten, P. (2011). School counselor preparedness: Examining cultural competence regarding gay, lesbian, and bisexual issues. Journal of School Counseling, 9(11). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v9n11.pdf

 

Type of Article

Current Issues

 

Volume 9, Number 12:

 

Putting Research into Practice in School Violence Prevention & Intervention: How Is School Counseling Doing?

Charles McAdams, M. Ann Shillingford, and Shannon Trice-Black, The College of William and Mary

 

Abstract

This article reports the findings of a national survey of practicing school counselors regarding their knowledge of current research in school violence prevention and intervention. The authors describe four active areas of youth violence research over the past two decades and present findings that suggest that a potentially dangerous gap may exist between research advances and their incorporation into the day-to-day practice of school counselors in the United States. Implications of the findings are considered along with strategies for bridging the research-to-practice gap as recommended by the school counselors themselves.

 

Citation

McAdams, C., Shillingford, M. A., & Trice-Black, S. (2011). Putting research into practice in school violence prevention & intervention: How is school counseling doing? Journal of School Counseling, 9(12). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v9n12.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 9, Number 13:

 

An Exploratory Study in School Counselor Consultation Engagement

Dilani M. Perera-Diltz, Cleveland State University, Jeffry L. Moe, University of Houston-Victoria, and Kimberly L. Mason, University of New Orleans

 

Abstract

Consultation, an indirect school counselor service, is provided by 79% (n = 998) school counselor currently. Most frequently consultation occurs with teachers, parents, and principals. MANOVA and post hoc analysis indicate differences in consultation practices across academic levels. Choosing a consultation model based on the type of service recipient (i.e., administration, faculty, parents, other mental health professionals) may improve the benefits of this common school counselor service. Future directions for research and limitations of the study are provided.

 

Citation

Perera-Diltz, D. M., Moe, J. L., & Mason, K. L. (2011). An exploratory study in school counselor consultation engagement. Journal of School Counseling, 9(13). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v9n13.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 9, Number 14:

 

Meeting the Guidance and Counseling Needs of Gifted Students in School Settings

Karen Elijah, Crawfordsville, IN

 

Abstract

A practicing school counselor discusses the necessity of providing specialized guidance and counseling services for gifted and talented learners. Unfortunately, school counselors today may not have adequate knowledge or training to be able to provide such services and some may have attitudes and biases that prevent effective work with these students. Yet, school counselors have unique skills to apply in service delivery. This discussion examines academic, career/vocational, social, and affective needs of gifted students and areas for which they may require specialized assistance. The American School Counselor Association (ASCA) Ethical Standards for School Counselors (2004) can guide and support school counseling professionals as they obtain the education and training necessary to better meet the needs of gifted and talented learners, who are indeed part of all students whom they are admonished to serve.

 

Citation

Elijah, K. (2011). Meeting the guidance and counseling needs of gifted students in school settings. Journal of School Counseling, 9(14). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v9n14.pdf

 

Type of Article

Current Issues

 

Volume 9, Number 15:

 

Cyberbullying: Emergent Concerns for Adolescents and Challenges for School Counselors

Joy J. Burnham, Vivian H. Wright, and Rick A. Houser, The University of Alabama

 

Abstract

Cyberbullying is a complex and disturbing 21st century phenomena. School counselors must understand the dynamics and risks of cyberbullying in order to help students, parents, and faculty deal with this difficult issue. We examined the extent to which middle school students understand, participate, and cope with cyberbullying issues in today's technologically equipped homes and schools. Results from the study suggested that approximately 15% of the students had cyberbullied others and almost 30% were victims of cyberbullying. Additionally, 50% of the student body was aware that others had been cyberbullied. We also examined student beliefs, thoughts regarding cyberbullying, and suggestions for adults to consider.

 

Citation

Burnham, J. J., Wright, V. H., & Houser, R. A. (2011). Cyberbullying: Emergent concerns for adolescents and challenges for school counselors. Journal of School Counseling, 9(15). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v9n15.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 9, Number 16:

 

Use of Multicultural Supervision With School Counselors to Enhance Cultural Competence

Cirecie West-Olatunji, University of Florida, Rachael D. Goodman, George Mason University, Fairfax Campus, and Lauren Shure, Center for Evaluation and Educational Policy

 

Abstract

School counselors are often tasked with addressing the persistent underachievement of many culturally diverse students. However, there is concern that some school counselors lack the cultural competence to effectively intervene with culturally diverse students. This qualitative study investigated the impact of advanced multicultural supervision sessions on three practicing school counselors at a K-12 school. Results suggest that supervision increased awareness of school counselors’ biases and provided an opportunity for them to engage in discussions regarding the implementation of culturally appropriate counseling strategies. Implications, recommendations, and areas of future research for counselor education and supervision are also presented.

Citation

 

West-Olatunji, C., Goodman, R. D., & Shure, L. (2011). Use of multicultural supervision with school counselors to enhance cultural competence. Journal of School Counseling, 9(16). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v9n16.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 
 

2012

Volume 10, Number 1:

 

The Role School Counselors Believe They Should Adopt in Dropout Prevention

Christine V. Carr and John P. Galassi, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

 

Abstract

The ASCA National Model’s theme and element definitions were used to investigate the school counselor’s role in dropout prevention. The domains recommended by the What Works Clearinghouse (staying-in-school, progressing-in-school, and completing-school) were used to determine how accountability should be assessed. Results indicate that counselors view delivery system as the primary role they should adopt followed in order by advocacy and collaboration, systemic change, and leadership. Counselors did not indicate a preference for any one assessment domain except when comparing the completing-school and progressing-in-school domains. In that comparison, the progressing-in-school domain was the preferred method of demonstrating accountability in dropout prevention.

 

Citation

Carr, C. V., & Galassi, J. P. (2012). The role school counselors believe they should adopt in dropout prevention. Journal of School Counseling, 10(1). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v10n1.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 10, Number 2:

 

Service-Learning and Classroom Guidance: A Program for Elementary Students

Sam Steen, George Washington University, Adele Logan O’Keefe, Old Dominion University, Dana Griffin, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and Katherine Routzahn, Loudoun County Schools

 

Abstract

This article defines service-learning within the context of school counseling and describes a school counseling program that integrated service-learning into classroom guidance for elementary students. Student reflections about their experiences within the framework of personal-social, academic, and career development are provided. Additionally, implications for school counselors, future research, and suggestions for implementation are explored.

 

Citation

Steen, S., O’Keefe, A. L., Griffin, D., & Routzahn, K. (2012). Service-learning and classroom guidance: A program for elementary students. Journal of School Counseling, 10(2). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v10n2.pdf

 

Type of Article

Innovative Methods

 

Volume 10, Number 3:

 

School Counselor Competency and Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Questioning (LGBTQ) Youth

Rebekah Byrd, East Tennessee State University, and Danica G. Hays, Old Dominion University

 

Abstract

Much research has been dedicated to the difficulties LGBTQ individuals face. Further, school counselors have been challenged to assist LGBTQ individuals in the school setting. Being aware of the specific issues and being educated about specific ways to assist these individuals enable school counselors to be more effective clinicians (DePaul, Walsh, & Dam, 2009). This article will address three components of counselor preparation and affirmative school counseling interventions: counselor self-awareness, LGBTQ sexual identity development, and LGBTQ-affirmative school climate. For each component, an activity is presented to assist professional school counselors become more LGBTQ-affirmative.

 

Citation

Byrd, R., & Hays, D. G.(2012). School counselor competency and lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning (LGBTQ) youth. Journal of School Counseling, 10(3). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v10n3.pdf

 

Type of Article

Innovative Methods

  

Volume 10, Number 4:

 

A National Survey of School Counselor Supervision Practices: Administrative, Clinical, Peer, and Technology Mediated Supervision

Dilani M. Perera-Diltz, Cleveland State University, and Kimberly L. Mason, University of New Orleans

 

Abstract

Supervision is vital for personal and professional development of counselors. Practicing school counselors (n = 1557) across the nation were surveyed to explore current supervision practices. Results indicated that 41.1% of school counselors provide supervision. Although 89% receive some type of supervision, only 10.3% of school counselors receive weekly supervision from another school counselor. Most school counselors receive supervision from principals (62.8%). Approximately 32% engage in supervision with other mental health professionals. Only 5.1% of school counselors engage in technology-mediated supervision. Implications, limitations, and future directions for research are provided.

 

Citation

Perera-Diltz, D. M., & Mason, K. L. (2012). A national survey of school counselor supervision practices: Administrative, clinical, peer, and technology mediated supervision. Journal of School Counseling, 10(4). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v10n4.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 10, Number 5:

 

Developing School Counseling Students’ Social Justice Orientation Through Service Learning

Melissa S. Ockerman and Erin C. M. Mason, DePaul University

 

Abstract

Counselor educators must examine the quality and intentionality of coursework and field experiences offered to their students as the role of school counselors continues to transform. The emphasis in the field on school counselors as social justice agents and advocates should be reflected in school counselor training programs. The authors present a two-course sequence using pre-practicum service learning as a valuable program component for assisting school counseling students to develop a social justice orientation.

 

Citation

Ockerman, M., & Mason, E. C. M. (2012). Developing school counseling students’ social justice orientation through service learning. Journal of School Counseling, 10(5). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v10n5.pdf

 

Type of Article

Professional Development

 

Volume 10, Number 6:

 

Factors Influencing School Counselors’ Perceived Effectiveness

Michael Shufelt Moyer, University of Texas at San Antonio, and Kumlan Yu, Catholic University of Korea

 

Abstract

School counselor credentialing requirements have been a continuous topic of discussion for counselor educators and credentialing bodies. Recent discussions include whether or not prior teaching experience is needed to be an effective counselor. The authors surveyed over 300 school counselors from states with varied credentialing standards and asked them to respond to questions regarding perceived counseling effectiveness, collective self-esteem, and previous teaching and school counseling experience. The results indicate the most significant predictors of school counselor perceived effectiveness are their experience in school counseling and their collective self-esteem with the school counseling profession. Implications for school counselor education are discussed.

 

Citation

Moyer, M. S. & Yu, K. (2012). Factors influencing school counselors’ perceived effectiveness. Journal of School Counseling, 10(6). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v10n6.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 10, Number 7:

 

Professional School Counselors’ Role in Partnering With Military Families During the Stages of Deployment

Rebekah F. Cole, Norfolk, Virginia

 

Abstract

In order to help each student to be successful in school, as outlined in the ASCA National Model, professional school counselors are called to partner with military families in order to work for their children’s social, emotional, and academic success during deployments. Possible school-family partnerships that may occur before, during, and after deployments are explored. In addition, the roles of the professional school counselor in these partnerships, which include facilitating educational and emotional preparation, providing emotional support for both children and family members, identifying mental health concerns, and connecting families with needed resources in the community, are discussed.

 

Citation

Cole, R. F. (2012). Professional school counselors’ role in partnering with military families during the stages of deployment. Journal of School Counseling, 10(7). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v10n7.pdf

 

Type of Article

Current Issues

 

Volume 10, Number 8:

 

Elementary School Counselors’ Motivation to Support Student Academic Achievement Through Identified Standards

Jennifer S. Barna, Marywood University, and Pamelia E. Brott, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University

 

Abstract

The researchers explored the relationship between elementary school counselors’ motivational orientation, perceptions of importance and levels of implementation of Academic and Personal/Social Standards as a strategy for supporting academic achievement. Responses from 212 elementary school counselors confirm both types of Standards as being highly important for and highly implemented in their programs. Utilizing Self-Determination Theory (SDT; Deci & Ryan, 1985) as a theoretical framework, it was found participants’ motivation could best be characterized as identified regulation for incorporating personal and social development as a strategy to support academic achievement.

 

Citation

Barna, J. S. & Brott, P. E. (2012). Elementary school counselors’ motivation to support student academic achievement through identified standards. Journal of School Counseling, 10(8). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v10n8.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 10, Number 9:

 

Adding to the Toolbox: Using Creative Interventions With High School Students

Laura Bruneau, Adams State College, and Jake J. Protivnak, Youngstown State University

 

Abstract

This article provides a comprehensive overview of creative interventions used with adolescents in the secondary school setting. School counselors who incorporate creative interventions along with traditional counseling methods will increase their effectiveness with high school students. Creative interventions that can be delivered through classroom guidance and/or individual and group counseling will be discussed, including the use of art, props, reading, writing, music, play, and sandtray. Specific examples of ways to utilize each intervention are also provided to assist school counselors with implementation of these methods.

 

Citation

Bruneau, L., & Protivnak, J. J. (2012). Adding to the toolbox: Using creative interventions with high school students. Journal of School Counseling, 10(9). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v10n9.pdf

 

Type of Article

Innovative Methods

 

Volume 10, Number 10:

 

Conceptualizing Gifted Adolescent Girls Using the Bicultural Skills Model: Implications for School Counselors

Jennifer L. Pepperell, Minnesota State University, Mankato, Deborah J. Rubel, Oregon State University, and Laura A. Maki, Minnesota State University, Mankato

 

Abstract

In counseling research and practice gifted girls often lack identification as a cultural group with unique features. Yet, girls in this population have specific and distinct struggles, worldviews, and ways of navigating social and academic groups. The purpose of this conceptualization article is to apply the bicultural skills model to adolescent gifted girls and to discuss the subsequent implications for school counseling practice.

 

Citation

Pepperell, J. L., Rubel, D. J., & Maki, L. A. (2012). Conceptualizing gifted adolescent girls using the bicultural skills model: Implications for school counselors. Journal of School Counseling, 10(10). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v10n10.pdf

 

Type of Article

Current Issues

 

Volume 10, Number 11:

 

Elementary School Counselors’ Perceptions of Reality Play Counseling in Students’ Relationship Building and Problem-Solving Skills

Eric S. Davis, Argosy University-Tampa, and Mary Ann Clark, University of Florida

 

Abstract

In this qualitative study, eight school counselors participated in a series of reality play counseling trainings introducing techniques appropriate for counseling upper-grade elementary school students to enhance positive relationship building and problem solving skills. Participants were interviewed and their transcripts were analyzed using grounded theory methods which yielded four core categories: positive aspects of implementation, perceptions of the effectiveness of relationship building, perceptions of the effectiveness of developing problem solving skills, and concerns regarding implementation.

 

Citation

Davis, E. S., & Clark, M. A. (2012). Elementary school counselors’ perceptions of reality play counseling in students’ relationship building and problem-solving skills. Journal of School Counseling, 10(11). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v10n11.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 10, Number 12:

 

School Dropout Indicators, Trends, and Interventions for School Counselors

Donna J. Dockery, Virginia Commonwealth University

 

Abstract

School counselors are expected to develop programs that promote academic success for all students, including those at risk for dropping out of school. Knowledge of key indicators of potential dropouts and current trends in dropout prevention research may assist school counselors in better understanding this complex issue. Implementing recommended intervention strategies including longitudinal tracking systems to more clearly identify students who may later drop out of school, targeted programs for use with individual and groups of students at risk of dropping out, and offering school-wide strategies may help school counselors better meet the needs of potential dropouts.

 

Citation

Dockery, D. J. (2012). School dropout indicators, trends, and interventions for school counselors. Journal of School Counseling, 10(12). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v10n12.pdf

 

Type of Article

Current Issues

 

Volume 10, Number 13:

 

Supporting Siblings of Children with Disabilities in the School Setting: Implications and Considerations for School Counselors

Michael D. Hannon, The Pennsylvania State University

 

Abstract

This conceptual manuscript argues the utility of school counselors developing knowledge of and competencies to respond to the socio-emotional needs of the siblings of children with disabilities. The discussion informs readers of the range and diversity within this population, shares how the ecological contexts shape their experience and identity, and details how school counselors can leverage their skills to meet needs that emerge for this population as a result of their unique experiences.

 

Citation

Hannon, M. D. (2012). Supporting siblings of children with disabilities in the school setting: Implications and considerations for school counselors. Journal of School Counseling, 10(13). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v10n13.pdf

 

Type of Article

Current Issues

 

Volume 10, Number 15:

 

Integrating RTI With School Counseling Programs: Being a Proactive Professional School Counselor

Melissa S. Ockerman, Erin C. M. Mason, and Amy Feiker Hollenbeck, DePaul University

 

Abstract

With the implementation of Response to Intervention (RTI) across many states, the school counseling profession must be proactive in establishing its critical role in this process. This article outlines the three essential and shared components between RTI and comprehensive, developmental school counseling programs. Each of these integral and overlapping constructs are discussed and linked to practical applications, implications, and recommendations for professional school counselors’ future practice and research.

 

Citation

Ockerman, M. S., Mason, E. C. M., & Hollenbeck, A. F. (2012). Integrating RTI with school counseling programs: Being a proactive professional school counselor. Journal of School Counseling, 10(15). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v10n15.pdf

 

Type of Article

Current Issues

 

Volume 10, Number 16:

 

Dropout Prevention: Recommendations for School Counselors

Taheera Blount, North Carolina State University

 

Abstract

School counselors are charged to identify potential dropouts and they work closely with students to help them stay in school or find alternative means of completing their education. Ninth grade students transitioning to high school experience insurmountable challenges as they shift from middle school to high school. Students who lack the academic preparedness for high school often repeat the ninth grade or drop out of high school. This literature review explored the reasons why students drop out of school, identified predictive risk factors, and highlighted social indicators associated with students who drop out of high school. The school counselor role is to provide intervention strategies and programs to strengthen students desire to remain in school. This article provides school counselors with recommended strategies to decrease students from dropping out of school.

 

Citation

Blount, T. (2012). Dropout prevention: Recommendations for school counselors. Journal of School Counseling, 10(16). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v10n16.pdf

 

Type of Article

Innovative Methods

 

Volume 10, Number 17:

 

Project SisterCircle: Risk, Intersectionality, and Intervening in Urban Schools

Wendi Williams, Thomas Karlin, and Deidre Wallace, Long Island University – Brooklyn

 

Abstract

Adolescent Black/African descent and Latina girls in urban environments are at heightened risk for the negative consequences of sexual risk. Intervention programming that accounts for the intersection of adolescent girls’ racial/ethnic cultural experiences and gender are likely to be most effective in minimizing their vulnerability for sexual risk. Project SisterCircle (PSC) is a psychosocial and spiritual intervention developed to address sexual risk vulnerability (SRV) among Black/African descent and Latina adolescent girls. The components of the PSC intervention are presented. Practical implications for implementing the intervention in schools are discussed.

 

Citation

Williams, W., Karlin, T., & Wallace, D. (2012). Project SisterCircle: Risk, intersectionality, and intervening in urban schools. Journal of School Counseling, 10(17). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v10n17.pdf

 

Type of Article

Innovative Methods

 

Volume 10, Number 18:

 

Adolescent Brain Development: Current Research and the Impact on Secondary School Counseling Programs

Gail K. Roaten and David J. Roaten, Texas State University

 

Abstract

Brain growth and change is a key factor in adolescent development, influencing cognitions, emotions, and behavior. As technology has improved, so has the research on the adolescent brain. School counselors working with adolescents need to be familiar with recent literature to be more effective in their work with middle and high school students. Understanding changes in teens’ brains and the impact it has on cognitive and personal/social development may assist school counselors in building a developmentally appropriate secondary school counseling program that better meets the needs of adolescent student populations.

 

Citation

Roaten, G. K., & Roaten, D. J. (2012). Adolescent brain development: Current research and the impact on secondary school counseling programs. Journal of School Counseling, 10(18). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v10n18.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 10, Number 19:

 

Elementary School Teachers’ Beliefs and Emotions: Implications for School Counselors and Counselor Educators

Jeffrey M. Warren, University of North Carolina at Pembroke, and Angel R. Dowden, North Carolina A&T State University

 

Abstract

An understanding of teacher beliefs and emotions is invaluable for school counselors developing comprehensive counseling programs. This study explored the relationships among elementary school teachers’ beliefs and emotions. Teachers (n = 42) completed surveys related to efficacy beliefs, irrational beliefs, and emotions. Significant relationships were found among the variables under investigation. Implications for how these findings translate to practice for school counselors and counselor educators are addressed. Suggestions for future research are explored.

 

Citation

Warren, J. M., & Dowden, A. R. (2012). Elementary school teachers’ beliefs and emotions: Implications for school counselors and counselor educators. Journal of School Counseling, 10(19). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v10n19.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 10, Number 20:

 

Sexting: New Challenges for Schools and Professional School Counselors

Adriana G. McEachern, Florida International University, Renee T. McEachern-Ciattoni, Gulliver Preparatory Pinecrest School, and Filomena Martin, Florida International University

 

Abstract

Sexting, the practice of sending sexually explicit messages or photographs of oneself or others on digital electronic devices, presents challenges for schools and professional school counselors. The implications of sexting for schools, school counselors, students, and parents are discussed. School counselor interventions, developing school district Internet use policies, and educating students, teachers, and parents on the dangers of sexting are recommended as ways to prevent and respond to school sexting incidents.

 

Citation

McEachern, A. G., McEachern-Ciattoni, R. T., & Martin, F. (2012). Sexting: New challenges for schools and professional school counselors. Journal of School Counseling, 10(20). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v10n20.pdf

 

Type of Article

Innovative Methods

 

Volume 10, Number 21:

 

Supervision of School Counselors: The SAAFT Model

Katrina Cook, Texas A&M University – San Antonio, Heather Trepal and Catherine Somody, University of Texas at San Antonio

 

Abstract

This article provides a description of a qualitative study of supervisees' experiences of supervision in the Professional Academic Response Model (PARM) program, a supervision intervention/program designed for school counselors. Themes from individual interviews included: (a) the supervisee’s relationship with the supervisor, (b) the supervisee’s relationship with the student, (c) the supervisee’s professional role as a school counselor and (d) the supervisee’s professional identity as a school counselor. These findings underscore the need for additional research in the field that specifically addresses school counselor supervision.

 

Citation

Cook, K., Trepal, H., & Somody, C. (2012). Supervision of school counselors: The SAAFT model. Journal of School Counseling, 10(21). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v10n21.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 10, Number 22:

 

Increasing Career Self-Efficacy Through Group Work With Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Students

Michelle Mitcham, Argosy University, Wendy-lou Greenidge, Michelle Bradham-Cousar, Jennifer Figliozzi, and Mary Ann Thompson

 

Abstract

Group counseling is a practical way for school counselors to deliver career services. School counselors face competing demands on their time coupled with the problematic student to counselor ratios that often exist in schools, group counseling thereby offers a pragmatic solution. This article provides implications for implementing group counseling career interventions in urban schools in order to illustrate ways that school counselors may close the achievement gap and advocate for all students in pursuance of career goals. Thus, group counseling initiatives will help to meaningfully provide students with real world skills both for school and in the world of work.

 

Citation

Mitcham, M., Greenidge, W., Bradham-Cousar, M., Figliozzi, J., & Thompson, M. A. (2012). Increasing career self-efficacy through group work with culturally and linguistically diverse students. Journal of School Counseling, 10(22). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v10n22.pdf

 

Type of Article

Innovative Methods

 

Volume 10, Number 23:

 

A Call to Action: Addressing the Childhood Obesity Epidemic Through Comprehensive School Counseling Programs

Christopher T. Belser, Jessica A. Morris, and Jennifer M. Hasselbeck, Baton Rouge, Louisiana

 

Abstract

The need for school-based interventions targeting the childhood obesity epidemic has been well documented. The risk factors associated with childhood obesity are physical, mental, psychosocial, academic, and economic. With training in developing comprehensive programs and interventions, professional school counselors are positioned to assist students suffering as a result of childhood obesity. This manuscript provides strategies for intervening with students and other school community stakeholders within the context of the themes of school counseling as indicated by the National Model (2005): advocacy, leadership, collaboration, and systemic change.

 

Citation

Belser, C. T., Morris, J. A., & Hasselbeck, J. M. (2012). A call to action: Addressing the childhood obesity epidemic through comprehensive school counseling programs. Journal of School Counseling, 10(23). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v10n23.pdf

 

Type of Article

Innovative Methods

 

Volume 10, Number 24:

 

School Counselors and School Psychologists: Partners in Collaboration for Student Success Within RTI and CDCGP Frameworks

Elias Zambrano, Felicia Castro-Villarreal, and Jeremy Sullivan, University of Texas at San Antonio

 

Abstract

For many students, school counselors and school psychologists are the initial and primary mental health service providers. The authors will articulate how these two professional groups can use complementary competencies to better serve students through collaborative efforts. Within the context of Response to Intervention and the CDCGP Model, a collaborative model complete with sample strategies to illustrate the effective delivery of collaborative prevention, intervention, and remedial services for all students is provided.

 

Citation

Zambrano, E., Castro-Villarreal, F., & Sullivan, J. (2012). School counselors and school psychologists: Partners in collaboration for student success within RTI and CDCGP frameworks. Journal of School Counseling, 10(24). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v10n24.pdf

 

Type of Article

Innovative Methods

 

Volume 10, Number 25:

 

Peer Tutoring With Child-Centered Play Therapy Language

Sarah Vavreck, Wake Forest University, and Judy Esposito, Elon University

 

Abstract

The focus of this paper is on responses from fifth grade peer tutors who were trained to use child-centered play therapy language during tutoring sessions with kindergarteners. The focus of this project was to identify academic and social/emotional benefits of participating in the program. Results indicated that participation in the program provided a rich, experiential learning opportunity for the fifth graders to develop a relationship with a younger child, to reflect on the challenges of working with a younger child, and to discover and implement child-centered methods of setting appropriate limits with their kindergarten tutees.

 

Citation

Vavreck, S., & Esposito, J. (2012). Peer tutoring with child-centered play therapy language. Journal of School Counseling, 10(25). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v10n25.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 
 

2013

Volume 11, Number 1:

 

Helping Latina/o Students Navigate the College Choice Process: Considerations for Secondary School Counselors

Melissa A. Martinez, Texas State University - San Marcos

 

Abstract

This qualitative study utilized interviews with 20 Latina/o high school seniors and five secondary school counselors in South Texas to further understand how counselors help Latina/o students navigate their college choice process. Findings indicate counselors provided students with access to college information and facilitated university representative visits and other college opportunities. However, assistance with individual academic and college planning was limited due to counselors’ multiple duties and large caseloads. Counselors also noted challenges for Latina/o students related to: gender role expectations, familismo, financial need, and first generation college status. Considerations for secondary school counselors working with Latina/o students are provided.

 

Citation

Martinez, M. A. (2013). Helping Latina/o students navigate the college choice process: Considerations for secondary school counselors. Journal of School Counseling, 11(1). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v11n1.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 11, Number 2:

 

Making DATA Work: A Process for Conducting Action Research

Anita Young, Johns Hopkins University, and Carol Kaffenberger, George Mason University

 

Abstract

This conceptual model introduces a process to help school counselors use data to drive decision making and offers examples to implement the process. A step-by-step process is offered to help school counselors and school counselor supervisors address educational issues, close achievement gaps, and demonstrate program effectiveness. To illustrate the model, stakeholders use accountability strategies that address academic achievement issues, empower school counselors to be change agents, and build relationships with teachers and administrators is described.

 

Citation

Young, A., & Kaffenberger, C. (2013). Making data work: A process for conducting action research. Journal of School Counseling, 11(2). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v11n2.pdf

 

Type of Article

Innovative Methods

 

Volume 11, Number 3:

 

Underrepresented College Students’ Experiences With School Counselors

Donna J. Dockery, Virginia Commonwealth University, and Susan McKelvey, Virginia Commonwealth University

 

Abstract

School counselors should focus on helping underrepresented students access higher education in efforts to close achievement gaps. Limited information is available regarding how first-generation and ethnic minority students view school counseling efforts to promoting post-secondary opportunities. Participants in this study indicated school counselors could provide more support for college planning and transitions. Students of color held lower expectations that school counselors could help with college planning. Although more first-generation students received career information compared to second generation students, there were no significant differences in perceived support for college admissions. Because parents had the greatest influence on college decision-making, counselors should provide college programming for all students, with an emphasis on parents and on underrepresented students.

 

Citation

Dockery, D. J., & McKelvey, S. (2013). Underrepresented college students’ experiences with school counselors. Journal of School Counseling, 11(3). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v11n3.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 11, Number 4:

 

Change-Agent-for-Equity (CAFE) Model: A Framework for School Counselor Identity

Erin C. M. Mason and Melissa S. Ockerman, DePaul University, and Stuart F. Chen-Hayes, Lehman College of the City University of New York

 

Abstract

Significant recent influences in the profession have provided clear direction about what school counseling programs should look like but have not explicitly defined the professional identity necessary to enact these programs. A Change-Agent-for-Equity (CAFE) Model draws from the American School Counselor Association National Model (2003, 2005, 2012) and the tenets of the National Center for Transforming School Counseling (Martin, 2002), proposing that the school counselor’s professional identity is central to school counseling programs and program outcomes. A case scenario is presented to illustrate the CAFE model in context.

 

Citation

Mason, E. C. M., Ockerman, M. S., & Chen-Hayes, S. F. (2013). Change-Agent-for-Equity (CAFE) model: A framework for school counselor identity. Journal of School Counseling, 11(4). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v11n4.pdf

 

Type of Article

Professional Development

 

Volume 11, Number 5:

 

Integrating School Counseling Core Curriculum Into Academic Curriculum

Kelly A. Kozlowski, Bowling Green State University

 

Abstract

Research indicates that the social and emotional well being of students impacts academic outcomes; however, due to a limited amount of class time, the counseling core curriculum that addresses these needs often takes a back seat to academic learning. This article proposes a paradigm shift where teachers and school counselors collaborate to integrate the counseling core curriculum into daily academic lessons. This results in meeting ASCA’s academic, personal/social, and career student standards within the context of academic content. Implications are discussed, such as school counselors being seen as collaborators in increasing the academic outcomes for all students, and closing the achievement gap.

 

Citation

Kozlowski, K. A. (2013). Integrating school counseling core curriculum into academic curriculum. Journal of School Counseling, 11(5). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v11n5.pdf

 

Type of Article

Innovative Methods

 

Volume 11, Number 6:

 

A Comprehensive Stress Education and Reduction Program Utilizing a Well-being Model: Incorporating the ASCA Student Standards

Dawn S. Tarabochia, Montana State University

 

Abstract

The American School Counselor Association developed national standards for students to provide a framework for a holistic approach to student academic, career, and personal/social development. While the ASCA Student Standards are comprehensive, little attention is given to stress. Adolescents are experiencing greater stress associated with academic performance, extracurricular activities and worry about the future. The utilization of a well-being model and the integration of the ASCA Student Standards into school counseling programs for middle and high students can create a more holistic approach to providing stress education and stress reduction techniques.

 

Citation

Tarabochia, D. S. (2013). A comprehensive stress education and reduction program utilizing a well-being model: Incorporating the ASCA Student Standards. Journal of School Counseling, 11(6). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v11n6.pdf

 

Type of Article

Innovative Methods

 

Volume 11, Number 7:

 

Examination of Multicultural Counseling Competencies in School Counselors

Michele R. Guzmán, Nicolina A. Calfa, Valerie Van Horn Kerne, and Christopher McCarthy, The University of Texas at Austin

 

Abstract

The study investigated 227 school counselor’s multicultural counseling competencies (MCC). MCC were measured with a self-report inventory, and with ratings of responses to short vignettes, designed to assess “demonstrated” competency. Results indicated that school counselor self-ratings did not predict demonstrated ratings of MCC. People of color self-reported higher MCC. A significant effect for age and teaching experience was found with two of the four vignettes, with younger counselors and those with less teaching experience having more highly rated responses. Years of counseling experience was also significantly related to responses on one vignette, with less experienced counselors receiving higher ratings.

 

Citation

Guzmán, M. R., Calfa, N. A., Kerne, V. V. H., & McCarthy, C. (2013). Examination of multicultural counseling competencies in school counselors. Journal of School Counseling, 11(7). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v11n7.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 11, Number 8:

 

The Ghost of “Emo:” Searching for Mental Health Themes In a Popular Music Format

Timothy D. Baker, Saint Cloud State University, Sondra Smith-Adcock, University of Florida, and Virginia R. Glynn, Saint Cloud State University

 

Abstract

The concept of “Emo” has gained attention among counselors who work with teens in school settings. Emo has been associated with music and popular media has linked it to mental health concerns, but scholarly sources have not converged regarding what sort of music it is, or what it means for adolescents’ wellness. The authors devise and explain a procedure for identifying and analyzing music with Emo characteristics. Several songs were identified having lyrics or video imagery that portrayed mental health scenarios, sufficient to trigger counselors’ duty-to-warn and/or mandated reporting obligations. Recommendations are made for the practice of school counselors.

 

Citation

Baker, T. D., Smith-Adcock, S.,& Glynn, V. R. (2013). The ghost of “Emo:” Searching for mental health themes in a popular music format. Journal of School Counseling, 11(8). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v11n8.pdf

 

Type of Article

Innovative Methods

 

Volume 11, Number 9:

 

Helping Students With Emotional Abuse: A Critical Area of Competence for School Counselors

Trevor J. Buser and Juleen K. Buser, Rider University

 

Abstract

Many school counselors experience difficulties in identifying and reporting suspected cases of emotional abuse. These difficulties are concerning, given the relatively high prevalence rates of emotional abuse. In this article, we discuss the definition of emotional abuse, review research on its prevalence and psychological correlates, and provide recommendations for reporting suspected cases. Attention is also given to the school counselor’s role in training teachers/staff on emotional abuse issues and intervening with students who experience emotional abuse.

 

Citation

Buser, T. J., & Buser, J. K. (2013). Helping students with emotional abuse: A critical area of competence for school counselors. Journal of School Counseling, 11(9). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v11n9.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 11, Number 10:

 

Principals: What Are their Roles and Responsibilities?

Amanda Cisler and Mary Alice Bruce, University of Wyoming

 

Abstract

Collaboration between school counselors and principals is increasingly important in this accountability era. The purpose of this quantitative study was to examine the role of principal as perceived by professional school counselors and principals, both in training and practicing. While similarities were found in two categories: Managing School Personnel and School Climate, significant differences emerged in all three categories, including Parent and Community Collaboration. These findings indicate that school counselors and principals could benefit from learning more about the others’ respective roles to enhance their working partnership towards increasing academic achievement.

 

Citation

Cisler, A., & Bruce, M. A. (2013). Principals: What are their roles and responsibilities? Journal of School Counseling, 11(10). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v11n10.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 11, Number 11:

 

A Qualitative Examination of School Counselors’ Training to Recognize and Respond to Adolescent Mental Health Issues

Cynthia T. Walley, Hunter College, and Tim Grothaus, Old Dominion University

 

Abstract

Given the prevalence of adolescent mental health issues and the impact they have on adolescent development and school success, school counselors are challenged to provide appropriate prevention and intervention services. Yet the sufficiency of school counselor training for these challenges is unclear. Qualitative procedures were used to examine eight secondary school counselors’ preparation to recognize and respond to adolescent mental health issues. Results indicate beneficial aspects of training occurred prior to, during, and after their graduate counseling program. Training deficits and impediments were also identified. Implications for counselor educators, school counseling students, and school counseling supervisors are discussed.

 

Citation

Walley, C. T., & Grothaus, T. (2013). A qualitative examination of school counselors’ training to recognize and respond to adolescent mental health issues. Journal of School Counseling, 11(11). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v11n11.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 11, Number 12:

 

School Counselors’ Constructions of Student Confidentiality

Shannon Trice-Black, Morgan E. Kiper Riechel, and M. Ann Shillingford, College of William and Mary

 

Abstract

Confidentiality in counseling relationships helps ensure trust between clients and counselors. Yet, defining and understanding the boundaries of confidentiality in school settings is often difficult, as school counselors are engaged in multiple relationships with various stakeholders. This qualitative phenomenological study explores the experiences of nine practicing school counselors to answer the following two research questions: 1) how do professional school counselors respond to ethical issues related to student confidentiality as they perform their responsibilities within the school community? And, 2) how do school counselors believe members of the school community perceive student confidentiality? Upon analysis, two main themes emerged from participants’ narratives: relationships and training. Subthemes were also present for each of the two main themes. Under relationships, subthemes include trust, school culture, teamwork and consultation. Under training, subthemes of graduate training, professional development, and experience emerged. Implications for counselor educators and school counseling graduate programs are discussed.

 

Citation

Trice-Black, S., Riechel, M. E. K., & Shillingford, M. A. (2013). School counselors’ constructions of student confidentiality. Journal of School Counseling, 11(12). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v11n12.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 11, Number 13:

 

The Search Stage: When, Where, and What Information Do Urban Public High School Students Gather About College?

Helen Janc Malone, Harvard University

 

Abstract

This qualitative longitudinal multiple case study offers a perspective into the college information gathering practices across a sample of low-income students at two large urban public high schools. The findings show that students engage in and benefit from comprehensive information gathering strategies but that disparities exist across academic performance levels and demographic factors. The study sheds light on the paramount role that school counselors play during the students’ college information gathering “search” stage. The presented findings offer concrete strategies that can aid school counselors in evaluating and improving their own college-related services.

 

Citation

Malone, H. J. (2013). The search stage: When, where, and what information do urban public high school students gather about college? Journal of School Counseling, 11(13). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v11n13.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 11, Number 14:

 

Using Motivational Interviewing With School-Age Bullies: A New Use for a Proven, Evidence-Based Intervention

Brenna A. Juhnke, Ronald Reagan High School, San Antonio, Texas, Gerald A. Juhnke, The University of Texas at San Antonio, Russell C. Curtis and E. Heather Thompson, Western Carolina University, Kenneth M. Coll, Boise State University, and Fangzhou Yu, Michael S. Moyer, and Alison Mullett, The University of Texas at San Antonio

 

Abstract

Motivational interviewing is a proven, evidence-based intervention. It has been successfully utilized as a potent intervention with students presenting a broad range of concerns from substance abuse to obesity. To date, however, no articles exist within the general counseling literature or the Journal of School Counseling specifically describing how to utilize motivational interviewing with school-aged bullying perpetrators. This article will describe how school counselors can effectively utilize motivational interviewing with bullying school-age youth.

 

Citation

Juhnke, B. A., Juhnke, G. A., Curtis, R. C., Thompson, E. H., Coll, K. M., Fangzhou, Y., …Mullett, A. (2013). Using motivational interviewing with school-age bullies: A new use for a proven, evidence-based intervention. Journal of School Counseling, 11(14). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v11n14.pdf

 

Type of Article

Innovative Methods

 

Volume 11, Number 15:

 

Ambiguous Loss and its Effects on Children: Implications and Interventions for School Counselors

K. Guidry, C. Simpson, T. Test, and C. Bloomfield, Texas A & M University-Commerce

 

Abstract

School counselors are regularly tasked with managing student’s emotions and behaviors that impede school performance. This daunting assignment can be overwhelming for school professionals. With the many diagnoses that may provide an explanation for dysfunctional behavior amongst students, the possibility of grief is frequently overlooked. The purpose of this article is to define and describe the concept of grief and how it may explain challenging behaviors with students. Additionally, this definition will be expanded by introducing the definition of ambiguous grief. Examples of ambiguous grief scenarios will be provided, as well as implications for school counselors.

 

Citation

Guidry, K., Simpson, C., Test, T., & Bloomfield, C. (2013). Ambiguous loss and its effects on children: Implications and interventions for school counselors. Journal of School Counseling, 11(15). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v11n15.pdf

 

Type of Article

Current Issues

 

Volume 11, Number 16:

 

On Track: A University Retention Model Utilizing School Counseling Program Interns

Jill M. Thorngren, South Dakota State University, Mark D. Nelson and Larry J. Baker, Montana State University – Bozeman, Barbara Zuck, Montana State University – Northern, Rebecca L. Koltz, Montana State University – Bozeman

 

Abstract

This article outlines a pilot study conducted with persisting and non-persisting students in a mid-sized public university in the West. Based on those findings, a retention initiative was developed. The study and initiative both utilize the ASCA framework, making a case that this model has application in institutions of higher education as well as public schools. The significance of collaborations between school counseling programs and college advising centers is also portrayed.

 

Citation

Thorngren, J. M., Nelson, M. D., Baker, L. J., Zuck, B., & Koltz, R. L. (2013). On track: A university retention model utilizing school counseling program interns. Journal of School Counseling, 11(16). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v11n16.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 11, Number 17:

 

School Counseling in Disciplinary Alternative Education Programs

Patrick R. Mullen and Glenn W. Lambie, University of Central Florida

 

Abstract

Disciplinary alternative education programs (DAEP) service many students; however, limited literature is published for school counselors working in these schools. Therefore, this manuscript provides a conceptual foundation for counselors working with students attending DAEPs. Specifically, the manuscript (a) reviews the types of alternative education schools in the United States; (b) introduces the individual, academic, and family factors of students in DAEPs; and (c) presents implications for counselors in DAEPs to support service delivery.

 

Citation

Mullen, P. R., & Lambie, G. W. (2013). School counseling in disciplinary alternative education programs. Journal of School Counseling, 11(17). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v11n17.pdf

 

Type of Article

Current Issues

 

Volume 11, Number 18:

 

Vision: A Conceptual Framework for School Counselors

Jennifer Scaturo Watkinson, Loyola University Maryland

 

Abstract

Vision is essential to the implementation of the American School Counselor Association (ASCA) National Model. Drawing from research in organizational leadership, this article provides a conceptual framework for how school counselors can incorporate vision as a strategy for implementing school counseling programs within the context of practice. Specific attention is given to how school counselors craft, communicate, and market their school counseling vision to gain support from teachers and administrators to implement comprehensive school counseling programs fashioned after the ASCA National Model.

 

Citation

Watkinson, J. S. (2013). Vision: A conceptual framework for school counselors. Journal of School Counseling, 11(18). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v11n18.pdf

 

Type of Article

Professional Development

 

Volume 11, Number 19:

 

The Need for Developmental Models in Supervising School Counselors

Laura L. Gallo, Marion, Iowa

 

Abstract

Developmental models, like Stoltenberg, McNeil, and Delworth’s integrated developmental model (IDM) for supervision (1998), provide supervisors with an important resource in understanding and managing the counseling student’s development and experience. The current status of school counseling supervision is discussed as well as the benefits of developmental models, such as IDM, are identified with specific examples related to school counseling. Lastly, implications for the future in incorporating developmental models into school counseling supervision are mentioned.

 

Citation

Gallo, L. L. (2013). The need for developmental models in supervising school counselors. Journal of School Counseling, 11(19). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v11n19.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 11, Number 20:

 

Early Career School Counselors’ Training Perspectives: Implications for School Counselor Educators

Christopher D. Slaten, Purdue University, Dominick A. Scalise, University of Maryland-College Park, and Krystle Gutting and Thomas W. Baskin, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

 

Abstract

The current study examined early career professional school counselors’ experiences related to their work as mental health professionals in schools. Nine individuals participated in qualitative interviews that were analyzed using consensual qualitative research methods (Hill, 2012). All individuals were professional school counselors trained in accredited programs and had three or fewer years of post-degree experience in their schools. Implications for school counseling educators that train school counselors and suggestions for future advocacy are presented. This study provides important information for both training programs and school systems to better understand the unique skills of school counselors and the emerging needs of the students they serve.

 

Citation

Slaten, C. D., Scalise, D. A., Gutting, K., & Baskin, T. W. (2013). Early career school counselors’ training perspectives: Implications for school counselor educators. Journal of School Counseling, 11(20). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v11n20.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 11, Number 21:

 

Student Growth Within the School Garden: Addressing Personal/Social, Academic, and Career Development

Jacqueline M. Swank, University of Florida, and David E. Swank, Daytona Beach, Florida

 

Abstract

School counselors have the challenging task of implementing a comprehensive, developmental school counseling program to serve a large number of students. We present the creative use of a garden program to promote the development of students through the integration of the natural environment. Additionally, we describe activities and metaphors within the five garden stages encompassed within the program (planning, preparing, planting, maintaining, and harvesting), identify the American School Counselor Association Student Standards (ASCA, 2004) addressed within the garden activities, and discuss the implications and practical considerations for school counselors.

 

Citation

Swank, J. M., & Swank, D. E. (2013). Student growth within the school garden: Addressing personal/social, academic, and career development. Journal of School Counseling, 11(21). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v11n21.pdf

 

Type of Article

Innovative Methods

 
 

2014

Volume 12, Number 1:

 

An Ethics Challenge for School Counselors: Part 2

Janet G. Froeschle Hicks, Nicole Noble, Steve Berry, Steve Talbert, Charles Crews, and Jiaqi Li, Texas Tech University, and Yvette Castillo, West Texas A&M University

 

Abstract

Ethical and legal issues are dealt with daily by school counselors (Bodenhorn, 2006; Moyer, Sullivan & Growcock, 2012). Despite the prevalence of these issues, few resources exist to assist these professionals when making ethical and legal decisions. In addition, a lack of supervision for school counselors and managing complexities inherent when working with minors creates a need for continuous training (Moyer, Sullivan, & Growcock, 2012; Remley & Herlihy, 2007). As a result, this article intends to assist school counselors in making proper ethical and legal decisions. Each ethical dilemma is described via a quiz format to further ethical knowledge and discussion. Real cases, as submitted by school counselors, are described and followed by suggestions as based on ethical codes.

 

Citation

Hicks, J. G. F., Noble, N., Berry, S., Talbert, S., Crews, C., Li, J., & Castillo, Y. (2014). An Ethics Challenge for School Counselors: Part 2. Journal of School Counseling, 12(1). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v12n1.pdf

 

Type of Article

Current Issues

 

Volume 12, Number 2:

 

My Name Is Not Michael: Strategies for Promoting Cultural Responsiveness in Schools

Lisa L. Schulz, Kara Hurt, and Natalya Lindo, University of North Texas

 

Abstract

With the changing cultural demographics in U.S. classrooms, school counselors must develop innovative approaches to promote culturally responsive school climates and organizational change. A vision is offered of systemic cultural responsiveness and culturally relevant teaching practices that nurture and engage all learners. The role of the school counselor in realizing such transformation is described. In this vision, the tenets of advocacy, consultation, collaboration, systemic change, and leadership identified in the ASCA National Model are recognized as the means by which the school counselor can indirectly promote student achievement. This article offers examples of intervention strategies designed to impact the school system, the teaching and learning process, and foster cultural responsiveness. Recommendations for advancing the role of the school counselor are shared.

 

Citation

Schulz, L. L., Hurt, K., & Lindo, N. (2014). My name is not Michael: Strategies for promoting cultural responsiveness in schools. Journal of School Counseling, 12(2). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v12n2.pdf

 

Type of Article

Current Issues

 

Volume 12, Number 3:

 

Perceptions of Preparedness for a Major School Crisis: An Evaluation of Missouri School Counselors

Danilea Werner, Auburn University

 

Abstract

A major school crisis can cause physical and emotional distress as well as impact student academic performance. The purpose of this study was to use a web-based survey to explore Missouri school counselors’ perceptions of individual and school-wide crisis preparedness and crisis training experiences. Results indicate that the more involved school counselors are in the crisis planning process the more prepared they feel. By understanding the differences in school counselor crisis preparedness perception and their involvement in crisis planning, educational institutions can design and target training to increase effectiveness and improve disaster response.

 

Citation

Werner, D. (2014). Perceptions of preparedness for a major school crisis: An evaluation of Missouri school counselors. Journal of School Counseling, 12(3). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v12n3.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 12, Number 4:

 

Where Are We Now? An Updated Review of the School Counseling Literature for Trends and Themes

Adam Zagelbaum, Sonoma State University, Theresa Kruczek and Charlene Alexander, Ball State University, and Hugh Crethar, Oklahoma State University

 

Abstract

The present study is a follow-up to an earlier investigation of themes and trends in school counseling journals. The original study examined articles pre- and post-merger of the American School Counseling Association (ASCA) journal(s) for content reflecting themes evolving from the Education Trust Initiative. This study evaluated literature reflected in the Professional School Counseling (PSC) journal articles since the adoption of the ASCA National Model to assess trends as well as to identify current values and issues in the profession. The results suggest content in professional journals is reflective the ASCA National Model and suggestions are offered regarding future publications.

 

Citation

Zagelbaum, A., Kruczek, T., Alexander, C., & Crethar, H. (2014). Where are we now? An updated review of the school counseling literature for trends and themes. Journal of School Counseling, 12(4). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v12n4.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 12, Number 5:

 

A Phenomenological Study of Urban School Counselors’ Perceptions of Low-Income Families

Rebekah F. Cole, Capella University, and Tim Grothaus, Old Dominion University

 

Abstract

This qualitative, phenomenological study explores urban school counselors’ perceptions of low-income families in their schools. Ten school counselors participated in two rounds of individual interviews and answered two emailed reflective questions. Six themes emerged from the data: (a) perceptions of family characteristics and environment, (b) perceptions of family attitudes and actions regarding education, (c) awareness of obstacles and challenges for families, (d) struggle empathizing with low-income families, (e) choice of roles in working with low-income families, and (f) personal feelings and reflections in response to experiences with low-income families. Implications for school counselors, supervisors, school counseling district supervisors, school counseling professional organizations, and counselor educators are discussed.

 

Citation

Cole, R. F., & Grothaus, T. (2014). A phenomenological study of urban school counselors’ perceptions of low-income families. Journal of School Counseling, 12(5). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v12n5.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 12, Number 6:

 

Spirituality and School Counselor Education and Supervision

Laura L. Gallo, University of Iowa

 

Abstract

Spirituality is an area that has not received a great deal of attention in supervision, yet it can have substantial effects on the counseling process. A definition of spirituality that allows for a variety of worldviews can be useful to both counselor and client as it helps strengthen the counseling relationship and lessen differences between them. In addition, there are counseling models that have been created to integrate the role of spirituality within supervision and to provide a framework for supervisees. Recommendations in how to incorporate spirituality for supervisors to use with school counselors in training are provided.

 

Citation

Gallo, L. L. (2014). Spirituality and school counselor education and supervision. Journal of School Counseling, 12(6). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v12n6.pdf

 

Type of Article

Professional Development

 

Volume 12, Number 7:

 

Bullying Prevention and the Parent Involvement Model

Jered B. Kolbert, Duquesne University, Danielle Schultz, Quaker Valley School District, and Laura M. Crothers, Duquesne University

 

Abstract

A recent meta-analysis of bullying prevention programs provides support for social-ecological theory, in which parent involvement addressing child bullying behaviors is seen as important in preventing school-based bullying. The purpose of this manuscript is to suggest how Epstein and colleagues’ parent involvement model can be used as a framework in implementing bullying prevention programs. School counselors can use the types of parent involvement identified in Epstein and van Voorhis (2010) model, including parenting, communicating, volunteering, learning at home, decision-making, and collaborating with the community, in working with parents and families in the service of promoting anti-bullying interventions and programming in school systems.

 

Citation

Kolbert, J. B., Schultz, D., & Crothers, L. M. (2014). Bullying prevention and the parent involvement model. Journal of School Counseling, 12(7). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v12n7.pdf

 

Type of Article

Innovative Methods

 

Volume 12, Number 8:

 

Social Media and Professional School Counselors: Ethical and Legal Considerations

Patrick R. Mullen, Catherine Griffith, Jennifer H. Greene, and Glenn W. Lambie, University of Central Florida

 

Abstract

The use of social media continues to expand in prevalence and is a medium of communication for individuals of all ages. Schools are using social media to engage their stakeholders at increasing rates. Therefore, school counselors require the knowledge and appreciation of ethical and legal issues regarding the use of such technology. The purpose of this manuscript is to: (a) introduce the development and prevalence of social media; (b) review legal and ethical issues related to social media use in schools; and (c) present strategies in which school counselors can engage in ethical interactions via social media.

 

Citation

Mullen, P. R., Griffith, C., Greene, J. H., & Lambie, G. W. (2014). Social media and professional school counselors: Ethical and legal considerations. Journal of School Counseling, 12(8). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v12n8.pdf

 

Type of Article

Current Issues

 

Volume 12, Number 9:

 

Promoting Educational Resilience Among African American Students at Risk of School Failure: The Role of School Counselors

Joseph M. Williams, George Mason University, Arie T. Greenleaf, Seattle University, Tracey Albert, George Mason University, and Erin F. Barnes, University of Texas at El Paso

 

Abstract

While the educational difficulties of African American students from low-income households are well documented and widely discussed in the literature, far less attention has been paid to students who succeed in school despite significant challenges such as poverty, housing instability, and food insecurity. A review of the literature identifies the protective factors and processes that facilitate academic success among African American (K-12) students placed at-risk of school failure. Implications for school counselors and recommendations for facilitating educational resiliency among African American students from low-income households are discussed.

 

Citation

Williams, J. M., Greenleaf, A. T., Albert, T., & Barnes, E. F. (2014). Promoting educational resilience among African American students at risk of school failure: The role of school counselors. Journal of School Counseling, 12(9). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v12n9.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 12, Number 10:

 

Building on Strengths and Addressing Challenges: Enhancing External School Counseling Program Evaluation

Ian Martin, University of San Diego, Sharon Rallis, University of Massachusetts, Amherst

 

Abstract

This conceptual paper outlines the implications associated with increasing external evaluation within school counseling programs. The authors propose that enhancing external evaluation may help to both strengthen school counseling programs and enhance their legitimacy within increasingly competitive and academically focused school systems. More specifically, the authors identify school-based evaluation (SBE) as a relevant and pragmatic tool to better support internal program evaluation strengths that already exist in the field through more intentional external program evaluation strategies. Two positive cases of external program evaluation are presented and discussed from an SBE perspective. Finally, the authors offer practitioners guidelines for building external SBE school counseling program evaluation practices and structures within their own local contexts.

 

Citation

Martin, M., & Rallis, S. (2014). Building on strengths and addressing challenges: Enhancing external school counseling program evaluation. Journal of School Counseling, 12(10). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v12n10.pdf

 

Type of Article

Current Issues

 

Volume 12, Number 11:

 

Transition to College and Students With High Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorder: Strategy Considerations for School Counselors

Abiola O. Dipeolu, The University at Buffalo, SUNY, Cassandra Storlie, Kent State University, and Carol Johnson, University of Wisconsin-Stout

 

Abstract

There are limited school counseling resources that address the unique post high school transition issues faced by students with High-functioning Autism Spectrum Disorder (HASD). While many school counselors have excellent skills in assessment, advising, and career planning, it is worthwhile to expand these to include working with students with disabilities, particularly those diagnosed with HASD. The purpose of this article is to build a deeper understanding of the challenges faced by students with HASD and to provide school counselors with strategies to assist these students with school to college transitions.

 

Citation

Dipeolu, A. O., Storlie, C., & Johnson, C. (2014). Transition to college and students with high functioning autism spectrum disorder: Strategy considerations for school counselors. Journal of School Counseling, 12(11). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v12n11.pdf

 

Type of Article

Innovative Methods

 

Volume 12, Number 12:

 

A Comparison of Self-Monitoring With and Without Reinforcement to Improve On-Task Classroom Behavior

Tonya N. Davis, Sharon Dacus, Jenna Bankhead, Megan Haupert, Lisa Fuentes, and Tamara Zoch, Baylor University, Soyeon Kang, The University of Texas at Austin, Shanna Attai, Baylor University, and Russell Lang, Texas State University-San Marcos, Clinic for Autism Research Evaluation and Support

 

Abstract

In this study we analyzed the effects of a self-monitoring and self-monitoring plus reinforcement intervention on classroom behavior. A typically-developing high school student demonstrating difficulty staying on-task during classroom instruction was observed in three classroom settings associated with high levels of off-task behavior. During baseline, the participant was observed during typical classroom activities. Next, the participant was taught to self-monitor his on-task classroom behavior, but no additional reinforcement was provided. Finally, self-monitoring plus reinforcement was implemented, in which tangible reinforcement was provided for on-task behavior. A multiple baseline across settings design was implemented. Findings suggest that only the self-monitoring plus reinforcement intervention had a marked effect on on-task behavior.

 

Citation

Davis, T. N., Dacus, S., Bankhead, J., Haupert, M., Fuentes, L., Zoch, T., ... Lang, R. (2014). A comparison of self-monitoring with and without reinforcement to improve on-task classroom behavior. Journal of School Counseling, 12(12). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v12n12.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 12, Number 13:

 

Professional School Counseling Evaluation Rubric: Advocating for the Profession Through Awareness and Accountability

Carrie A. Wachter Morris and Christopher D. Slaten, Purdue University

 

Abstract

Professional school counselors have been advocating for their role as counselors in the schools for decades (Galassi & Akos, 2007; Gysbers, 2002; Slaten & Baskin, 2013). Although researchers have addressed this concern through advocacy in service and writing, school counselors continue to perform a significant amount of non-counseling activities. In this paper, we address one potential solution to this ongoing problem: the evaluation of school counselors. Currently, most school counselors are evaluated by school building administrators based on teaching standards. The author will introduce a protocol for administrators to utilize that is based on school counseling activities.

 

Citation

Morris, C. A. W., & Slaten, C. D. (2014). Professional school counseling evaluation rubric: Advocating for the profession through awareness and accountability. Journal of School Counseling, 12(13). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v12n13.pdf

 

Type of Article

Professional Development

 

Volume 12, Number 14:

 

Adlerian Adventure-Based Counseling to Enhance Self-Esteem in School Children

Holly H. Wagner, University of Missouri – Saint Louis, and Anna Elliott, Pocatello, Idaho

 

Abstract

This article provides a rationale for using adventure-based counseling (ABC) principles to promote children's self-esteem through group work within the school setting. The effectiveness of combining Adlerian theory with ABC to promote self-esteem is established. The process that would allow a school counselor to plan, organize, facilitate, and evaluate this group successfully is emphasized. Previous literature (Wick, Wick, & Peterson, 1997) conceptualized the efficacy of combining Adlerian theory with ABC based interventions in school. This article expands upon this idea to rationalize the heightened need for this type of intervention in an era of increased interaction through technology and decreased opportunities for developmental social learning. Discussion includes recruiting counselees, forming objectives and intended outcomes, and designing a program within the school. This article includes a selection of activities and initiatives and suggested evaluative measures.

 

Citation

Wagner, H. H., & Elliott, A. (2014). Adlerian adventure-based counseling to enhance self-esteem in school children. Journal of School Counseling, 12(15). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v12n15.pdf

 

Type of Article

Innovative Methods

 

Volume 12, Number 15:

 

School Counselors’ Use of Solution-Focused Tenets and Techniques in School-based Site Supervision

Dawnette L. Cigrand, Winona State University, and Susannah M. Wood and David Duys, University of Iowa

 

Abstract

The tenets and techniques of solution-focused (SF) theory have potential for application to school counseling site supervision; however, research on the use of these practices in site supervision is needed. This study examined the extent to which school counseling site supervisors integrated SF tenets and techniques into their supervisory practices. Researchers surveyed 74 school counselors across the United States to identify which SF techniques were used by school counselors in supervision, and to determine if the tenets of SF were evident in their supervision work. Results indicate that school counselors do agree with basic SF tenets and are already using SF techniques in site supervision of interns. Implications for research, training and practice are discussed.

 

Citation

Cigrand, D. L., Wood, S. M., & Duys, D. (2014). School counselors’ use of solution-focused tenets and techniques in school-based site supervision. Journal of School Counseling, 12(15). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v12n15.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 12, Number 16:

 

Abandoning Colorblind Practice in School Counseling

Lance C. Smith and Anne M. Geroski, University of Vermont, and Katie B. Tyler, Shelburne, Vermont

 

Abstract

Drawing from three case vignettes and the extant literature, the authors seek to identify, problematize, and expand the discussion on colorblind approaches to diversity within the practice of school counseling. The authors discuss how such an approach to working with students from under-represented groups subtly blames the victim, limits the development of equity by positioning critical dialogues as counter-productive, and inhibits the understanding of within-group differences. The article concludes with suggestions for how school counselors can enhance the services they provide to students of various social locations by abandoning colorblind practices and choosing to remove their difference blindfolds.

 

Citation

Smith, L. C., Geroski, A. M., & Tyler, K. B. (2014). Abandoning colorblind practice in school counseling. Journal of School Counseling, 12(16). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v12n16.pdf

 

Type of Article

Current Issues

 

Volume 12, Number 17:

 

Get Fit for Life: Elementary School Group Counseling with a Twist

Sarah I. Springer, Montclair State University

 

Abstract

A significant number of elementary school-aged children participate in some form of athletic activity. As they become pre-teens, the percentage of these children involved in sports lessens, especially as children begin to recognize differences in athletic abilities. Research assessing youth sports suggests that adults and peers can increase children’s levels of motivation to participate in athletics by providing a climate that prioritizes social and emotional development. This article details a psychoeducation group designed by an elementary school counselor to encourage the integration of physical fitness and mental health initiatives that support a healthy lifestyle.

 

Citation

Springer, S. I. (2014). Get fit for life: Elementary school group counseling with a twist. Journal of School Counseling, 12(17). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v12n17.pdf

 

Type of Article

Innovative Methods

 

Volume 12, Number 18:

 

A Psychoeducational Group for Parents of Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Adolescents

Omar A. Troutman and Kathy M. Evans, University of South Carolina

 

Abstract

While literature abounds on the experience of the adolescent in the ‘coming out’ process and the impact that the event has on the family system, few interventions that are designed specifically to assist parents have been proposed. Parents of lesbian, gay, and bisexual adolescents face challenges that they may never have anticipated and, therefore, require special kinds of support resources as well as factual, nonbiased information. A parent-specific psychoeducational group intervention to be facilitated by school counselors is presented with a focus on adult development in the context of a changing family.

 

Citation

Troutman, O. A., & Evans, K. M. (2014). A psychoeducational group for parents of lesbian, gay, and bisexual adolescents. Journal of School Counseling, 12(18). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v12n18.pdf

 

Type of Article

Innovative Methods

 

Volume 12, Number 19:

 

A Qualitative Inquiry of International Adoptees in Schools

Chloe Lancaster and Donnalin C. L. Constantin, University of Memphis

 

Abstract

The purpose of this pilot study was to explore families of international adoption experiences within the schools. Qualitative methodology and grounded theory procedures were used to analyze data collected from semi-structured interviews conducted with three mothers who had adopted 8 children from orphanages in China. The concept of lack of structural support within schools emerged as the central organizing theme emblematic of mothers’ experiences as they each struggled to obtain supportive educational environments for their post-institutional children. Implications for school counseling practices are discussed.

 

Citation

Lancaster, C. & Constantin, D. C. L. (2014). A qualitative inquiry of international adoptees in schools. Journal of School Counseling, 12(19). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v12n19.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 12, Number 20:

 

Exploring the Needs of Students Experiencing Homelessness From School Counselors’ Perspectives

Stacey A. Havlik, Jennifer Brady, and Kathleen Gavin, Villanova University

 

Abstract

An increased understanding of the needs of students experiencing homelessness will better inform educational and clinical practices to ensure student success. Through an analysis of survey data using the Knowledge and Skills with Homeless Students Survey (Gaenzle & Bryan, 2013), this exploratory study applied a mixed methods approach to assess school counselors’ (N = 160) perceptions of the needs of students experiencing homelessness. Thematic analysis of the survey data indicated the existence of four dynamic and interrelated themes of student needs as well as differences in reported needs by school counselors’ school level and location.

 

Citation

Havlik, S. A., Brady, J., & Gavin, K. (2014). Exploring the needs of students experiencing homelessness from school counselors’ perspectives. Journal of School Counseling, 12(20). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v12n20.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 12, Number 21:

 

Youth Participatory Action Research and School Counseling Practice: A School-Wide Framework for Student Well-Being

Laura Smith, Katharine Beck, Erinn Bernstein, and Pasha Dashtguard, Teachers College, Columbia University

 

Abstract

The professional school counseling literature has proposed innovative frameworks for practice including social justice/multicultural approaches, school-wide counseling initiatives, and school-community partnerships. In this article, we propose a programmatic intervention that can be a vehicle for all three: the implementation of school-based youth participatory action research (YPAR). In this article, we profile the use of YPAR in schools, link it to components of school counseling, and identify obstacles in the initiation of YPAR by school counselors.

 

Citation

Smith, L., Beck, K, Bernstein, E., & Dashtguard, P. (2014). Youth participatory action research and school counseling practice: A school-wide framework for student well-being. Journal of School Counseling, 12(21). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v12n21.pdf

 

Type of Article

Innovative Methods

 

Volume 12, Number 22:

 

Assessing the Impact of a School-Based Group Approach With Adolescent Males

T. Michael Liddell and Sharon Robinson Kurpius, Arizona State University

 

Abstract

This study assessed the impact of a school-based group intervention, The Council for Boys and Young Men, specifically designed for adolescent males. The participants who attended an alternative school in a metropolitan area were randomly assigned to the intervention or to waitlist control groups. Measures assessed self-esteem, future and school-related self-efficacy, masculine identity ideology, identity distress, and relational aggression. Participants in The Council intervention group showed significant increases in school and future self-efficacy from pre- to post-test. For all boys at pre-test, higher scores on stereotypical masculine ideology were related to more relational aggression and lower self-esteem.

 

Citation

Liddell, T. M. & Robinson Kurpius, S. (2014). Assessing the impact of a school-based group approach with adolescent males. Journal of School Counseling, 12(22). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v12n22.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 12, Number 23:

 

Integrating Physical Activity, Coach Collaboration, and Life Skill Development in Youth: School Counselors’ Perceptions

Laura Hayden, Amy Cook, Alexandra Scherer, Scott Greenspan, Meghan Ray Silva, Melanie Cadet, and Erik Maki, University of Massachusetts Boston

 

Abstract

Given the social, emotional, and academic benefits of physical activity related to youth development (Hellison, 2011), coupled with the minimal research regarding how school counselors can use physical activity for life skill development, this article focuses on school counselors’ beliefs about collaborating with coaches and using physical activity to develop life skills. In surveying 338 school counselors, we found support for collaborating with coaches and using physical activity to develop life skills, in addition to interest in training opportunities for school counselors to integrate physical activity into their job. Implications for school counselors, coaches, and other stakeholders are provided.

 

Citation

Hayden, L., Cook, A., Scherer, A, Greenspan, S., Silva, M. R., Cadet, M., & Maki, E. (2014). Integrating physical activity, coach collaboration, and life skill development in youth: School counselors’ perceptions. Journal of School Counseling, 12(23). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v12n23.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 
 

2015

Volume 13, Number 1:

 

What Elementary Students Experience Outside of the Classroom: Children’s Responses to Social Exclusion

Sheila H. Chiffriller, Kelsey A. Kangos, and Lisa Milone, Pace University

 

Abstract

Social exclusion and the behaviors, thoughts, and feelings it evokes in children were examined in the present study. Two forms of exclusion were identified: being rejected and being ignored. Surveys were administered to third and fifth grade students in a Northeastern suburb in the United States to see how children respond overall and if younger and older elementary school students respond similarly. The students were asked to imagine themselves in four different peer situations in which they were included, rejected, or ignored and indicate how they would respond. Developmental differences and implications of the findings for counselors are discussed.

 

Citation

Chiffriller, S. H., Kangos, K. A., & Milone, L. (2015). What elementary students experience outside of the classroom: Children’s responses to social exclusion. Journal of School Counseling, 13(1). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v13n1.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 13, Number 2:

 

Supervision of School Counseling Students: A Focus on Personal Growth, Wellness, and Development

Adina Smith and Rebecca L. Koltz, Montana State University

 

Abstract

Results of a grounded theory study exploring the experiences and processes of school counseling students’ professional and personal growth are provided. The researchers used focus groups over a two-year period to better comprehend students their experiences of growth. Several themes emerged: defining personal growth, wellness, and clinical growth as a professional school counselor. Within each of these major themes several sub-themes exist. Given that this was a grounded theory study, a model regarding how school counselors’ experience and process both professional and clinical growth is included. Finally, implications for school counselors working as supervisors of practicum and internship students are provided with the intent to help supervisors understand the developmental differences and needs for counseling students.

 

Citation

Smith, A., & Koltz, R. L. (2015). Supervision of school counseling students: A focus on personal growth, wellness, and development. Journal of School Counseling, 13(2). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v13n2.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 13, Number 3:

 

What Factors Sustain Professional Growth Among School Counselors?

Varda Konstam and Amy L. Cook, University of Massachusetts Boston, Sara Tomek, University of Alabama, and Esmaeil Mahdavi, Robert Gracia, and Alexander H. Bayne, University of Massachusetts Boston

 

Abstract

This study examined relationships among self-reported professional expertise, organizational support of evidence-based practices (EBP), and professional growth. Data were collected from 85 members of American School Counseling Association (ASCA). School counselors with higher self-reported expertise reported that they were more likely to improve their school counseling skills. Those with more years of experience supervising school counselors also reported greater professional expertise. No linear relationship was found between organizational support of EBP and perceived professional expertise, which may be attributed to lack of adequate structural and organizational school supports. Implications for future research, counselor development, and supervision are discussed.

 

Citation

Konstam, V., Cook, A. L., Tomek, S., Mahdavi, E., Gracia, R., & Bayne, A. H. (2015). What factors sustain professional growth among school counselors? Journal of School Counseling, 13(3). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v13n3.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 13, Number 4:

 

Elementary School Counselors’ Collaboration With Community Mental Health Providers

Kristen Moran, Clemson University, and Nancy Bodenhorn, Virginia Tech

 

Abstract

Perceptions and experiences of elementary school counselors’ collaborative efforts with community mental health providers are examined through this exploratory phenomenological study. Ten participants engaged in two in-depth interviews. Collaboration was considered an effective way to increase services to students and their families. Six themes emerged: interactions in collaboration, commitment to collaboration, benefits of collaboration, components of effective collaboration, barriers to collaboration, and changes needed to collaboration. Implications for school counselors and counselor educators are discussed.

 

Citation

Moran, K., & Bodenhorn, N. (2015). Elementary school counselors’ collaboration with community mental health providers. Journal of School Counseling, 13(4). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v13n4.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 13, Number 5:

 

White School Counselors Becoming Racial Justice Allies to Students of Color: A Call to the Field of School Counseling

Lauren J. Moss, Kutztown University, and Anneliese A. Singh, The University of Georgia

 

Abstract

White school counselors must consider how racial identity, and whiteness as a construct, influences their work with students of color. This article addresses opportunities for White school counselors regarding how they may become allies to students of color and suggests way in which counselor educators can support the ally identity development in graduate students who are preparing to become school counselors. Intersections of racial privilege and ally identity development for White school counselors are described (Kendall, 2006; Mindrup, Spray & Lamberghini-West, 2011), and recommendations to the field of school counseling are made. Tenets of critical race theory (Ladson-Billings & Tate, 1995) and relational cultural theory (Jordan, 2010) are recommended as a theoretical framework for White school counselors’ efforts.

 

Citation

Moss, L. J., & Singh, A. A. (2015). White school counselors becoming racial justice allies to students of color: A call to the field of school counseling. Journal of School Counseling, 13(5). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v13n5.pdf

 

Type of Article

Current Issues

 

Volume 13, Number 6:

 

Assisting High School Students with Career Indecision Using a Shortened Form of the Career Construction Interview

Mark C. Rehfuss, Old Dominion University, and Pamela H. Sickinger, Simsbury High School

 

Abstract

A shortened form of the Career Construction Interview (CCI) was used to help high school students struggling with the career decision making process. The shortened instrument is described, as well as, its use with eleventh grade high school students who had low levels of career concern and career curiosity. Students who completed the exercise reported several themes that are introduced and discussed in the article. These themes reflected that the intervention was helpful and facilitated student self-understanding and career exploration. Practical applications for school counselors are discussed.

 

Citation

Rehfuss, M. C., & Sickinger, P. H. (2015). Assisting high school students with career indecision using a shortened form of the career construction interview. Journal of School Counseling, 13(6). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v13n6.pdf

 

Type of Article

Current Issues

 

Volume 13, Number 7:

 

A Model for School Counselors Supporting African American Youth With Forgiveness

Thomas W. Baskin, Jaquaye L. Russell, and Carey L. Sorenson, University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee, and Earlise C. Ward, University of Wisconsin – Madison

 

Abstract

The authors describe how practicing school counselors can appropriately and effectively work with African American youth regarding forgiveness. Further, the authors discuss the challenges that African American youth face. They illuminate how school counselors can help emotionally injured African American youth. As a school counseling intervention the forgiveness process can be conducted in a manner that is congruent with, and sensitive to, the development of positive African American ethnic identity. The use of forgiveness in school counseling is described, including the theory (Enright, 2001), and a case study, related to a process model of forgiveness.

 

Citation

Baskin, T. W., Russell, J. L., Sorenson, C. L., & Ward, E. C. (2015). A model for school counselors supporting African American youth with forgiveness. Journal of School Counseling, 13(7). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v13n7.pdf

 

Type of Article

Innovative Methods

 

Volume 13, Number 8:

 

School Counselors United in Professional Advocacy: A Systems Model

Dawnette L. Cigrand, Winona State University, Stacey Gaenzle Havlik and Krista M. Malott, Villanova University, and SaDohl Goldsmith Jones, Capella University

 

Abstract

Limited budgets may place educational positions in jeopardy and if school counseling positions become jeopardized, then school counselors must communicate their role and impact more effectively. However, school counselors may lack training and experience in professional self-advocacy practices, and advocacy efforts may be undermined by role confusion experienced by both counselors and the educational professionals surrounding them. This article describes one model of professional advocacy framed by Bronfenbrenner's Ecological Systems theory that may be used by school counseling leaders to plan systematic advocacy efforts that engage individual school counselors in united professional advocacy strategies.

 

Citation

Cigrand, D. L., Havlik, S. G. Malott, K. M., & Jones, S. G. (2015). School counselors united in professional advocacy: A systems model. Journal of School Counseling, 13(8). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v13n8.pdf

 

Type of Article

Current Issues

 

Volume 13, Number 9:

 

Building Connections to Literacy Learning Among English Language Learners: Exploring the Role of School Counselors

Amy L. Cook, University of Massachusetts Boston

 

Abstract

English language attainment and literacy acquisition are of significant importance to achieving academic success and college and career readiness in the United States. The rise in evidence-based standards requires concerted efforts by educators to meet the literacy needs of English language learners (ELLs). When collaborating with ELL teachers, school counselors are in a unique position to build literacy skills among ELL students, while simultaneously focusing on life skill development. This article provides specific suggestions for promoting literacy and social-emotional learning that school counselors can employ by collaborating with teachers and parents and through direct services with ELL students.

 

Citation

Cook, A. L. (2015). Building connections to literacy learning among English language learners: Exploring the role of school counselors. Journal of School Counseling, 13(9). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v13n9.pdf

 

Type of Article

Innovative Methods

 

Volume 13, Number 10:

 

Perceptions of a Gay-Straight Alliance Club Ban: School Counselors and Advocacy for LGBTQQ Students

Pamela S. Lassiter and Amy McCarthy Sifford, University of North Carolina at Charlotte

 

Abstract

This phenomenological inquiry explored the experiences and reactions of five school counselors who worked in a school that banned a Gay-Straight Alliance club. Specifically, the authors examined how counselors’ perceptions of the ban influenced their advocacy for LGBTQQ students. The results of semi-structured interviews revealed one overarching theme: The administration yielded to the status quo and three subthemes (1) the ban prevented students from receiving much needed support (2) proactive advocacy is the best course of action, and (3) change in communities is slow. Future practice and research directions are discussed.

 

Citation

Lassiter, P. S., & Sifford, A. M. (2015). Perceptions of a Gay-Straight Alliance club ban: School counselors and advocacy for LGBTQQ students. Journal of School Counseling, 13(10). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v13n10.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 13, Number 11:

 

High School Counselors’ Support and Latina/o Students’ Career Development

Javier Cavazos Vela, University of Texas at Brownsville, Brandé Flamez, Lamar University, and Ashley Clark, Commonwealth of Virginia Department for Aging and Rehabilitative Services

 

Abstract

The current study examined the impact of high school counselors’ support of Latina/o students’ career development outcomes. We used a quantitative, predictive design to explore Latina/o students’ vocational self-efficacy and outcome expectations. Perceptions of investment, accessibility, positive regard, appraisal, and expectations from school counselors did not impact Latina/o students’ vocational self-efficacy or outcome expectations. In addition to a discussion regarding the importance of these findings, implications for school counselors and researchers are offered.

 

Citation

Vela, J. C., Flamez, B., & Clark, A. (2015). High school counselors’ support and Latina/o students’ career development. Journal of School Counseling, 13(11). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v13n11.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 13, Number 12:

 

Experiences With Classism: A Look at Social Class in a Rural High School

Zachary Pietrantoni, Dorea Glance, and Krista M. Smith, Southern Illinois University

 

Abstract

The American School Counselor Association’s (ASCA) National Model (2012) stated school counselors serve as advocates for equity in access and success in educational opportunities for all students; however, Lott (2002) suggested classism now affects more students than in previous generations. Most research has focused on college students and little research has addressed the experiences with classism for high school students. The researchers addressed this gap through an ethnographic qualitative study on experiences with classism of a rural high school in Illinois. The researchers concluded with implications for school counselors and future research on the area of classism in high schools.

 

Citation

Pietrantoni, Z., Glance, D., & Smith, K. M. (2015). Experiences with classism: A look at social class in a rural high school. Journal of School Counseling, 13(12). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v13n12.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 13, Number 13:

 

A Window Into South Korean Culture: Stress and Coping in Female High School Students

Tim S. VanderGast, William Paterson University, Sejal Parikh Foxx and Claudia Flowers, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Andrew Thomas Rouse, University of North Carolina at Pembroke, and Karen M. Decker, William Paterson University

 

Abstract

In an effort to increase multicultural competence, professional counselors in the United States analyzed archival data from high school students from Seoul, South Korea. A sample of all female (N = 577) high school students responded to survey questions related to stress and coping. Results demonstrated statistical significance in levels of stress between grade levels, and the relationship between stress and coping. Results suggest the need for continued development of professional school counseling programs in South Korea high schools for student wellness.

 

Citation

VanderGast, T. S., Foxx, S. P., Flowers, C., Rouse, A. T., & Decker, K. M. (2015). A window into South Korean culture: Stress and coping in female high school students. Journal of School Counseling, 13(13). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v13n13.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 13, Number 14:

 

School Counselors’ Perceptions of Differences Between Successful and Less Successful Latina/o High School Students

Javier Cavazos Vela, Ming-Tsan P. Lu, and Stacey L. Gonzalez, University of Texas Rio Grande Valley, Robert L. Smith, Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi, and Shaghayegh Azadi-Setayesh, University of Texas Rio Grande Valley

 

Abstract

In this qualitative study, we conducted in-depth interviews with secondary school counselors to understand differences between successful and less successful Latina/o students. Using an ecological framework as a theoretical lens, we highlighted differences between successful and less successful Latina/o high school students consistent with individual, interpersonal, and institutional categories. The following themes emerged: determination and commitment, motivation, goal setting, positive behavior and attitudes, family support, role models, school and teacher support, socioeconomic status, and environment. Following a discussion regarding differences between successful and less successful Latina/o students, we provide recommendations for researchers and school counselors to identify studies and interventions to help Latina/o students become academically successful.

 

Citation

Vela, J. C., Lu, M. P., Gonzalez, S. L., Smith, R. L., & Azadi-Setayesh, S. (2015). School counselors’ perceptions of differences between successful and less successful Latina/o high school students. Journal of School Counseling, 13(14). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v13n14.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 13, Number 15:

 

Rural School Counselors and LGBTQ Students

Phyllis K. Robertson, Western Carolina University, and Jennifer Full, East McDowell Middle School, Marion, North Carolina

 

Abstract

The pathways employed school counselors take for continuing their education beyond graduate school on issues of diversity may be somewhat limited in rural areas and the perception may be that few lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer/questioning students exist in rural schools. School counselors have an ethical and legal obligation to create safe and welcoming environments for LGBTQ students. This paper provides a brief examination of traditional approaches to professional development on sexual minority issues and a proposal for alternative educational opportunities for rural school counselors.

 

Citation

Robertson, P. K. & Full, J. (2015). Rural school counselors and LGBTQ students. Journal of School Counseling, 13(15). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v13n15.pdf

 

Type of Article

Current Issues

 

Volume 13, Number 16:

 

In Their Own Voices: Adolescent African American Males’ Experiences of the Achievement Gap

Natasha S. Moon and Anneliese A. Singh, The University of Georgia

 

Abstract

The authors use a phenomenological research tradition grounded in CRT tenets to describe the daily lived experiences that 12 male African American youth had in relation to the achievement gap. Researchers collected individual semi-structured interviews and focus group data related to the study phenomenon. There were five themes identified in participant data: (a) achievement gap or resource gap? (b) salience of parental support, (c) environmental obstacles related to academic achievement, (d) individual motivation and effort, and (e) resiliency and persistence in the face of racism. Implications for school counseling research, practice, and advocacy with African American male youth and study limitations are discussed.

 

Citation

Moon, N. S., & Singh, A. A. (2015). In their own voices: Adolescent African American males’ experiences of the achievement gap. Journal of School Counseling, 13(16). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v13n16.pdf

 

Type of Article

Theory and Research

 

Volume 13, Number 17:

 

Interpersonal Process Group Counseling for Educationally Marginalized Youth: The MAGNIFY Program

Christopher D. Slaten and Zachary M. Elison, Purdue University

 

Abstract

Youth mental health is an area of profound disparity between the demand and supply of services, particularly in schools that serve students at risk of school dropout. This article describes the conceptual foundations and implementation of MAGNIFY, a program that provides free group counseling to small alternative schools with students who have a history of behavioral problems in school or have been labeled at risk of dropping out of school. MAGNIFY is a non-structured program that uses school counseling graduate students to facilitate weekly school-based interpersonal process groups and is financially supported by local businesses and donors. Program components, finances, limitations, and implications are discussed.

 

Citation

Slaten, C. D., & Elison, Z. M. (2015). Interpersonal process group counseling for educationally marginalized youth: The MAGNIFY program. Journal of School Counseling, 13(17). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v13n17.pdf

 

Type of Article

Innovative Methods

 

Volume 13, Number 18:

 

Promoting College Access Among Latina/o English Language Learners: Implications for Professional School Counselors

Amy L. Cook, University of Massachusetts Boston, and Rachelle Pérusse and Eliana D. Rojas, University of Connecticut

 

Abstract

According to the U.S. Department of Education (2010), Latina/o English language learners (ELL students) are less likely to complete high school and attend college compared to their White non-Latina/o peers. Numerous factors affect Latina/o ELL students’ academic achievement, including insufficient resources, acculturation issues, attitudinal barriers, immigration factors, and English-language proficiency. Through a literature review, we identify particular school counselor interventions that address these barriers and promote college access among Latina/o ELL students.

 

Citation

Cook, A. L., Pérusse, R., & Rojas, E. D. (2015). Promoting college access among Latina/o English language learners: Implications for professional school counselors. Journal of School Counseling, 13(18). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v13n18.pdf

 

Type of Article

Innovative Methods

 

Volume 13, Number 19:

 

PACES: A Model of Student Well-Being

Mark D. Nelson, Dawn S. Tarabochia, and Rebecca L. Koltz, Montana State University

 

Abstract

School counselors design, deliver, and evaluate comprehensive, developmental school counseling programs that are focused on enhancing student development and success. A model of student well-being, known as PACES, is defined and described that consists of five distinct and interactive domains: physical, affective, cognitive, economic, and social. Suggestions are offered regarding how the PACES model can be used to enrich the delivery of school counseling programs.

 

Citation

Nelson, M. D., Tarabochia, D. S., & Koltz, R. L. (2015). Paces: A model of student well-being. Journal of School Counseling, 13(19). Retrieved from http://www.jsc.montana.edu/articles/v13n19.pdf

 

Type of Article

Innovative Methods